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The Warm Turns
IBD Editorials ^ | December 30, 2008

Posted on 12/30/2008 5:55:12 PM PST by Kaslin

Climate Change: The Earth has been warming ever since the end of the Little Ice Age. But guess what: Researchers say mankind is to blame for that, too.


s we've noted, 2008 has been a year of records for cold and snowfall and may indeed be the coldest year of the 21st century thus far. In the U.S., the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration registered 63 local snowfall records and 115 lowest-ever temperatures for the month of October.

Global thermometers stopped rising after 1998, and have plummeted in the last two years by more than 0.5 degrees Celsius. The 2007-2008 temperature drop was not predicted by global climate models. But it was predictable by a decline in sunspot activity since 2000.

When the sun is active, it's not uncommon to see sunspot numbers of 100 or more in a single month. Every 11 years, activity slows, and numbers briefly drop near zero. Normally sunspots return very quickly, as a new cycle begins. But this year, the start of a new cycle, the sun has been eerily quiet.

The first seven months averaged a sunspot count of only three and in August there were no sunspots at all — zero — something that has not occurred since 1913.

According to the publication Daily Tech, in the past 1,000 years, three previous such events — what are called the Dalton, Maunder and Sporer Minimums — have all led to rapid cooling. One was large enough to be called the Little Ice Age (1500-1750).

(Excerpt) Read more at ibdeditorials.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: bigmoney; climatechange; climatecycles; cooling; globalcooling; globalwarming; gorebullwarming; ibd; littleiceage; noaa; solaractivity; solarcycle; sunspotactivity; sunspots

1 posted on 12/30/2008 5:55:12 PM PST by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin
It's not global warming anymore, it's climate change. Now any weather event can be used to impose draconian restrictions. Yippee! </sarc>
2 posted on 12/30/2008 6:10:24 PM PST by sig226 (1/21/12 . . . He's not my president . . . Impeach Obama . . . whatever)
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To: Kaslin
According to Bird and Nevle, before Columbus ruined paradise, native Americans had deforested a significant portion of the continent and converted the land to agricultural purposes. Less CO2 was then absorbed from the atmosphere, and the earth was toasty.

Gosh, there's a problem with that there time-line. Since the forests in the U.S. have increased dramatically since the 19th century (as farms have given way to trees), America's temperatures should have been plunging since the 1880s. Meanwhile, the liberals have been swearing to us—since James Hansen's debut as a liar-for-hire in the summer of 1988—that the earth has been turning to a great ball of fire during that time.

3 posted on 12/30/2008 6:16:34 PM PST by SamuraiScot
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To: Kaslin; Defendingliberty; Genesis defender; WL-law; Normandy; TenthAmendmentChampion; FrPR; ...
 



Beam Me to Planet Gore !

4 posted on 12/30/2008 6:23:39 PM PST by steelyourfaith
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To: sig226
It's not global warming anymore, it's climate change.

Recently, I came across a global warmist calling it "climate disruption".

When they keep changing the terminology--- you know they're losing the argument.

5 posted on 12/30/2008 6:41:24 PM PST by melt (Someday they'll wish their Jihad... Jihadn't.)
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To: SamuraiScot
There's a lag ~ what happened was that almost simultaneously with the European discovery of the Americas plagues of what was probably hanta virus destroyed about 95% of the population.

Agriculture STOPPED; CO2 production declined dramatically and Earth cooled down (Little Ice Age) ~ coincidentally with the lack of Sunspots.

The Americas were repopulated with immigrants from Eur-Asia-Africa and agriculture was restarted.

Lo and behold, Earth started warming up.

The cooling and heating occur slowly.

In the background of all this we were already rapidly hurtling toward the next major glaciation ~ which is now way overdue ~ and human agriculture appears to have stopped the glaciers from growing, which is OK by me if not you or others.

We are sitting on the precipice of 100,000 more years of a dry, dusty, cold climate with half the globe iced over. Stoke those fires. Bring on the coal!

6 posted on 12/30/2008 7:14:07 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: melt

Jihadn’t? That is so funny. Thanks


7 posted on 12/30/2008 7:33:08 PM PST by SkipW
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To: muawiyah

Check out Robert Felix's latest book. It's another well researched tome. He does a nice job of spotting the periodic patterns. At every extinction boundary there is a layer of soot, coal, heavy metals and radioactive elements. The living things above the boundary appear fully formed. No incremental evolution. Each boundary also shows a magnetic reversal in the alignment of magnetic lines in the solidified rock. The living things that survive from the previous layer have characteristically low rates of metabolism. They survive well through periods of intense radiation.

Not to spoil the plot, but we're due for another reversal. Soon.

8 posted on 12/30/2008 9:28:31 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: Myrddin

Just finished this book about 3 weeks ago. Fascinating. I could have used some more footnotes and cites, but hey, well worth the read anyway.


9 posted on 12/30/2008 9:33:14 PM PST by TonyStark
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To: Kaslin

I don’t know if I can get more tired of these Left Wing climate Nazis who don’t know WTF they’re talking about.


10 posted on 12/30/2008 9:34:32 PM PST by Post Toasties (It's not a smear if it's true.)
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To: muawiyah
We are sitting on the precipice of 100,000 more years of a dry, dusty, cold climate with half the globe iced over. Stoke those fires. Bring on the coal!

I believe the magnetic reversal is a simple consequence of the orbital path of our solar system through the galaxy. Unless you can find a way to fly the whole solar system through a different path, this event is unstoppable. As humans, we have the intelligence and means to build shelters and stash food to survive. It's a matter of whether we're caught up in some silly game of political control (anthropogenic global warming) or paying attention to the scientific phenomena that are actually occurring.

The ice age "pacemaker" runs at a periodicity of 11,500 years. Ditto for the reversals. Have a look at the oxygen isotope plots. We're overdue for an ice age.

Magnetic reversal chart

11 posted on 12/30/2008 9:40:31 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: TonyStark
Felix documents the heck out of his books.
12 posted on 12/30/2008 9:41:41 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: SamuraiScot

I saw a show on either TLC or Discovery during the early 1990s. They used satellite imaging to examine soil reflectivity and infer what used to be there by the soil composition. They were also able to enhance the images to show travel routes. The travel routes corresponded to soil that would not form in a plain. There used to be forests there. The Indians chopped down the trees and turned it into the Great Plains.

It makes sense, really. Indians used wood for fuel, tools, and housing. They didn’t understand forestry, no matter how politically correct it is to say that they did. Ecology as science hadn’t been invented.

The PC police must not have liked it. I only saw it once.


13 posted on 12/30/2008 9:51:55 PM PST by sig226 (1/21/12 . . . He's not my president . . . Impeach Obama . . . whatever)
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To: Myrddin

The major peaks in your oxygen isotope chart occur at distances of 80,000 to 120,000 years apart. Do you have an explanation for that?


14 posted on 12/30/2008 9:58:00 PM PST by Rocky
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To: sig226
"global warming"..."threatened or endangered species"...."diversity"....the Rats and leftists are good at coming up with words or phrases that they can blind side people with and if they keep repeating them often enough, eventually the people will start to believe......

folks....we here in Eastern Washington have gotten the most snow the last two weeks than ever recorded for a December.......at our place I know we've had at least 4 feet of snow...several major buildings have had roof cave ins and the roads are a mess....one friend who lives closer to town than I has not rec'd any mail for a week, because their street has not been plowed....

we would like a week of warming...Paging Algore...paging Algore...

15 posted on 12/30/2008 10:03:56 PM PST by cherry
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To: SamuraiScot

I’ve been told that America was so forested when the first settlers came that they resorted to forest fires to gain land for crops.....


16 posted on 12/30/2008 10:05:34 PM PST by cherry
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To: Rocky
Let me point you to Robert Felix's site. It's a lot faster than trying to distill, copy and paste. See Ice Age Now site link.

Major magnetic reversals happen on 250,000 year boundaries.

17 posted on 12/30/2008 10:12:05 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: Kaslin

Sunspots are people! They’re people!!!

Oh wait. Never mind. Wrong sci-fi movie. But people do cause Global Warming and since Global Warming is also caused by sunspots, therefore:

Sunspots are people! They’re people!!!


18 posted on 12/30/2008 11:46:12 PM PST by FastCoyote (I am intolerant of the intolerable.)
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To: sig226
The Indians chopped down the trees and turned it into the Great Plains.

This is absurd fantasy for some weird and unclear purpose. The fact is the Great Plains have been too arid to support forestation, in recorded history. Without irrigation and ample groundwaters they would be unpopulated deserts today.

Beyond that, the idea of Indians, without so much as iron tools, chopping down hundreds of thousands of square miles of forest is beyond ridiculous.

I hope you were being facetious and I just missed the humor in the lateness of the hour.

19 posted on 12/30/2008 11:59:39 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: cherry
I’ve been told that America was so forested when the first settlers came that they resorted to forest fires to gain land for crops.....

Injuns did the same thing in New England, and apparently other places as well (see below). Not just for crops, but to increase the browse for deer—lots of yummy buds and berry bushes grow in disturbed areas. No big surprise, since "slash-and-burn agriculture" is what Indians in Central America practice to this day.

20 posted on 12/31/2008 4:06:31 AM PST by SamuraiScot
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To: hinckley buzzard
Beyond that, the idea of Indians, without so much as iron tools, chopping down hundreds of thousands of square miles of forest is beyond ridiculous.

Actually, Indians imported beavers to chop down the forests. Of course, that implies that beavers were the first illegal aliens, doing the work that Indians didn't want to do.

History Channel's been showing a two hour documentary on the Little Ice Age. It confirmed my belief that the actions of mankind have a very limited impact on global warming.

21 posted on 12/31/2008 4:26:06 AM PST by Night Hides Not (Don't blame me...I voted for Palin!)
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To: SamuraiScot
In the book Reading the Forested Landscape, the author points to signs in geography and landscape that indicates that the natives did controlled burns of forest floors every single year.
22 posted on 12/31/2008 5:36:19 AM PST by mvpel (Michael Pelletier)
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To: hinckley buzzard

I’m not being facetious and it isn’t absurd. The timetable was lengthy. And yes, given a thousand years, you could deforst a large region, especially if you wasted the trees and fiddled with the envirnoment.


23 posted on 12/31/2008 6:42:58 AM PST by sig226 (1/21/12 . . . He's not my president . . . Impeach Obama . . . whatever)
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To: Kaslin

The global warming hoax is just like the Y2K hoax - both government directed and based on assumption, theory and hype. Both cost corporations millions of unnecessary expenses.


24 posted on 12/31/2008 6:51:26 AM PST by grayhog
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To: grayhog

Y2k was not a hoax. Myriad computer systems used two-digit years, and could not cope properly with date calculations involving year 2000 dates.

Just because there were no problems with major, visible impact to the public doesn’t mean there were no problems.


25 posted on 12/31/2008 10:02:01 AM PST by mvpel (Michael Pelletier)
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To: mvpel

The Y2K hoax was not that computers weren’t using 2 digit years, it was the hype and panic over the coming armegeddon. Its similar to global warming in that the hoax is not that the planet warmed a little over the last 20 years, its the hype and panic over the coming armegeddon.


26 posted on 12/31/2008 11:30:28 AM PST by grayhog
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To: mvpel
In the book Reading the Forested Landscape, the author points to signs in geography and landscape that indicates that the natives did controlled burns of forest floors every single year.

Thanks, I'll check it out!

In a vaguely related note, I also recall reading a journal article on early landscaping by English settlers here. In the Northeast, they found a landscape of bogs and swamps ("wetlands," man), and consolidated them into streams and ponds in order to build tens of thousands of mills and the settlements that grew up around them. Besides powering saw- and grain mills, there was another huge benefit: Mankind 1; mosquitoes 0.

Bad, by tree-hugger standards. Good, by sane ones.

27 posted on 12/31/2008 1:08:31 PM PST by SamuraiScot
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