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In Mexico's drug wars, fears of a U.S. front
MSNBC ^ | Mar. 9, 2009 | Alex Johnson

Posted on 03/09/2009 10:06:41 AM PDT by AuntB

With U.S. forces fighting two wars abroad, the nation's top military officer made an important visit last week to forestall a third.

He went to Mexico.

Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, made the trip to confer with Mexican leaders about the Merida Initiative, a three-year plan signed into law last June to flood the U.S.-Mexican border region with $1.4 billion in U.S. assistance for law-enforcement training and equipment, as well as technical advice and training to bolster Mexico’s judicial system.

That’s about 100 people every week for the last 14 months. The cartels usually do not target civilians, but dozens, perhaps hundreds, have died in the crossfire.

“It’s a real war,” says Jorge Ramos, mayor of Tijuana, Mexico, across the border with San Diego. “We’re not faking.”

More important for the Obama administration, it is to keep the violence from spilling across the border more than it already has, especially in the border states of Texas, California, Arizona and New Mexico.

The concern is very real. Mexican drug cartels already control about 90 percent of the cocaine trade across the United States and most of the market for marijuana, methamphetamine and heroin, with operations in 230 cities, according to the U.S. Justice Department’s National Drug Intelligence Center.

(Excerpt) Read more at msnbc.msn.com ...


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Government; Mexico
KEYWORDS: aliens; drugwarconsequences; mexico; organizedcrime; terrorism; thankprohibition; wod
A poster asked yesterday how El Paso is doing with this going on across the border. Another article today talks about this.

El Paso cited as possible target

[snip]New fears are rolling across the region, stemming from recent indications by cartel leaders that they are prepared to extend their war across the border, most likely into Texas and Arizona.

Ciudad Juarez Mayor José Reyes Ferriz is a particular target. Earlier this year, drug lords killed six Ciudad Juarez police officers and threatened to continue killing one every 48 hours until Reyes removed Police Chief Roberto Orduña Cruz, an anti-cartel crusader, from his job.

El Paso cited as possible target

New fears are rolling across the region, stemming from recent indications by cartel leaders that they are prepared to extend their war across the border, most likely into Texas and Arizona.

Reyes took the threats seriously. He is rumored to have moved his family to El Paso, seeking U.S. protection. El Paso Mayor John Cook promised that the city would take whatever measures were needed to protect Reyes’ family, but the cartel behind the threat said that would make no difference.

“Reyes Ferriz you made a good decision to let go of the pig, but if you continue to support those pigs and helping those people (you know who we’re talking about) we will not ask you to resign,” said signs posted in the city. “We will cut off your head along with your family even if they are in El Paso, Texas.”

U.S. and Mexican officials have called Ciudad Juarez a city in chaos...... “I have been screaming at the top of my lungs to anyone who would listen to me for well over a year that this was coming,” Fleming said last week in an interview with MSNBC TV. “Why just now the federal government is getting a hold of this and doing something about it — I don’t have that answer.”

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29516551/page/2/

1 posted on 03/09/2009 10:06:42 AM PDT by AuntB
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To: AuntB
What's this? Now the Mexican Government wants us to provide them with police forces as well?
2 posted on 03/09/2009 10:10:08 AM PDT by prismsinc (A.K.A. "The Terminator"!)
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To: prismsinc

I’ve long been a fan of the notion that “if you don’t understand something, get rid of it.”... Foreign or Domestic.


3 posted on 03/09/2009 10:14:15 AM PDT by Finop (Never argue with an idiot. They drag you down to their level and then beat you with experience.)
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To: prismsinc

“What’s this? Now the Mexican Government wants us to provide them with police forces as well?”

Well, yes. After all, the problems in Mexico (according to them!) are ALL our fault...our guns get down there!

I’ve been thinking about this ‘gun’ angle the Mexicans are pushing. We both know any US citizen going into Mexico with a gun or even ammunition is going to jail. If guns are coming into Mexico from the US it’s under the guidance of those in charge in Mexico and they darn well know it!
That old excuse just doesn’t fly.


4 posted on 03/09/2009 10:15:17 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: AuntB
'New fears are rolling across the region, stemming from recent indications by cartel leaders that they are prepared to extend their war across the border, most likely into Texas and Arizona' the US will never win this...because they will not fight fire with fire...they are too nice.

I say turn just a few Marines loose down there and let them take care of business, and that means playing dirty, killing, kicking some a$$ and taking NO names....

5 posted on 03/09/2009 10:18:41 AM PDT by nbhunt
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To: AuntB

Jorge Bush wanted to make Mexico our partner. Probably still does. Sheer insanity. If I were president I would have fences up everywhere they were needed within one year.

Keep Mexico in Mexico!
They are running out of crude which all they are any good for


6 posted on 03/09/2009 10:18:58 AM PDT by dennisw (Archimedes--- Give me a lever long enough and a fulcrum to place it, and I shall move the Earth)
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To: prismsinc

We should provide the Mexican government with an impenetrable wall of US forces on our side of the border. That way we can guarantee the violence will not spill over into America. Beyond that, if they want our help inside Mexico, it should be by the application of overwhelming force against the cartels. Take no prisoners, ask no questions. Apache gunships over ciudad Juarez. Smoking ruins in the roads. And no more complaints about border security or US gun shows.


7 posted on 03/09/2009 10:19:12 AM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: prismsinc

I would also add that if they want our help inside Mexico, they must provide us with the precise locations of all the cartel leaders’ residences and warehouses, and guarantee us immunity. Clear and present danger.


8 posted on 03/09/2009 10:22:58 AM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: AuntB
U.S.-trained forces reportedly helping Mexican cartels (link to Free Republic thread)

Houston Chronicle Washington Bureau

May 14, 2008

WASHINGTON — As many as 200 U.S.-trained Mexican security personnel have defected to drug cartels to carry out killings on both sides of the border and as far north as Dallas, Rep. Ted Poe, R-Humble, told Congress on Wednesday.

-snip-

The renegade members of Mexico's elite counter-narcotics teams trained at Fort Benning, Ga., have switched sides, contributing to a wave of violence that has claimed some 6,000 victims over the past 30 months, including prominent law enforcement leaders, the Houston-area Republican told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.

9 posted on 03/09/2009 10:27:07 AM PDT by Ken H
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To: Sender

I suspect that we already have all of that information.

The only fear should be on the part of the cartels. If Texans get involved, it will be the end of the world for them.


10 posted on 03/09/2009 10:29:20 AM PDT by texmexis best (uency)
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To: Ken H

“WASHINGTON — As many as 200 U.S.-trained Mexican security personnel have defected to drug cartels to carry out killings on both sides of the border and as far north as Dallas, Rep. Ted Poe, R-Humble, told Congress on Wednesday.

-snip-

The renegade members of Mexico’s elite counter-narcotics teams trained at Fort Benning, Ga., have switched sides, contributing to a wave of violence that has claimed some 6,000 victims over the past 30 months, including prominent law enforcement leaders, the Houston-area Republican told the House Foreign Affairs Committee. “

________________

Yes.

One of the awol Mexican military guys was caught growing dope about 10 miles from me. The camp was well armed.


11 posted on 03/09/2009 10:32:09 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: nbhunt

“I say turn just a few Marines loose down there and let them take care of business, and that means playing dirty,”

Now, now, you’re being logical again. Instead this is what we’re doing:

From Grassfire.org today:

yet another massive spending bill — the
$410 billion omnibus appropriations bill that contains more than
2,900 pages.

Worse yet, the bill is laden with 8,500 pork-filled earmarks—
including $473,000 for National Council of La Raza!

As you know, La Raza (which means “The Race”) is a far-left Latino group
that has brazenly promoted amnesty and even supported radical Mexican
nationalism within our borders.

In addition, the spending bill includes…

—$1.8 million for pig odor and manure management

—$200,000 for a “tattoo-removal violence-outreach
program” in Los Angeles

TATOO removal??????? Can’t have those MS-13 gangbangers going around with tatoos that can identify them!!!!


12 posted on 03/09/2009 10:37:11 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Sender; All

Mexican cartels plague Atlanta

http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2009-03-08-mex-cartels_N.htm

Good article, can’t be posted, link only.


13 posted on 03/09/2009 10:40:11 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: texmexis best
If Texans get involved

The drug lords will be forced to eat nothing but New York chili with beans while listening to Captain & Tenille until they crack.

14 posted on 03/09/2009 10:52:00 AM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: prismsinc

“What’s this? Now the Mexican Government wants us to provide them with police forces as well?”

No, they don’t want us operating over there. I wish they would let our guys come in to try to take out some of the leadership of these cartels.


15 posted on 03/09/2009 10:53:15 AM PDT by SmallGovRepub
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To: texmexis best
In Mexico's drug wars, fears of a U.S. front

Well, let me put aside those fears. The front has already been opened.
16 posted on 03/09/2009 10:55:23 AM PDT by attiladhun2 (Obama is the anti-Reagan, he believes government is the solution, rather than the problem)
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To: nbhunt

When our own government arrests our own border guards and gives money to the cartel....


17 posted on 03/09/2009 10:57:38 AM PDT by Dallas59 ("You know the one with the big ears? He might be yours, but he ain't my president.")
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To: AuntB

Atlanta has the best network of buses and other transportation directly from and to the Mexican border portals, and from here on to many major markets, so I am not surprised. Little Gainesville GA, close to me, has had several gang shootings, all Hispanic gangs. You can’t make a decent living plucking chickens, so there is always the drug trade. Personally, along with making employment of illegals impossible, I would decriminalize marijuana. That would make the whole criminal enterprise moot. Adios, muchachos.


18 posted on 03/09/2009 10:59:11 AM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: attiladhun2

Yes it has.


19 posted on 03/09/2009 11:12:38 AM PDT by texmexis best (uency)
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To: Sender

“Personally, along with making employment of illegals impossible, I would decriminalize marijuana. That would make the whole criminal enterprise moot. Adios, muchachos.”

That one is a crap shoot at best, isn’t it. I’m inclined to believe the only way we will get thousands of acres of our park and forest land out of the armed Mexican Drug cartel cultivation, is to make it legal.


20 posted on 03/09/2009 11:13:14 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Sender
“Personally, along with making employment of illegals impossible, I would decriminalize marijuana.”

I bet you mean “legalize” instead of “decriminalize.” People often use those words interchangeably, but they don't mean the same thing. Massachusetts just decriminalized marijuana. I think if you are caught with an ounce or less up there they'll take it from you and give you something like a $100 fine now, just a ticket and it doesn't go on your record. Decriminalization usually means to remove the threat of jail time and in most cases it also means you won't get a criminal record if you are caught. Several states have decriminalized marijuana. If you are talking about a system where it is legal to grow it and sell it and possess it then you are talking about legalization, even if you anticipate that production and sales would be well regulated. Legalization with large scale commercial production of marijuana and sales through licensed retail shops is what would really hurt Mexican cartels.

21 posted on 03/09/2009 11:41:21 AM PDT by TKDietz
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To: AuntB
If guns are coming into Mexico from the US it’s under the guidance of those in charge in Mexico and they darn well know it!

You hit the nail on the head, AuntB!

22 posted on 03/09/2009 11:45:57 AM PDT by Sarajevo (You jealous because the voices only talk to me.)
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To: Sarajevo


If guns are coming into Mexico from the US it’s under the guidance of those in charge in Mexico and they darn well know it!”

We must remember this. The libs in congress will push to damage the 2nd amendment by pushing the idea the problems in Mexico are because of OUR guns. Don’t let them!


23 posted on 03/09/2009 11:49:26 AM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: TKDietz
As a start, I would make the home cultivation of a small number of plants for personal use legal. The usual rules for DUI and other common sense still apply. Then, who would drive around in shady neighborhoods to pay big bucks to shady characters for unknown, illegal wares?

Ultimately I would make it a licensed commodity like alcohol. Then the government would be happy because they would make billions in taxes from it. And there would be no pot buyers for the Mexican cartels.

There is still meth and heroin and cocaine, but I would not want to see those legalized, even though that would be the end of the cartels. They are just too harmful.

24 posted on 03/09/2009 11:55:05 AM PDT by Sender (It's never too late to be who you could have been.)
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To: Sender; TKDietz
Ultimately I would make it a licensed commodity like alcohol. Then the government would be happy because they would make billions in taxes from it. And there would be no pot buyers for the Mexican cartels.

Yes, that alone would cut off most of their revenues. Marjuana is the big ticket item for the Mexican cartels:

John P. Walters, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, said marijuana, not heroin or cocaine, is the "bread and butter," "the center of gravity" for Mexican drug cartels that every year smuggle tons of it through the porous U.S.-Mexico border. Of the $13.8 billion that Americans contributed to Mexican drug traffickers in 2004-05, about 62 percent, or $8.6 billion, comes from marijuana consumption.

http://www.dallasnews.com/sharedcontent/dws/dn/latestnews/stories/022208dnintdrugs.3a98bb0.html

25 posted on 03/09/2009 12:07:33 PM PDT by Ken H
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To: AuntB; 1_Inch_Group; 2sheep; 2Trievers; 3AngelaD; 3pools; 3rdcanyon; 4Freedom; 4ourprogeny; ...

Ping!


26 posted on 03/09/2009 12:17:17 PM PDT by HiJinx (~ Support Our Troops ~ www.AmericaSupportsYou.mil ~)
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To: Sarajevo; Travis McGee; Jeff Head; blackie; Issaquahking; bang_list

I just got an email from our retired border agent friends. You and I were discussing guns, Mexico earlier and the thought the libs would use our 2nd amendment against us. Well, it’s already started.

Douglas Cohn & Eleanor Clift: Mexican drugs and U.S. guns
March 09, 2009 6:00 AM
http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20090309/NEWS04/903090314

Just one line:
“American arms dealers line the U.S. side of the border, supplying the criminal elements with weapons while the Mexican government, unable to fully employ its population, tries only half-heartedly to shut down its most lucrative export, drugs. The result is a closed loop that would be comical if it weren’t so tragic. The guns flow from El Paso, Texas to Juarez, Mexico, and the drugs flow from Juarez to El Paso. The arms dealers and their defenders fall back on Second Amendment rights to justify making weapons plentiful even as the product that is fought over and defended and distributed is banned in the United States.”
____________

Arms dealers line the border!!! Haven’t ya seen ‘em down there passing out guns to the illegal aliens!!

Eleanor, you miserable old ____!


27 posted on 03/09/2009 2:53:41 PM PDT by AuntB (The right to vote in America: Blacks 1870; Women 1920; Native Americans 1925; Foreigners 2008)
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To: Sender
“Ultimately I would make it a licensed commodity like alcohol. Then the government would be happy because they would make billions in taxes from it. And there would be no pot buyers for the Mexican cartels.

There is still meth and heroin and cocaine, but I would not want to see those legalized, even though that would be the end of the cartels. They are just too harmful.”

I agree. Some people think we should legalize those other drugs as well, but they are too harmful both to the people who use them, which doesn't concern me much, and more importantly to innocent people and society as a whole. They are so addictive, and people addicted to these drugs us cause a lot of problems. Very few actually use them now, so a relatively small number of new users (a few million) could put us in the position where we would soon have several times as many hard drug addicts to deal with. That wouldn't be good at all. With the exception of older folks sixty and older, most American adults have already tried marijuana. We couldn't see the number who try it even double, and I doubt it would come anywhere close to that because there are a lot of good reasons for not smoking pot that will still exist even if it was legal. We probably wouldn't have that big of an increase in the number of pot smokers, and pot smokers really aren't that big of a problem for us to begin with. If there is a big fad and the number of pot smokers jumps considerably, it wouldn't really be that big of a deal because when the fad wanes most people would just quit. It's not that addictive. If you have a heroin use fad or a meth fad with an explosion of new users not so many would quit when the fad waned because that stuff is so addictive and a lot of these people wouldn't be able to quit. I think it would be a good idea to legalize pot because we are causing more harm than good trying to keep up the ban. It would be a big mistake to legalize those other drugs though.

28 posted on 03/09/2009 4:56:22 PM PDT by TKDietz
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To: AuntB
The gun issue, supposedly being pushed by the Mexican Government is a pack of lies. According to what I read most of the guns used by the cartels, in this war are capable of full automatic fire, those are not coming from the U.S. in any numbers.

I seem to remember during the Clinton Administration, a shipping container of Chineese full auto Ak47s with a destination of Mexico, being apprehended at a port in the Pacific Northwest. It was stated at the time, it was one of three containers of weapons bound for Mexico, the other two made it through from what I read.

29 posted on 03/09/2009 5:45:37 PM PDT by c-b 1 (Reporting from behind enemy lines, in occupied AZTLAN.)
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To: AuntB

Gee, if we just got rid of our arms dealers, the problem would solve itself.


30 posted on 03/09/2009 6:39:19 PM PDT by Travis McGee (www.EnemiesForeignAndDomestic.com)
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To: AuntB

Wake Up America!


31 posted on 03/10/2009 7:53:26 AM PDT by blackie (Be Well~Be Armed~Be Safe~Molon Labe!)
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