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Theodore Dalrymple: Planet Obama
The American Conservative ^ | December 01, 2008 | Theodore Dalrymple

Posted on 11/26/2008 4:05:10 PM PST by neverdem

Global euphoria is better than the disrepute of the Bush years, but so far our new president’s appeal is entirely symbolic.

By Theodore Dalrymple

Like it or not, the election of Barack Obama to the presidency of the United States has done an immense amount to restore American prestige in the world. Not since the destruction of the Twin Towers has there been dancing in the streets anywhere on the planet to celebrate events in America. It is to be hoped, of course, that it is not the same people doing the dancing.

In Delhi, Indians kissed Obama’s photo. Parties spilled into the Kenyan streets. In Britain, the newspapers were beside themselves with joy. The Daily Mirror, a tabloid with a circulation of 3 million, ran a photo of the president-elect with a single large word to accompany it: BELIEVE. Even politicians who might have been expected to have more affinity for John McCain took pains to rejoice over Obama’s victory.

A group of 8,000 Bedouin living in Galilee gleefully claimed Obama as a relative, thanks to his resemblance to a Kenyan who had worked in British-mandated Palestine in the 1930s. It is unlikely that anyone would have claimed Senator McCain, let alone President Bush, as a long-lost relative.

In France, the left-leaning, originally Maoist newspaper Liberation said that the fact that America had a member of a racial minority and a woman among the contenders for the highest offices in the land meant that France could learn something about democracy from America. (It meant openness, which is not quite the same as democracy and may even sometimes be its opposite.)

When he went to Berlin, Obama addressed 200,000 enthusiastic people; it is doubtful that the Republican candidate would have drawn 200. After his election, the German tabloid Bild carried the headline “Messiah Obama,” and though one might have thought that Germans, of all people, would have had enough of political messiahs, the characterization was a compliment. “Everyone has fallen in love with the new America,” Bild said.

That a man who came from as inauspicious a beginning as Obama’s could be elected president of the United States has demonstrated to millions around the globe that the idea of America as the land of opportunity is not mere mythology, and that whatever its faults, the U.S. political system is an extremely open one. The 21st-century version of From Log Cabin to White House is now From Food Stamps to White House.

Furthermore, the election of an opponent of George W. Bush, that object of global scorn, reassured the world that, contrary to conspiracy theorists, the United States is not a giant run by a tiny coterie of ruthless men bent on world domination.

Finally, the fact that Obama is black goes a long way toward expunging America’s original historical sin, that of racism. It renders nugatory the charge of intellectuals around the world—and in American academia—that its pretensions to being the Land of the Free are hypocritical, a sentiment first expressed in Doctor Johnson’s famous question from his “Taxation No Tyranny” of 1775: “How is it that we hear the loudest yelps for liberty among the drivers of negroes?”

Of course, there have been important positions occupied before by American blacks, both elected and appointed. But the presidency has a symbolic importance beyond its constitutional weight, and now no one will ever again be able to say that a man of African extraction cannot obtain the votes of large numbers of whites.

There are, it is true, a few naysayers: in the liberal British newspaper The Guardian, columnists whom one suspects were either stuck for something new to say about the election or prey to especial private bitterness argued that the election was not really a blow for racial equality because Michelle Obama could never have been elected, and the Republican Party certainly would never have chosen a black nominee. This seems to be a somewhat hard test for the United States to pass. Such people will not really be satisfied until the Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan is black.

On the other hand, the columnists did inadvertently draw attention to the absurdity of assuming that Obama’s election will have some magical effect upon race relations. It is grossly premature to think that America, or anywhere else for that matter, has now reached some kind of post-racial consciousness in which color has become completely unimportant. To think so is to be very unrealistic about the potentialities and the actualities of the human race itself.

But here is what Janine di Giovanni, an American expatriate living in Paris, wrote in London’s Evening Standard:

The surrealness of it struck me yesterday at Bon Marche. The man at the exchange counter, usually so surly, asked me my nationality. I got ready to do the usual: bowing my head with shame and whispering so no one could hear: ‘Americaine.’

Thanks to the election, this cringe was no longer necessary, neither from the prudential nor the philosophical point of view: Then it hit me. I no longer had to feel ashamed! Barack Obama had liberated me and my fellow expats from a lifetime of humiliation. ‘I’m American,’ I practically shouted…

Note here that it was President-elect Obama’s achievement alone, and not that of her fellow Americans who voted for him. This in itself speaks volumes of her racism, albeit of the Worc Mij, rather than the Jim Crow, variety. For her, Obama’s achievement was greater than that of all earlier Americans put together, from Benjamin Franklin to Mark Twain to Jonas Salk. Only he gave her reason to be proud. She continued:

But after Barack, it’s different. The day of the elections, I received this email from a French friend: ‘To my American friends, this won’t happen often, so savour it. Here is a high five to your great country from a Frenchman.’ Another French friend wrote: ‘You guys make huge mistakes but when you do it right, you really do it.’

Whether this reflects more upon the American author or her French friends is a difficult question. What seems certain is that if an American of Chinese or Indian origin had been elected, Janine de Giovanni would not have written with quite so much self-satisfaction. From this it follows that she has race on the brain, and one race more than others. At the very least, you could not call this a post-racial consciousness brought about by Obama’s victory.

Indeed, the idea that all historical sins have been washed away and all social difficulties resolved by the sprinkling of the holy water of this election is patently absurd, as absurd as investing the president-elect with magical powers in other directions.

George W. Bush’s presidency marked the recent nadir of American popularity and trust in its leadership, according to polls nearly everywhere. “It is better to be feared than loved,” AEI’s Michael Ledeen advised Bush. But to be feared is not quite the same as to be powerful, for you can be feared for reasons other than the power you wield. Power is in any case often an illusion and it always has limits. Did the Iraq war deter or encourage Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev?

Barack Obama cannot singlehandedly accomplish a rehabilitation, neither by force of personality nor as a political emblem. Indeed, world skepticism is already making a comeback. Italian journalist Michele Brambilla pointed out the obvious: Obama is but a politician, and one should not expect too much of politicians as a species. A wary China Daily wrote that Obama had been elected because voters judged him to have a better grasp of how to respond to the economic crisis, but noted that there is no practical evidence to show that he does—and his comments on Chinese economic policy and how he might respond to it could lead to conflict. In the Middle East, Obama’s support for Israel during the election led most people to think that, from the Arab perspective, there would not be much change, at least for the better.

Here it is useful to remember Marx’s words, not untrue simply because they came from him, in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon:

Men make their own history, but they do not make it as they please; they do not make it under self-selected circumstances, but under circumstances existing already, given and transmitted from the past. The tradition of all dead generations weighs like a nightmare on the brains of the living

For all his transcendent appeal, Obama cannot overcome the harsh realities of a troubled world. He inherits two wars, from one of which, Iraq, he has promised swiftly to extricate America, the other of which, Afghanistan, he has promised to win by expanding the effort. This is not exactly what the Times of India meant when it suggested that Obama stood for all that was good in America while Bush stood for “the bullying superpower that undertakes bellicose adventures abroad.”

It might not be altogether easy to withdraw from Iraq without the appearance of defeat, which would deal a great blow to American prestige and pretensions. If Iraq without America declines into chaos, defeat it will have been, a near pointless and very expensive expedition that solved nothing. And although Obama has said that, unlike his predecessor, he will give the military clear objectives, it is far from clear what the goal is in Afghanistan and, if there is one, whether it can be achieved.

Does Obama think that foreign policy is the pursuit of interests or ideals, or that interests can be secured only by the forcible promotion of ideals? Does he understand that no power, be it ever so great, is sufficient to mold others into precisely the desired form? That Afghanistan will never be Denmark? To adapt slightly Marx’s dictum, countries can be changed, but not changed as others please: they are not putty in the fingers of workmen. Does the false analogy with postwar Germany and Japan, the great success stories of transformation brought about by war, have any place in his mind? We do not know. All we know is that he is like the traveler in Ireland who asks the local how to get to a certain destination and receives the reply, “If I were going there, I wouldn’t start from here.”

When I looked at Obama shortly after the election, with his economic advisers behind him, I had a powerful sense of looking at a Politburo: gray-faced old men, tried and tested—which is not quite the same as successful, of course, except in the most careerist terms.

They were the living—or perhaps undead—embodiment of old ideas, the other side of the coin to Obama’s soaring speeches. That rhetoric was always stale, despite the excellence of its delivery. When, for example, he said that he wanted to protect the pensions of employees rather than the severance of CEO’s, he was appealing not to reason but to a force very much more powerful than reason—resentment. It is true that chief executive officers have managed to extract large sums from companies over whose destruction they have presided. But it requires very little thought to realize that it is a little late in the day to save people’s pensions by being derogatory about CEO’s, however much they might deserve it.

Moreover, the appointment of Rahm Emanuel, a former director of Freddie Mac and the largest congressional recipient of hedge-fund donations, as White House chief of staff induces a powerful and not very pleasant sense of déjà vu. The appointment is a sign of things to come.

Britain has seen the Obama effect before. In 1997, a fresh-faced politician called Anthony Blair, promising the sun, the moon, and the stars, spoke with a passionate intensity that was somewhat lacking in detail and was elected to office in the land. His was a bright new dawn: a government that governed for the many not the few, as he put it, giving the country a fresh start after a long-lasting, decrepit, and exhausted government had been thoroughly discredited.

Within a short time, this former unilateral-disarmer had proved himself the most belligerent and bellicose leader of Britain in recent times, willing to attack anyone as long as the victim couldn’t fight back. His protests at the corruption of the previous government soon seemed to be more at its trifling scale rather than its dishonesty. What had been but a cottage industry became wholesale looting, peculation, influence-peddling, and embezzlement, all under a careful cover of legality and deep public purpose. Nothing like it had been seen since the 18th century. Shady businessmen of every nationality (and none) were sure of a receptive ear (and purse). With freedom in his mouth, Prime Minister Blair created one new criminal offense a day for ten years and oversaw an unprecedented increase in bureaucratic control and official surveillance. Profligate with spending public funds to build an immense constituency of dependents, ranging from the near destitute to multimillionaires created by government contracts, he left a country—though of course not himself—on the brink of ruin. Speaking with evangelical fervor and giving every appearance of taking himself in, he behaved with a lack of scruple that left even cynics amazed and departed office the most reviled man in his nation’s recent history.

I hope I am wrong in seeing an analogy with President-elect Obama. I hope that his rhetoric does not conceal as empty an interior as Blair’s. That his youthfulness and rhetorical idealism do not belie an authoritarianism. That his moralizing does not conceal a lack of scruple and contempt for due process. That by social justice he does not mean pork barrel. But I do not think the auguries are good. When I heard him promise that he would cut taxes for 95 percent of Americans, I wondered how anyone could believe it for a moment, or that he would go through the budget line by line, as he said he would. Compared to that, Fairyland is intensely real.

For now, Obama’s election has restored American prestige. It denies anti-Americans the pleasure of charging America with irredeemable racism. But the roots of anti-Americanism are far deeper than the ostensible reasons for it. Americans no less than the rest of the world have reason to be skeptical.  
__________________________________________

Theodore Dalrymple is a retired doctor who divides his time between France and England. He is contributing editor of the City Journal and his latest book is Not With a Bang but a Whimper.

The American Conservative welcomes letters to the editor.
Send letters to: letters@amconmag.com


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: 1stkenyanpresident; barackobama; dalrymple; fubo; obama; obamatransitionfile; theodoredalrymple

1 posted on 11/26/2008 4:05:10 PM PST by neverdem
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To: neverdem
Like it or not, the election of Barack Obama to the presidency of the United States has done an immense amount to restore American prestige in the world

1. The Nation of Islam and Louis Farrakhan

2. William Ayers (Weather Underground), Advocated that young people kill their parents.

3. Bernardine Dohrn (Weather Underground), Praised the Charles Manson murders.

4. Students for a Democratic Society (SDS). Tom Hayden (Former SDS president), encouraged activists to firebomb police cars; Michael Klonsky (SDS Leader) and Communist Party (Marxist-Leninist) (CPML) chairman from 1979-1981; Mark Rudd (succeeded Klonsky as national SDS leader), "Probably the biggest difference between Columbia SDS people in 1968 and in 2008 is forty years.”; Carl Davidson (one of three elected SDS leaders), along with Klonsky rejected traditional politics for fringe Marxist movements. More recently, he helped organize the 2002 rally in which Obama first spoke out against the Iraq War and now serves as the webmaster of Progressives for Obama.

5. Raila Odinga (Kenia's ethnic clensing communist leader and vote stealer)

6. Mohammar Khaddafi, stated that the Arab world is "ready to back and finance the Muslim Obama."

7. Daniel Ortega (Nicaraguan Marxist president), on his Obama endorsement speech, "It's not to say that there is already a revolution under way in the U.S. ... but yes, they are laying the foundations for a revolutionary change."

8. Hamas. Ahmed Yousuf, Hamas’ top political adviser in the Gaza Strip, delivered his endorsement in an interview with WorldNetDaily and WABC Radio in New York. “We like Mr. Obama, and we hope that he will win the elections,” Yousuf said.

9. Rashid Khalidi. PLO executive when PLO was considered a terrorist organization. Still justifies Muslim terrorism as resistance fighters. Was on the board with Obama in the Woods Foundation. Held a fundraiser for Obama in 2000.

10. CAIR

11. ACORN

12. Communist Party USA (CPUSA). "A broad multiclass, multiracial movement is converging around Obama's "Hope, change and unity" campaign because they see in it the thrilling opportunity to end 30 years of ultra-right rule and move our nation forward with a broadly progressive agenda. This diverse movement combines a variety of political currents and aims in a working coalition that is crucial to social progress at this point. […] The struggle to defeat the ultra-right and turn our country on a positive path will not end with Obama's election. But that step will shift the ground for successful struggles going forward."

13. Committees of Correspondence for Democracy and Socialism (CCDS, Danny Glover's organization), see: http://www.cc-ds.org/critical_moment.html

14. Democratic Socialists of America (DSA). Look here to see how he got his start: http://www.chicagodsa.org/ngarchive/ng45.html

15. Fidel Castro, Castro writes that Obama is “the most progressive candidate to the U.S. presidency” and suggests he possesses "great intelligence."

16. Black Panthers, extremist hate group, endorsed and was on Obama's web site as an endorser, but because of political pressure it is no longer there. Screenshot is here: http://bp3.blogger.com/_gO3ai_bAh-s/...ma_panther.jpg

It goes on *FOREVER*. America's enemies endorse Comrade Barry.

2 posted on 11/26/2008 4:13:01 PM PST by TonyStark
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To: neverdem

When is someone going to come out with an ‘Ameri-Cons vs. the World’ videogame. I know it wouldn’t be a fair fight but I would buy it for Christmas.


3 posted on 11/26/2008 4:14:05 PM PST by vbmoneyspender
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To: neverdem

I think Dr. Daniels should stick to writing about what he knows best, the low-life culture fostered by the nanny state.


4 posted on 11/26/2008 4:15:51 PM PST by Ozone34 ("There are only two philosophies: Thomism and bullshitism!" -Leon Bloy)
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To: neverdem
Love Dalrymple - one of the few European commentators on the United States that I take seriously. That does not mean we always agree.

Not since the destruction of the Twin Towers has there been dancing in the streets anywhere on the planet to celebrate events in America. It is to be hoped, of course, that it is not the same people doing the dancing.

Unfortunately, those very same people were doing a great deal of dancing. It is revealing and should be unsettling to Obama partisans just how many of America's (and not Bush's) committed enemies were applauding Obama's election.

Power is in any case often an illusion and it always has limits. Did the Iraq war deter or encourage Vladimir Putin and Dmitry Medvedev?

Probably neither. It did, however, motivate Libya to give up her own nuclear efforts and Assad to withdraw from the occupation of Lebanon. It also served to discourage Saddam Hussein from making further trouble unless he can rise from the grave, and if the Taliban are still fighting it's from caves. It did do all of that. And no one such as Putin or Medvedev who has the memory of the Soviet Union's antics in Hungary and Czechoslovakia can argue that Iraq inspired them to invade another country. No marks for Dalrymple on that one.

It might not be altogether easy to withdraw from Iraq without the appearance of defeat, which would deal a great blow to American prestige and pretensions.

Obama will do nothing of the sort, and I'm a little surprised to see the normally better-informed Dalrymple fall for the party line on this one. Any appearance of defeat in Iraq will be a sham, an illusion perpetrated to protect the international commentariat from an admission that they were wrong and Bush was right, and that the cold truth is that American won in Iraq. That is not an admission I see likely to be made unless the credit can be deflected somehow to Obama. Watch for it, it's going to happen.

I hope I am wrong in seeing an analogy with President-elect Obama...that his youthfulness and rhetorical idealism do not belie an authoritarianism. That his moralizing does not conceal a lack of scruple and contempt for due process. That by social justice he does not mean pork barrel. But I do not think the auguries are good. When I heard him promise that he would cut taxes for 95 percent of Americans, I wondered how anyone could believe it for a moment, or that he would go through the budget line by line, as he said he would. Compared to that, Fairyland is intensely real.

Here we do agree. Obama certainly was the beneficiary of the Fairyland vote, largely because its inhabitants bought into the same litany of garbage concerning Bush that so many Europeans did. Some of them are waking up at the moment to the hard truth that there are no yellow brick roads and no ruby slippers. There is, however, a Man Behind The Curtain, and his feet are made of clay.

5 posted on 11/26/2008 4:26:55 PM PST by Billthedrill
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To: neverdem
. . . the election of an opponent of George W. Bush, that object of global scorn, reassured the world that, contrary to conspiracy theorists, the United States is not a giant run by a tiny coterie of ruthless men bent on world domination

Yet another writer utterly ignorant of Obama's backers. He should stick to writing what he knows about, which he does so extraordinarily well.

6 posted on 11/26/2008 4:27:16 PM PST by Buchal ("Two wings of the same bird of prey . . .")
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To: Ozone34

LOL did you read the entire article?

Seriously, you should, especially the comparison to Tony Blair (which one could also argue is the starting point for the true decline of Britain.)


7 posted on 11/26/2008 4:31:21 PM PST by Skywalk (Transdimensional Jihad!)
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To: vbmoneyspender

In Delhi, Indians kissed Obama’s photo.
Today thier were terrorists attacks in India against British and American citizens, SO MUCH FOR THE LOVE, CAN YOU FEEL IT? STOP WITH ALL THE NONSENSE AND GARBAGE! The big stick kept them at bay, now they know all we want to do is talk and sing kume bia ya.


8 posted on 11/26/2008 4:52:33 PM PST by ronnie raygun ( When CHANGE comes let me know, I'll put my tin foil hat on and sit in front of myTV)
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To: neverdem
The Ruskies are not indulging in the global euphoria. Infact, the Ruskies see Obama as a portal of things to come, of the resurgence of Russian influence.

HRC and the Obamacorns somehow believe that if they only wish and hope and pray hard enough, that global affairs will be OK.....

They have no chance of stopping Russia from expanding into the western hemisphere.

Russian doesn't care if we are socialist, communist or gay. They know weakness when they see it and are ready to take full advantage of liberal, democrat naivete.

9 posted on 11/26/2008 4:58:19 PM PST by x_plus_one (Muhammed and Allah = 2 memes destined for the ashheap of history.....)
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To: Buchal
When I looked at Obama shortly after the election, with his economic advisers behind him, I had a powerful sense of looking at a Politburo: gray-faced old men, tried and tested—which is not quite the same as successful, of course, except in the most careerist terms.

Ignorant? Not at all. Perceptive is the word.

10 posted on 11/26/2008 5:05:48 PM PST by Seven plus One
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To: x_plus_one
They have no chance of stopping Russia from expanding into the western hemisphere.

I don't think they have any intention of trying. I don't think it concerns them very much. Russian domination of eastern and even central Europe, I think they think, is the natural order of things. And the Obamans and Clintonists share a disinterest in the problems of countries who can't vote for them. Unless they hire one of their lobbying firms; then its off to the races.

11 posted on 11/26/2008 5:20:00 PM PST by marron
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To: neverdem

What a waste of space. This is nothing more than the usual left wing drivel.


12 posted on 11/26/2008 5:20:37 PM PST by NurdlyPeon (Sara Palin: Americas' last, best hope for survival.)
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To: neverdem

Did anyone actually read the article beyond the first line?

From nearly all the comments, I’m guessing no.


13 posted on 11/26/2008 5:26:36 PM PST by denydenydeny ("Banish Merry Christmas. Get ready for Mad Max.."-Daniel Henninger)
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To: neverdem

“The surrealness of it struck me yesterday at Bon Marche. The man at the exchange counter, usually so surly, asked me my nationality. I got ready to do the usual: bowing my head with shame and whispering so no one could hear: ‘Americaine.’”

I am soooooo sick of this kind of whining POS.

My uncle, and many other good young men lost their futures and lives liberating that country, on June 6th, 1944. They certainly are bowing their heads in shame from where they are now, every time tripe like this is spewn.

I know it’s not on topic,but oh well.


14 posted on 11/26/2008 5:35:57 PM PST by 383rr (Those who choose security over liberty deserve neither- GUN CONTROL=SLAVERY)
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To: Seven plus One

Agreed, Dalrymple misses very little, a by-product of his training and work experience I suppose.
BTW, this is quite a short piece for him, he’s usually very wordy indeed !


15 posted on 11/26/2008 5:39:14 PM PST by 1066AD
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To: NurdlyPeon; denydenydeny
What a waste of space. This is nothing more than the usual left wing drivel.

LOL! Did you read the entire article? He's an English conservative describing reactions abroad. You have to get beyond the opening half dozen or so paragraphs.

16 posted on 11/26/2008 5:42:14 PM PST by neverdem (Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem

Another excellent piece by TD.


17 posted on 11/26/2008 5:50:02 PM PST by Revolting cat! (Everytime they open their mouth they shoot themselves in the foot.)
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To: neverdem
Dalrymple's take on one Janine, an American expatriate living in Paris, was pretty telling. After one reads and writhed at the effrontery of certain French people who knew her- here I digress, did she really usually murmur with shame about her nationality - "Americaine?". Did these patronising sods really say, "you do things right" when you do them? I wonder about these anecdotes about certain people.

Perhaps the good doctor was sold a bill of goods. Anyway, as for American expatriates living in Paris, putting up with patronising sods. Fancy that!

18 posted on 11/26/2008 5:52:08 PM PST by Peter Libra
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To: neverdem
LOL! Did you read the entire article?

No, I read the entire article twice. My statement stands.

19 posted on 11/26/2008 5:55:36 PM PST by NurdlyPeon (Sara Palin: Americas' last, best hope for survival.)
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To: neverdem
I myself did not read too carefully. Black mark!. I then read the article on one Janine. The Doctor was quoting the Evening Standard newspaper. My error in attributing it to the Doctor's re-telling.

Altogether a pretty fair piece. I understand people, especially we Freepers getting hot under the collar, I tell myself to re think before posting. What beats me is if some Americans told those patronising sods in Europe and my own native country, about the "wunnerful, wunnerful job" on whom THEY elect. Same thing for Canada too.

God Bless America.

20 posted on 11/26/2008 5:59:06 PM PST by Peter Libra
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To: 383rr
You are on topic, if I may say so.

Damn their ingratitude. They and the modern day Germans deserve each other. Rash words from me, but numbers of British and Canadians died liberating them as well.

They could care less.

21 posted on 11/26/2008 6:03:05 PM PST by Peter Libra
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To: Peter Libra

I don’t think your words are a bit rash, and I agree with all you’ve said.


22 posted on 11/26/2008 6:30:43 PM PST by 383rr (Those who choose security over liberty deserve neither- GUN CONTROL=SLAVERY)
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To: NurdlyPeon; Revolting cat!; Billthedrill
No, I read the entire article twice. My statement stands.

To each his own. Others disagree. I thought the camparisons of Obama with Blair and the economic advisers with the Politburo were especially chilling.

23 posted on 11/26/2008 6:44:58 PM PST by neverdem (Xin loi min oi)
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To: neverdem

Bump.....


24 posted on 11/26/2008 7:22:23 PM PST by Intolerant in NJ
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To: Skywalk

“LOL did you read the entire article?

Seriously, you should, especially the comparison to Tony Blair (which one could also argue is the starting point for the true decline of Britain.)”

I believe I’ve read almost everything Dr. Daniels has written including this piece.


25 posted on 11/26/2008 7:30:42 PM PST by Ozone34 ("There are only two philosophies: Thomism and bullshitism!" -Leon Bloy)
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To: neverdem

Thank God! Without The Big 0, Americans would probably have been targeted in India today.

What?

Oh.

Never mind.


26 posted on 11/26/2008 7:32:54 PM PST by John W (Voters were more afraid of losing their money than losing their souls.)
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To: neverdem

Planet Obama makes me think of the Sister’s of Mercy song “Black Planet”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qiHSYu5iKv8&feature=related


27 posted on 11/26/2008 9:49:14 PM PST by Swiss
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To: neverdem

read later


28 posted on 11/26/2008 9:51:47 PM PST by LiteKeeper (Beware the secularization of America; the Islamization of Eurabia)
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To: Seven plus One

I think the great misperception characteristic of our age is misperceiving incompetence (”not quite the same as successful”) for evil (”ruthless men bent on world domination”). Can Henry Paulson really believe that the answer to excessive and crumbling debt is to push more of it? Can Timothy Geithner? Can they believe that the problem of banks too big to fail is to loan them money to make themselves bigger? Is there not a Politiburo? Is its aims for America really good?


29 posted on 11/26/2008 9:54:30 PM PST by Buchal ("Two wings of the same bird of prey . . .")
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To: Tax-chick

bttt


30 posted on 11/27/2008 5:38:53 AM PST by Tax-chick ("And the LORD alone will be exalted in that day." (Is. 2)
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