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Korean Methodists Celebrate Americans (Appreciation of America from an Asian country)
The American Spectator ^ | Dec 23,2008 | Mark Tooley

Posted on 12/23/2008 6:46:05 PM PST by SeekAndFind

The largest Methodist congregation in the world is the 120,000 member Kumnan Church in Seoul, Korea, whose pastor/bishop is an colorful enthusiast for South Korea's alliance with America.

"Without [the] U.S. presence, Korea would not have grown to be one of the largest concentrations of Christians in the world," explained a senior U.S. Army chaplain to the United Methodist News Service recently. "The Korean people are on fire for the Lord. Bishop Kim credits his success to prayer and preaching the unadulterated Word of God."

Methodist Bishop Hong-Do Kim is the 70-year-old pastor who led a 75 member congregation to become one of the world's largest churches. He has helped organize three pro-American rallies in Seoul, and has visited the Pentagon with other Korean pastors to thank the U.S. for its military presence in South Korea. Bishop Kim vividly contrasts with U.S. Methodist officials, who have repeatedly condemned the U.S. presence in South Korea.

"Your country is always kept in our minds as a country that helped us receive the Christian faith and defend our country half a century ago, when Korea's peace and democracy were at the brink of great danger," Bishop Kim wrote President Bush several years ago. "We are always grateful to your country and your people and are very pleased that we maintain the closest ally relationship between our two countries."

Bishop Kim chairs the Korean-American Protestant Pastors' Association, which helped raise $1.3 million for stained-glass windows in the Pentagon's Memorial Chapel after 9/11, according to a U.S. military news service. "Wherever I may go I like to express my gratitude to America," Kim told a reporter while at the Pentagon in 2006. "We can feel [the] safety," thanks to U.S. troops.

(Excerpt) Read more at spectator.org ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: america; korea; korean; methodist

1 posted on 12/23/2008 6:46:07 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind

And if we would have won Vietnam, there would be another hotbed of Christianity. But instead the region is largely controlled run by communists and muslims.


2 posted on 12/23/2008 6:49:29 PM PST by Always Right (Obama: more arrogant than Bill Clinton, more naive than Jimmy Carter, and more liberal than LBJ.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Yes I find it ironic that South Korea’s Methodists seem to have more love and appreciation for the USA than home-grown ones do.

Remember the flap from the US Methodist contingent about President Bush’s library being placed at Southern “Methodist” University (more Catholics there than Methodists now.)


3 posted on 12/23/2008 6:49:52 PM PST by jtal
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To: SeekAndFind

Kamsa hamnida (thank you) Korean Christians.


4 posted on 12/23/2008 6:52:21 PM PST by A_Former_Democrat
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To: A_Former_Democrat

I am still in awe at a 120,000 member church ! ( and I thought Joel Osteen’s church was already humongous).


5 posted on 12/23/2008 6:53:55 PM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind; Tamar1973; TigerLikesRooster

BTTT

And Merry Christmas!!!


6 posted on 12/23/2008 6:54:18 PM PST by Jet Jaguar (Who would the terrorists vote for?)
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To: SeekAndFind

Would that American Methodists had one such man of God...especially about the time they were angling to get Elian Gonzales sent back to communist slavery.


7 posted on 12/23/2008 6:54:44 PM PST by Gurn (Remember Mountain Meadows.)
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To: SeekAndFind

5 times bigger than my own megachurch.

Merry Christmas.


8 posted on 12/23/2008 6:55:25 PM PST by A_Former_Democrat
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To: SeekAndFind

I’m in a university town in the Midwest. Every Korean I’ve met, either international student or homegrown, is a Christian. This was the same on campus in Seattle.


9 posted on 12/23/2008 6:56:10 PM PST by radiohead (Buy ammo, get your kids out of government schools, pray for the Republic.)
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To: Always Right

>And if we would have won Vietnam, there would be another hotbed of Christianity.
>But instead the region is largely controlled run by communists and muslims.

Viet Nam and Japan may well be the biggest lost opportunities of the Church in America.


10 posted on 12/23/2008 7:05:37 PM PST by OneWingedShark (Q: Why am I here? A: To do Justly, to love mercy, and to walk humbly with my God.)
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To: SeekAndFind

I will never forget when my car died right in the middle of heavy traffic in Ft. Walton Bch. The only person to stop and help was a Korean Baptist preacher.

We pushed it to the median and he drove me to a repair shop where I got it towed. Always remember Koreans with a pleasant thought since then.


11 posted on 12/23/2008 7:08:07 PM PST by yarddog
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To: Always Right

Vietnam is full of Christians. They held a mass public demonstration against the government just a few days ago.

Vietnam is a Catholic country, and when the Commies are gone, look out.


12 posted on 12/23/2008 8:08:17 PM PST by B-Chan (Catholic. Monarchist. Texan. Any questions?)
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To: Always Right

The “Korean Pentecost” happened in 1907, well before the Korean war was even a glimmer in anyone’s eye. By the time that war did come around the native church was already fully established, if I’m not mistaken the center of the Christian community was Pyongyang, which makes it truly sad what’s happened to the place and the Christians that live there.


13 posted on 12/23/2008 10:24:01 PM PST by eclecticEel (In short, I want Obama given the same respect and deference that Democrats have given George Bush)
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To: eclecticEel
By the time that war did come around the native church was already fully established, if I’m not mistaken the center of the Christian community was Pyongyang, which makes it truly sad what’s happened to the place and the Christians that live there.

You're right. Pyongyang was called the Jerusalem of the Far East because of how strong Christianity was there.

The Pyongyang Revival 100 Years Later

Pyongyang, Jerusalem of the East

14 posted on 12/23/2008 11:52:17 PM PST by Tamar1973 (Riding the Korean Wave, one Bae Yong Joon drama at a time!)
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To: radiohead

I had noticed that most Koreans I’ve met were Christians also.I asked a Korean acquaintance about this because I thought most were Buddhists originally(I recall this from being stationed near the Korean White Horse Division in Nam)and she told me mostly only the older people followed Buddhism as a religion,although many cultural practices like funeral customs,etc. were still followed.Interesting.


15 posted on 12/24/2008 7:35:22 AM PST by steamroller
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To: steamroller

This from Wikipedia :


As of 2005, approximately 46.5% of the South Korean population express no religious preference.[127]

29.3% of the population is Christian (18.3% profess to being Protestants and 10.9% to be Catholics), 22.8% are Buddhist, and the rest adheres to Islam and various new religious movements including Jeungism, Daesunism, Cheondoism and Wonbuddhism.

The largest Christian church in South Korea, Yoido Full Gospel Church, is located in Seoul and has approximately 780,000 members (2003 estimate). Including Yoido Full Gospel, 11 of the world’s 12 largest churches are located in Seoul (see Christianity in Korea). With nearly four million followers, Roman Catholicism may be the fastest growing religion since the late 1980s.[128] South Korea is also the second largest missionary sending nation on earth, after the US.[129]

Islam in Korea is estimated to be at 45,000 in addition to some 100,000 foreign workers from Muslim countries,[130] particularly Bangladesh and Pakistan.[131]

A growing number of South Koreans adhere to new religious movements. Among these are Cheondoism (0.1%), Jeungism (0.07%) and Daesunjinrihoe.[127] These religions have developed as a reaction to the influence of Christianity and Western culture in Korean society. The exact figures of the amount of followers of these new religions remain controversial.


16 posted on 12/24/2008 9:54:54 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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