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To: Coyoteman
Heck, I'll even give it a try! This series finishes at the top with the common Shetland Collie, but started 30 million years ago with the Chiwawarex Snipicanus, first discovered in 1927 by Leroy Buffoonoxi in a West Pyranees dig. While not being as open to scientific interpretation as a few fragements of skull and a couple of teeth, the complete skull in convincing in it's own right.








39 posted on 01/23/2009 11:57:35 AM PST by jimmyray
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To: jimmyray

Most fascianting is the gradual evolution of the eye sockets to actually retain the ball within the skull, and the gradual lengthening of the jaw for better catching and holding of prey. Also note the grdual development of more prominent canines. The evolution of the lengthened snout also contributes to improve olfactory funtion, thus giving the modern canis a highly adapted sense of smell.


40 posted on 01/23/2009 12:01:33 PM PST by jimmyray
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To: jimmyray
Heck, I'll even give it a try! This series finishes at the top with the common Shetland Collie,...

I know you think you're being funny, but you're really embarrassing yourself. You have no idea what kind of work goes into figuring out how old a skull is, do you? Let me ask the thing I always wonder: do you have any expertise in anything? Has your study or work made you more knowledgeable about anything than your average Internet user? If so, wouldn't you think that someone who just dismissed everything you know was acting pretty foolishly?

57 posted on 01/23/2009 3:34:22 PM PST by Ha Ha Thats Very Logical
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