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Mexico condemns US 'corruption' (Barfer!)
AlJazeera ^ | Mar. 6, 2009 | AlJazeera

Posted on 03/06/2009 10:16:24 AM PST by AuntB

The Mexican president has blamed US "corruption" for hampering his nation's efforts to combat violent drug cartels.

Felipe Calderon also told the AFP news agency that the main cause of Mexico's drug gang problems was "having the world's biggest consumer [of drugs] next to us".

"Drug trafficking in the United States is fuelled by the phenomenon of corruption on the part of the American authorities," he said on Wednesday.

The Mexican president launched a massive assault on drug cartels after entering office in late 2006 but the cartels have responded with campaigns of violence and intimidation that left 6,000 dead in 2008 alone and around 1,000 in 2009 so far.

Calderon acknowledged some Mexican officials had helped the cartels but said the US should ask itself how many of its own officials were implicated.

"It is not an exclusively Mexican problem, it is a common problem between Mexico and the United States," he said.

"I want to know how many American officials have been prosecuted for this [corruption]."

Border concerns

Mexico has deployed thousands of troops in a bid to quell drugs violence [Reuters] Calderon, who has deployed more than 36,000 troops to the troubled Mexico-US border regions to crack down on violence, also said that the US must halt the flow of weapons into Mexico, where the police and security services are often outgunned.

But he said recent talks with Barack Obama, the US president, had provided "a clearer, more decisive response, one which matches the magnitude of the problem which we face," he said.

Mexican border cities, such as Ciudad Juarez have suffered the brunt of the violence prompting concerns in Washington that the killings and attacks could cross over into the US.

On Wednesday at least 20 people were killed during a prison riot in the city sparked by violence between rival gangs.

Mexican authorities have said they plan to have around 7,500 troops deployed in Ciudad Juarez by the end of this week in a bid to quell the violence, along with 2,000 in the rest of Chihuahua state.

Calderon's comments come as Admiral Mike Mullen, head of the US military, is due to visit Mexico this week as the US is to step up military and other assistance to Mexico in its battle against the cartels.

In February the US department of justice said US and Mexican authorities had arrested 750 people over 21 months in an anti-drug sweep, including 52 members of Mexico's Sinaloa drug cartel.


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Foreign Affairs; Mexico
KEYWORDS: aliens; drugcartels; drugwarconsequences; hubris; juarez; mexico; nomoreacupulco; thankprohibition; warnextdoor; yankeestayhome
Anyone out there STILL believe that Mexico is our 'friend'?

Remember Mexico votes against us in the UN all the time.

They are a country of socialist/liberals...it's ALWAYS someone else's fault...and the blame is usually put on the only people trying to help.

We need to keep the billions in aid we send Mexico (not to mention the care of their migrant citizens!) and tell them to just shut up!

1 posted on 03/06/2009 10:16:25 AM PST by AuntB
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To: AuntB

I bet Oboy is really gonna rip into this guy, just you wait and see.....


2 posted on 03/06/2009 10:17:52 AM PST by Pietro
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To: SwinneySwitch; Travis McGee; Clintonfatigued; bcsco; gubamyster; All

“”It is not an exclusively Mexican problem, it is a common problem between Mexico and the United States,” he said.

“I want to know how many American officials have been prosecuted for this [corruption].” “

Build the fence! Build it tall!


3 posted on 03/06/2009 10:18:14 AM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

Death rasping.


4 posted on 03/06/2009 10:20:51 AM PST by Dallas59 ("You know the one with the big ears? He might be yours, but he ain't my president.")
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Comment #5 Removed by Moderator

To: AuntB
It's a damned good thing I wasn't elected president.

I would have recalled my ambassador to Mexico immediately and would have appointed John Bolton as Secretary of Defense.

We'd be working overtime on SDI, putting Iran out of business and paying attention to our main SA ally: Colombia.

The Monroe Doctrine would be enforced and Cuber would be put on notice to load the Castro Brothers on a boat headed for Miami, or else!

We'd have to face the music as far as Russia and China is concerned and emphatically state that things will change or we'll have to have that showdown now. Too damned bad it didn't happen in 1945!

Then I'd put a padlock on both houses of Congress and tell them as Alberto Fujimori told his parliament: "Leave! You're getting in my way!"

Then I'd probably wake up from this pleasant dream.

6 posted on 03/06/2009 10:27:34 AM PST by IbJensen (In 2008, Americans foolishly used their freedom to vote for “chains” not “change.”)
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To: AuntB

Caution. This is Al Jazeera reporting on some AFP reported. Two suspect sources of information right off the bat. We don’t send billions of aid to Mexico, we send nothing, never have, with the exception of the recent Merida initiative funding, which is being paid to fight our drug war. What we do is allow their peons to come here and take advantage to the tune of billions. Calderon is not from the socialist-lib side of Mexican politics, exactly the opposite. He comes under heavy attack domestically for his free market policies. He is significantly to the right of most of the Mexican populace, which voted him (and Fox) in because the PRI was suicidally corrupt, and not for economic reasons. Knowing AFP, and knowing Al Jazeera, I have serious doubts about the accuracy of this story. Countries don’t have friends, they have common interests.


7 posted on 03/06/2009 10:28:30 AM PST by La Lydia
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To: IbJensen

I did enjoy your little dream!


8 posted on 03/06/2009 10:29:10 AM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB
Don't count on the Justice Department to lend much help in the way it should...with force.

Each state and some cities must take a 'granite-wall-stand' against illegal drugs. Our Judges must impose harsh laws and if need be our legislatures must enact those laws immediately. If I had my way, people who push drugs would face the death penalty first time arrested with no appeal...they deal in death so what's the difference, it is the same trigger for death. Otherwise, all Obama's "a clearer, more decisive response" is just so much hot air. Mexico? The drug cartels pretty much run that country so take them with a grain of salt...La Raza is culpable...

9 posted on 03/06/2009 10:33:14 AM PST by yoe
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To: La Lydia

“We don’t send billions of aid to Mexico, we send nothing, never have, with the exception of the recent Merida initiative funding, which is being paid to fight our drug war. What we do is allow their peons to come here and take advantage to the tune of billion”

Wrong. We send millions EVERY year. EVERY year. Look it up, I’ve posted it over the years.

http://www.heritage.org/research/tradeandeconomicfreedom/bg1186.cfm
“Mexico, whose economy was bailed out by the IMF under U.S. guidance and support in 1994, continues to receive some $15 million in foreign aid from the United States each year. Nevertheless, Mexico voted against the United States 62 percent of the time. “

As for Al Jazeera, this is NOTHING different than Calderon and the rest of his country say. For weeks, they’ve been bitching because ALL their problems are because of our gun laws and drug users.


10 posted on 03/06/2009 10:33:35 AM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

Pot, meet Kettle...


11 posted on 03/06/2009 10:35:31 AM PST by CPT Clay (Drill ANWR, Personal Accounts NOW ,)
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To: AuntB

Pot, kettle, black.


12 posted on 03/06/2009 10:37:59 AM PST by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: La Lydia

PLUS USAID to Mexico...

http://www.usaid.gov/locations/latin_america_caribbean/country/mexico/
USAID/Mexico manages a $28.9 million annual program of development cooperation in Mexico. For 2003-2008, USAID’s program supports Mexican development and reform initiatives in the following key areas:


13 posted on 03/06/2009 10:39:46 AM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

>> Felipe Calderon also told the AFP news agency that the main cause of Mexico’s drug gang problems was “having the world’s biggest consumer [of drugs] next to us”...”Drug trafficking in the United States is fuelled by the phenomenon of corruption on the part of the American authorities,” he said on Wednesday. <<

Well, he’s partially right. If it weren’t for the corrupt, open-borders crowd (Obama, McCain, Bush, Kennedy, etc.), law-enforcement would have a much better leg up at drug enforcement. Unfortunately, he’s part of that corruption so its cakehole time for him.


14 posted on 03/06/2009 10:43:05 AM PST by dangus
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To: AuntB

That’s the solution for this whiner.BUILD THE FENCE...(hopefully, with landmines, machine gun nests and rabid dogs)


15 posted on 03/06/2009 10:59:11 AM PST by max americana
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To: AuntB
Felipe Calderon also told the AFP news agency that the main cause of Mexico's drug gang problems was "having the world's biggest consumer [of drugs] next to us". "Drug trafficking in the United States is fuelled by the phenomenon of corruption on the part of the American authorities," he said on Wednesday.

Well, let's assume, for the sake of argument, that it's a rational argument.

Then let's prohibit the sending of American $s to Mexico by Mexican illegal aliens in the US, because the production of so much wealth triggers additional robberies in Mexico...

16 posted on 03/06/2009 11:26:16 AM PST by Publius6961 (Change is not a plan; Hope is not a strategy.)
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To: AuntB

Sounds like mex-a-hole is trying to get some 0ba-money.


17 posted on 03/06/2009 11:27:41 AM PST by theymakemesick (Buraq (buh- rok) Winged creature that carried mohammed on his Night Journey from Mecca to Jerusalem)
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To: AuntB

This could be an opportunity, AuntB.

Why don’t we deport about 20 million of his expatriates to Ciudad Juarez to help him with the crime problem?


18 posted on 03/06/2009 11:30:42 AM PST by calcowgirl ("Liberalism is just Communism sold by the drink." P. J. O'Rourke)
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To: AuntB

Am I the only person that sees this guys name and think of the dope dealer on Miami Vice?


19 posted on 03/06/2009 11:31:11 AM PST by sticker
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To: AuntB
Build the fence! Build it tall!

Negative. We need those folks from the Eastern part of Germany to rebuild the Berlin Wall. Only this time put it on the border between the U.S. and Mexico.

20 posted on 03/06/2009 11:32:18 AM PST by scooter2 (I'll die on my feet before I live on my knees.)
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To: AuntB; La Lydia
Heritage.org

Notable opponents of the United States in the U.N. include the following recipients of U.S. foreign assistance:

... Mexico, which received a $50 billion multilateral bailout thanks to U.S. urging in 1994 ...

21 posted on 03/06/2009 11:36:45 AM PST by calcowgirl ("Liberalism is just Communism sold by the drink." P. J. O'Rourke)
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To: calcowgirl

They paid it back with interest.


22 posted on 03/06/2009 1:00:18 PM PST by La Lydia
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To: AuntB

Al Jazeera? LOL! Wow, that’s perfect!


23 posted on 03/06/2009 1:02:11 PM PST by TADSLOS ( Join the Conservative Revolution! http://falconparty.com/)
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To: Publius6961

Yes. For years I have been saying we should charge a healthy tax on all money being sent out of the country, and put that money to use paying for the medical bills and other taxpayer-provided goods and services that go to immigrants. Unfortunately, the money-wire companies have bought and paid for both the House and Senate banking committees that control this, to my direct knowledge going back to the early 1990s. They make billions, we pay the bills. Now the Fairfax County Federal Credit Union is advertising on Spanish TV here for new Hispanics members to join by promising them FREE MONEY TRANSFERS, which doubtless all of the credit union shareholders will get to pay for, because as we know, nothing is free.


24 posted on 03/06/2009 1:05:33 PM PST by La Lydia
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To: yoe
“Each state and some cities must take a ‘granite-wall-stand’ against illegal drugs. Our Judges must impose harsh laws and if need be our legislatures must enact those laws immediately. If I had my way, people who push drugs would face the death penalty first time arrested with no appeal...they deal in death so what's the difference, it is the same trigger for death. Otherwise, all Obama’s “a clearer, more decisive response” is just so much hot air...”

That's right. If we'd just try a little harder we could wipe out the problem of illegal drugs. We need more leaders like good old chairman Mao Zedong to turn this into a great country worth living in. If our government would just emulate his government, we'd cut the drug problem way down. Short of that it will all just be half measures that will never do much good. We need to get the people to all inform on each other, tow the party line or face execution or being sent off to reeducation camps. You're right about appeals too. We don't need no stinkin’ right of appeal. Shoot, we shouldn't be wasting a lot of time with trials either. If we suspect someone is using or dealing in illegal drugs, we could just shoot them in the back of the head or send them off the a reeducation camps just like the Chinese did. The drug problem would shrink down to almost nothing just like it did in China. Wouldn't it be great to live in a country like that? Of course the Chinese are seeing a resurgence in their drug problem because they've gotten too soft. Now they are talking about get tough again. Good old China. Why can't we be more like them?

I'm kidding of course. I'm from an area where they really are hard on people involved with illegal drugs, compared to much of the rest of the nation. They aren't executing people of course but selling any amount of a drug like cocaine or meth can get you life sentence in my state and the prosecutors and judges tend to be really hard on folks in drug cases. Most of the people going to prison in my area are going for drug crimes and they're getting long sentences. Selling a tiny bit of dope to another doper will get someone a lot more time than burglarizing homes in my area and every time we have arraignments in court we'll have along line of folks there on drug charges, more than any other type of charge. It doesn't make drugs expensive or hard to get in my area, but at least we can say we're tough on drugs.

It's all just half measures though. For us to ever make a real difference we're going to have to become something like Chairman Mao's China. The good people of this country, hopefully, will never stand for that. We'll look more and more like Mao's China as we slowly crank up the drug war, but long before we ever get to the point we'd need to get to to achieve the kind of results you are after the people of this country will have had enough.

We will never make illegal drugs go away. It's not possible to make them go away completely anywhere and it's not possible to put a big dent in the problem just by cranking up the drug war another notch and another notch until we finally reach the desired results and remain a free country that doesn't resemble Mao's China.

Pat Buchanan just did an article where he said we have to go Milton Friedman's way or Mao Zedong's way, legalization or Maoist solution. http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2200610/posts I don't think we need to legalize all drugs. We just need to recognize the limitations of the drug war, recognize that we quickly reach the point of diminishing returns trying to arrest and incarcerate our way out of the problem if we aren't going to go all out with the Maoist solution. We just blow a fortune, overfill our prisons such that we don't have room to house people who really need to be there for the good of us all, and achieve no better results than we did before we cranked up the drug war the last few notches.

With the exception of marijuana, not many people are using illegal drugs in this country. It's a very small percentage of our population. Personally, I think we should just legalize pot because it doesn't cause that many problems for innocent people and because we completely failing in our efforts to make it hard to find and drive up the price such that people either can't afford to try it or can't afford to use it regularly. That drug is cheap on a per use basis and easy to find anywhere in this country. The likelihood that a pot smoker will get caught is slim and if he does get caught odds are he's going to get basically a slap on the wrist because that's just the way it works in most parts of the country now. People aren't deterred by the law and most who want to smoke it already smoke it. I think we'd have a lot more control over it if we regulated the industry and in so doing we'd deprive these Mexican cartels of most of their income. According to the ONDCP about 62% of their gross receipts from drugs bound for the U.S. About another 28% comes from cocaine but they're just the middlemen for that drug which must first be purchased and smuggled from South America before it is smuggled into this country. Take pot away from them and they will be smaller, less powerful, and far less of a threat in Mexico and here. http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/022208dnintdrugs

As for the other drugs it's just a problem we are going to have to manage and we should try to do it without breaking the bank and without turning into Chairman Mao's China. We could start by trying to use common sense and science to guide our drug policies rather than our emotions. When we let our fear and frustration take over all we get are more laws making more things criminal acts, increasing the punishments on existing crimes, using twisted logic to justify encroachments on constitutional protections, etc. We keep cranking it up and it costs us more and more financially and otherwise yet the drugs keep flowing just like they were before.

25 posted on 03/06/2009 1:19:50 PM PST by TKDietz
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To: AuntB

Mexico knows corruption when they see it. They wrote the book!


26 posted on 03/06/2009 1:21:44 PM PST by elpadre (nation)
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To: AuntB

And of course, when Mexico completely collapses, this lowlife batnard will want political asylum in the US.


27 posted on 03/06/2009 1:24:18 PM PST by Levante
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To: sticker

“Am I the only person that sees this guys name and think of the dope dealer on Miami Vice?”

I call this jerk Flippy Cabron.


28 posted on 03/06/2009 1:27:13 PM PST by Levante
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To: La Lydia
We don’t send billions of aid to Mexico

Actually we do! Sounds like you're reporting for Al Jazeera!

29 posted on 03/06/2009 2:45:13 PM PST by Marine Inspector
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To: AuntB

Being condemned for corruption by Mexico is like being lectured on morality by the adult film industry.


30 posted on 03/06/2009 3:00:08 PM PST by Clintonfatigued (If greed is a virtue, than corporate socialism is conservative)
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To: Clintonfatigued

“Being condemned for corruption by Mexico is like being lectured on morality by the adult film industry.”

Tag line material!!


31 posted on 03/06/2009 3:11:52 PM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB

Excellent idea, and that’s exactly what I will do.


32 posted on 03/06/2009 3:18:03 PM PST by Clintonfatigued (Being condemned for corruption by Mexico is like being lectured on morality by the adult film indust)
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To: Clintonfatigued

Didn’t have enough space.


33 posted on 03/06/2009 3:20:39 PM PST by Clintonfatigued (Being condemned for corruption by Mexico is like being lectured on morals by the adult film industy)
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To: Marine Inspector

Please identify, aside from the Merida initiative money. In fact, we do not provide foreign aid to Mexico. You can go back and look at the Foreign Operations Appropriations bills (where the foreign aid is funded) for three or four decades and you won’t find an earmark for Mexico. Mexico has, on occasion, provided foreign aid to Central America. We do fund a number of U.N. initiatives that Mexico benefits from, such as the lovely family planning programs and several agricultural projects. We have provided them, in the past, with law enforcement equipment for the war on drugs, which it could be argued was an investment in our own interests. In 1995 we funded a bailout of the Mexican economy to the tune of $50 billion in loan guarantees to shore up the peso. Mexico paid that back with interest, two years later and two years before it came due. If you had bothered to look at my earlier posts, you would have seen that I consider Al Jazeera AND AFP to be suspect sources of reliable information.


34 posted on 03/06/2009 4:37:14 PM PST by La Lydia
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To: IbJensen

I vote for you.


35 posted on 03/06/2009 4:38:34 PM PST by La Lydia
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To: AuntB; 1_Inch_Group; 2sheep; 2Trievers; 3AngelaD; 3pools; 3rdcanyon; 4Freedom; 4ourprogeny; ...

Ping!

Another foreign policy disaster just waiting to explode...


36 posted on 03/06/2009 8:41:34 PM PST by HiJinx (~ Support Our Troops ~ www.AmericaSupportsYou.mil ~)
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To: HiJinx
Calderon may have a point......remember Mena Airport?

The names Clinton, Tyson; Lassiter and Seal come to mind.
37 posted on 03/06/2009 8:55:16 PM PST by BIGLOOK (Keelhaul Congress! It's the sensible solution to restore Command to the People.)
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To: AuntB

The only element that keeps the cartels in business are the users, so the logical thing to do is start prosecuting users on this side of the border: Jail them and put the producers and the pushers out of business.

Why doesn’t that get done?


38 posted on 03/07/2009 9:23:57 AM PST by Marauder (Politicians use words the way squids use ink.)
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To: Marauder

“Jail them and put the producers and the pushers out of business.

Why doesn’t that get done?”

Not enough jails. We can’t even get the gang bangers locked up or deported. No society has ever stopped addiction. We won’t either. The idea it can be stopped is pure fantasy. The supply, however, can be stopped.


39 posted on 03/07/2009 9:39:46 AM PST by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Marauder
“The only element that keeps the cartels in business are the users, so the logical thing to do is start prosecuting users on this side of the border: Jail them and put the producers and the pushers out of business.

Why doesn’t that get done?”

We do prosecute users. Something like a million people were busted for drug possession last year, 700,000 or so for possession of marijuana. We don't put people in jail much for possession though, especially marijuana possession, and that's the drug these Mexican cartels make most of their money from. Aside from the fact that we don't have the jail space, and we really don't have the jail space, the majority think marijuana users should just be fined. The poll results show that only a small minority want people to go to jail for marijuana possession. Over 40% now want it to be legalized and regulated similar to alcohol, and that percentage is steadily growing. One recent poll had something like 42% for legalization, 46% for keeping it illegal, and the rest undecided. There isn't enough support for locking people up for smoking pot, so it's not going to happen, much. Eventually it's just going to be legalized and that really will hurt the cartels.

40 posted on 03/07/2009 5:36:47 PM PST by SmallGovRepub
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To: AuntB
“The supply, however, can be stopped.”

Do you really believe that? How are we going to stop the supply from coming in? We've tried for decades to do that with very little luck. We've spent many billions of dollars and an awful lot of manpower over the years and illegal drugs are as easily available as ever and have actually gotten cheaper and more pure in many cases. I just don't think it's possible to stop the flow of drugs, not with so many billions of dollars to be made. If we ever get the fence built that will help a little bit, but they'll still get the drugs in. They'll grow more pot here and they'll figure out how to get the cocaine, meth and heroin in. According to government estimates they bring in less than a thousand tons of all those drugs combined which really isn't that much when you think about it in terms of the volume that amount would fill. It's a couple of dozen tractor trailer loads. They'll cut holes in the fence. They'll use boats, planes, tunnels, submarines, remote controlled aircraft, etc. They'll bribe people at the border. No matter how well we seal the border there will always be cracks. We'll be able to stop the people who just walk across the border to come here to work, but not highly motivated drug smugglers who make many thousands for each load that will likely sell for millions in this country. I think the notion that we are going to stop that is pure fantasy. There is just too much demand and too much money to be made meeting that demand.

41 posted on 03/07/2009 5:57:28 PM PST by SmallGovRepub
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To: SmallGovRepub; AuntB
When I said they bring less than a “thousand tons of all those drugs combined” I was referring to cocaine, meth and heroin, not marijuana. They bring several thousand tons of that in every year. I just wanted to make that clear because it wasn't clear in my post.
42 posted on 03/07/2009 6:00:53 PM PST by SmallGovRepub
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To: SmallGovRepub
Eventually it's just going to be legalized and that really will hurt the cartels.

For how long? They'll just forget about marijuana at that point and get serious about coke and heroin, and you can't legalize all of it.

43 posted on 03/07/2009 7:49:12 PM PST by Marauder (Politicians use words the way squids use ink.)
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To: La Lydia; AuntB

I’m just going to go over a few years worth of some of the aid we’ve given Mexico. In fact, we’ve given aid to Mexico for decades and that aid continues today!

In 2001, USAID gave Mexico 7.885 million dollars for Development Assistance, 5.987 million dollars for Child Survival and Health Programs and 6.178 million dollars in Economic Support Funds.

In 2002, USAID gave Mexico 8.116 million dollars for Development Assistance, 9.500 million dollars for Child Survival and Health Programs and 10.000 million dollars in Economic Support Funds.

In 2003, USAID gave Mexico 13.224 million dollars for Development Assistance, 5.205 million dollars for Child Survival and Health Programs and 11.685 million dollars in Economic Support Funds.

In 2004, USAID gave Mexico 17.895 million dollars for Development Assistance, 3.700 million dollars for Child Survival and Health Programs and 11.432 million dollars in Economic Support Funds.

And yes, providing law enforcement equipment is aid, and it in no way, shape or form benefited the United States.


44 posted on 03/08/2009 9:21:36 AM PDT by Marine Inspector
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To: Marine Inspector

I have a a feeling about all that aid to Mexico...You ain’t seen nothin’ yet!

Good to see you, MI.

The following is a rueters article, can’t be posted, but interesting.

http://www.reuters.com/article/asiaCrisis/idUSN06397194

US military chief backs counter-insurgency for Mexico

It talks about the ‘support’ we will give Mexico. Mullen said he and his Mexican hosts did not discuss the possibility of placing U.S. troops on the U.S.-Mexican border, an idea suggested by Texas Gov. Rick Perry.


45 posted on 03/08/2009 9:33:56 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Marauder
They're already serious about those other drugs, and the fact that marijuana is illegal actually helps them distribute those other drugs because so many smoke pot that the distribution networks for it reach every corner of America. Most of these other drugs just piggy back into your town on top of the marijuana. Pot smokers end up getting offered these drugs by the same people that sell them pot. If we regulate production and sales of marijuana and have it sold through licensed shops pot smokers will be far less likely to be offered these other drugs and these cartels will have lost one of the best ways they have to get these drugs out to end consumers.

According to our government, about 90% of the cocaine consumed in this country comes through Mexico, is supplied by these organizations. They're also supplying most all the meth and heroin consumed here. They are serious about these drugs. But there is only a limited demand for them. Americans consume more marijuana than all these other illegal drug combined. The black market for illegal drugs is mostly a black market for marijuana. These other drugs are expensive and profit margins are high, but most of the money is coming from marijuana. According to the ONDCP, about 62% of their gross proceeds from drugs bound for the U.S. comes from marijuana. They gross about %28 of gross proceeds comes from the next biggest seller, cocaine, but that must first be purchased and smuggled from South America before they bring it here. They don't produce it like they produce the marijuana. The drug czar, John Walters, says marijuana is the “bread and butter,” “the center of gravity” for Mexican drug cartels. Taking marijuana from them would be a devastating blow to these organizations.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/022208dnintdrugs.3a98bb0.html

46 posted on 03/09/2009 4:41:39 AM PDT by SmallGovRepub
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To: La Lydia; AuntB
The silence is deafening!
47 posted on 03/11/2009 1:35:29 PM PDT by Marine Inspector
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