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Suburbia R.I.P. (the central planner's dream)
finance.yahoo ^ | March 12, 2009 | Michael Cannell

Posted on 03/14/2009 7:56:54 AM PDT by dennisw

The downturn accomplished what a generation of designers and planners could not: it has turned back the tide of suburban sprawl. In the wake of the foreclosure crisis many new subdivisions are left half built and more established suburbs face abandonment. Cul-de-sac neighborhoods once filled with the sound of backyard barbecues and playing children are falling silent. Communities like Elk Grove, Calif., and Windy Ridge, N.C., are slowly turning into ghost towns with overgrown lawns, vacant strip malls and squatters camping in empty homes. In Cleveland alone, one of every 13 houses is now vacant, according to an article published Sunday in The New York Times magazine.

Thirty-five percent of the nation's wealth has been invested in building a drivable suburban landscape, according to Christopher Leinberger, an urban planning professor at the University of Michigan and visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution. James Howard Kunstler, author of "The Geography of Nowhere," has been saying for years that we can no longer afford suburbs. "If Americans think they've been grifted by Goldman Sachs and Bernie Madoff, wait until they find out what a swindle the so-called 'American Dream' of suburban life turns out to be," he wrote on his blog

So what's to become of those leafy subdivisions with their Palladian detailing and tasteful signage? Already low or middle-income families priced out of cities and better neighborhoods are moving into McMansions divided for multi-family use. Alison Arieff, who blogs for The New York Times, visited one such tract mansion that was split into four units, or "quartets," each with its own entrance, which is not unlike what happened to many stately homes in the 1930s.

Richard Florida, argues that dense and diverse cities with "accelerated rates of urban metabolism" are the communities most likely to innovate their way through economic crisis.

(Excerpt) Read more at finance.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: realestate; suburbia; suburbs

1 posted on 03/14/2009 7:56:54 AM PDT by dennisw
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To: dennisw
We live in the city within walking distance of stores & restaurants, if you don't mind dodging the vagrants, wild dogs, broken glass bottles and crazy drivers...

It's not as cool as some people think.

2 posted on 03/14/2009 8:04:34 AM PDT by LongElegantLegs (Embrace what is wrong.)
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To: dennisw

I say we sell em to the mexican immigrants and move to warmer weather in Mexico. Then build a wall only allowing cute senioritas thru.


3 posted on 03/14/2009 8:04:59 AM PDT by junta (Not even respectable mainstream conservatives can save liberalism.)
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To: dennisw
In Cleveland alone, one of every 13 houses is now vacant, according to an article published Sunday in The New York Times magazine

Which relates to the subject of dying suburbs how? Cleveland's outer suburbs are doing just fine, and growing.

This sounds like a heavy dose of hopey-changey wishful thinking on the part of a loopy-lefty writer.

4 posted on 03/14/2009 8:06:08 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: hinckley buzzard

Which relates to the subject of dying suburbs how? Cleveland’s outer suburbs are doing just fine, and growing.

This is just prep work for when our benevolent govt forces us back into the cities


5 posted on 03/14/2009 8:09:29 AM PDT by Nailbiter
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To: LongElegantLegs

We live in the city as well and deal with such things as well (minus the wild dogs). It sure is nice to have a grocery store 2 blocks away and work a whopping 20 blocks away though. I don’t know the size of your city but Portland is only a medium sized city so it is sort of cozy.


6 posted on 03/14/2009 8:10:10 AM PDT by 31R1O ("Science is organized knowledge. Wisdom is organized life."- Immanuel Kant)
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To: Nailbiter

I was gonna say, WTF does Cleveland have to do with this? Also, other “master planned” communities such as Irvine, CA, etc., are doing quite well despite housing prices tanking. Hell, I live 90 miles north of Boston and they can’t build houses up here fast enough for the libtards to commute down there, poor bastards.


7 posted on 03/14/2009 8:12:06 AM PDT by OCCASparky (Steely-Eyed Killer of the Deep)
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To: Nailbiter
Which relates to the subject of dying suburbs how? Cleveland’s outer suburbs are doing just fine, and growing.

And believe me, Elk Grove California is not a ghost town. This article is pure liberal B.S.

8 posted on 03/14/2009 8:13:31 AM PDT by ExtremeUnction
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To: dennisw
Richard Florida, a Toronto business professor and author of "Who's Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life," argues that dense and diverse cities with "accelerated rates of urban metabolism" are the communities most likely to innovate their way through economic crisis

I hope this moron is in one when the food deliveries stop, and the drugs run out.

Every few months these "Predictions" appear.

In deference to the family friendly nature of FR, I will use extreme self-censorship, and not begin to scratch the surface of my true contmept for this position except to say that I would live naked in the woods like a beast, before I would move to a Democrat-infested, filthy crime-ridden, crumbling corrupt open sewer of a rat warren terrorist-magnet.

9 posted on 03/14/2009 8:13:56 AM PDT by Gorzaloon (Roark, Architect.)
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To: LongElegantLegs

The liberal has hated the suburbs forever. They vote Republican and have high standards.


10 posted on 03/14/2009 8:14:06 AM PDT by KC_Conspirator
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To: Nailbiter

Yep...just another a trial balloon from the MSM / DBM socialistmarxistcommunist faithful.


11 posted on 03/14/2009 8:14:37 AM PDT by Osage Orange (Our constitution protects aliens, drunks and U.S. Senators. -Will Rogers)
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To: dennisw
For quite a long time, the Left has been trying to achieve the following:

1) Equalize incomes, close the "gap" between rich and poor.
2) Drastically reduce carbon emissions, even if it means crippling the economies of the West,
3) End suburban sprawl, centralize human populations and let nature take back the outlying areas.

By setting in motion an economic crisis and by making "good use" of that crisis, these goals may all be achieved. I think it was all deliberate.

12 posted on 03/14/2009 8:15:16 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy (American Revolution II -- overdue)
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To: dennisw
I would gladly live in a half finished development and fight vandals daily than to live in the democrat socialist hell holes of Philadelphia or Detroit or...
13 posted on 03/14/2009 8:15:58 AM PDT by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: dennisw

You can find crime, slums, empty homes, empty schools, and empty Wal-Marts in every urban city...yet somehow a few foreclosed homes in the suburbs marks the death of suburbia?!

Oh please...


14 posted on 03/14/2009 8:16:58 AM PDT by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: Gorzaloon
"Richard Florida, a Toronto business professor and author of "Who's Your City?: How the Creative Economy Is Making Where to Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life," argues that dense and diverse cities with "accelerated rates of urban metabolism" are the communities most likely to innovate their way through economic crisis..."

So diverse Detroit is innovating. Who knew?!

15 posted on 03/14/2009 8:19:34 AM PDT by Southack (Media Bias means that Castro won't be punished for Cuban war crimes against Black Angolans in Africa)
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To: hinckley buzzard
"In Cleveland alone, one of every 13 houses is now vacant," Which relates to the subject of dying suburbs how?

There goes the articles credibility. I was going to ask the same question.

This sounds like a heavy dose of hopey-changey wishful thinking on the part of a loopy-lefty writer.

Yup.

16 posted on 03/14/2009 8:21:45 AM PDT by FreeReign
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To: ClearCase_guy

It’s a Democratic Party interest group perfect storm. In this (forced urbanization), the interests of the unions, the environmentalists, and the racebaiters—who otherwise have wildly diverging and conflicting priorities—converge.


17 posted on 03/14/2009 8:23:54 AM PDT by denydenydeny ("I'm sure this goes against everything youÂ’ve been taught, but right and wrong do exist"-Dr House)
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To: hinckley buzzard
Which relates to the subject of dying suburbs how? Cleveland's outer suburbs are doing just fine, and growing.

Right. I guess they just wanted to throw a little more doom in there, even though it was irrelevant.

18 posted on 03/14/2009 8:24:08 AM PDT by Right Wing Assault
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To: dennisw

There is nothing wrong with a suburb, it’s just the illogical way they are designed where nothing connects to anything, and it’s impossible to do anything without a car.


19 posted on 03/14/2009 8:24:24 AM PDT by VanDeKoik (Conservatives see untapped potential. Liberals see Tapped-out hopelessness.)
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To: Southack
So diverse Detroit is innovating. Who knew?!

Cities don't innovate. They are just run by the children and grandchildren of the thugs who always ran them. How can they innovate unless they are cleaned up at the top? And that cannot happen because the parasites are embedded like ticks, and have built political machines.

If a city were a dog, it would be easy...worm medicine.

20 posted on 03/14/2009 8:30:22 AM PDT by Gorzaloon (Roark, Architect.)
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To: ClearCase_guy
For quite a long time, the Left has been trying to achieve the following:

1) Equalize incomes, close the "gap" between rich and poor.
2) Drastically reduce carbon emissions, even if it means crippling the economies of the West,
3) End suburban sprawl, centralize human populations and let nature take back the outlying areas.

By setting in motion an economic crisis and by making "good use" of that crisis, these goals may all be achieved. I think it was all deliberate.

In the UK there is a war against the rural areas, one example being the Jiahd against fox hunting. A rough equivalent to the socialist war against our suburbs and independent travel in your automobile. You should be herded onto mass transit to save the planet

In California you have them bankrupting farmers via water deprivation in favor of salmon. And the EPA coming up with punitive dust rules on farmer's backs

21 posted on 03/14/2009 8:33:27 AM PDT by dennisw (0bomo the subprime president)
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To: Gorzaloon

Richard Florida is an Grade-A huckster.

That whole “creative class” BS was nothing more than a bunch of kids who were so high on their ability to use Photoshop, make glorified YouTube videos, and string together a lot of BS to make it sound important, that they thought they were God’s gift to wherever they moved. No practical skills in their whole group, unless sipping coffee and playing on Facebook is a skill.

Believe me, I know lots of these brats, and they still dont know whats heading their way. They are still in Obama party mode.


22 posted on 03/14/2009 8:34:02 AM PDT by VanDeKoik (Conservatives see untapped potential. Liberals see Tapped-out hopelessness.)
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To: Gorzaloon
How can they innovate unless they are cleaned up at the top? And that cannot happen because the parasites are embedded like ticks, and have built political machines. If a city were a dog, it would be easy...wormmedicine.

A dog that sick would be put down.

23 posted on 03/14/2009 8:38:32 AM PDT by cayuga (Not all morons voted for 0bama, but all 0bama voters are morons.)
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To: VanDeKoik
There is nothing wrong with a suburb, it’s just the illogical way they are designed where nothing connects to anything, and it’s impossible to do anything without a car.

But that is one of the reasons for living in them. OK, I am not objective because I grew up in the country, tried to live in a city, and was miserable in one. But people who do not want to huddle enjoy living a decentralized life.

When the nearby city extended mass transit to one of its suburbs, the very first day the station opend, six cars were stolen from my sister's apartment building's lot. This is why people do not want anything to do with cities once they have adapted to suburbia or exurbia. The cities are filled with not-very-nice people. Bad people run them.

Bad people often run the suburbs also (Scum floats), but they are much easier to uncover and flush. The political machines are smaller and clumsier at hiding what they do.

24 posted on 03/14/2009 8:41:09 AM PDT by Gorzaloon (Roark, Architect.)
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To: dennisw
This Liberal Moonbat envisions large multiple layered Utopian dwellings in his perfect world of man made heaven on Earth, where everyone is happy, free, have no moral restrictions, have plenty to eat and endless health, living a pure uninhibited lifestyle.

Oh, and don't forget the perfect environment of blue skies, no disasters and pure untreated water.

25 posted on 03/14/2009 8:42:10 AM PDT by PSYCHO-FREEP (WHAT? Where did my tag line go? (ACORN))
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To: All
The downturn accomplished what a generation of designers and planners could not: it has turned back the tide of suburban sprawl.

Yah. And according to the WSJ this week there are a number of new high-rise construction projects in Seattle that just went idle. Talk about eyesores...

26 posted on 03/14/2009 8:44:47 AM PDT by sionnsar (Iran Azadi | 5yst3m 0wn3d - it's N0t Y0ur5 (SONY) | "Tax the rich" fails if the rich won't play)
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To: VanDeKoik
There is nothing wrong with a suburb, it’s just the illogical way they are designed where nothing connects to anything, and it’s impossible to do anything without a car.

That's only half the story.
Liberals would hate suburb's anyway because they are a refuge from awful schools and loony diversity and the people tend to have high income and have green lawns
The leftist dream is to make suburban schools as bad as urban schools

27 posted on 03/14/2009 8:47:21 AM PDT by dennisw (0bomo the subprime president)
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To: sionnsar

To call it what the author really means; Take everyone, concentrate them in central dwellings, control every aspect of their lives for the “greater good”. It falls under the definition of Communism. No other way to put it.


28 posted on 03/14/2009 8:48:52 AM PDT by PSYCHO-FREEP (WHAT? Where did my tag line go? (ACORN))
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To: Right Wing Assault
Right. I guess they just wanted to throw a little more doom in there, even though it was irrelevant.

I don't think it's irrelevant. Instead, it actually contradicts the point of the article. It suggests "City RIP" (or at the very least the housing market is over built).

29 posted on 03/14/2009 8:51:51 AM PDT by FreeReign
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To: dennisw

A hearty thank-you to all of you who have reported in from the Burbs to refute this article.

Burbs are much better than cities but they are also inefficient. Our move to them over the last few decades since WWII has been haphazard. It would have been so nice and logical to have thought ahead enough to make them modular with a hub and spoke system of efficient mass transportation instead of tens of thousands of acres of moving parking lots we have dubbed as freeways.

There is a way to remedy the situation but it will not come from the dumocrats.


30 posted on 03/14/2009 8:54:32 AM PDT by Sequoyah101 (Get the bats and light the hay)
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To: dennisw; All

Satisfaction in the suburbs

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2203817/posts


31 posted on 03/14/2009 8:57:24 AM PDT by Lorianne
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To: 31R1O
We live in downtown San Antonio, which I believe is quite a bit larger. Cozy is not how I would describe it, even though we live right by the tourist-trap areas. It is nice to have things close by, but I still drive everywhere.
32 posted on 03/14/2009 9:00:15 AM PDT by LongElegantLegs (Embrace what is wrong.)
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To: Sequoyah101

The key to the suburbs (assuming you don’t have a job *in* the suburb) is living at the “end of the line” of a mass transit system.

I live in a very outer suburb of SF and I love my BART commute to SF; I get a nice quiet hour to read. I’m thinking of moving to Northern Virginia and buying in a suburb there (better schools, for one thing), and again, buying near the very last Metro stop.

There’s no reason to do tons of driving just because you are in a suburb. And I don’t drive to shop; I use safeway.com and get all my groceries delivered to me.


33 posted on 03/14/2009 9:01:58 AM PDT by olivia3boys
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To: Gorzaloon

“But people who do not want to huddle enjoy living a decentralized life.”

+1


34 posted on 03/14/2009 9:19:33 AM PDT by Rammer
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To: hinckley buzzard

Yes, this is a pile of doggie doo, for sure!


35 posted on 03/14/2009 9:25:13 AM PDT by Rockiette (Democrats are not intelligent)
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To: Southack

Oh, so he is from Toronto! I hope he was on the 51st floor in a 338 square foot condo when we had the massive Great Northeast Blackout a few years ago. No water (the pumps quit when the power goes off), no elevators, no air conditioning and no lights.

I hope he was in the same place on the coldest day in 2009 when we had a massive blackout due to a sprinkler pipe bursting and flooding one of the downtown hydro stations. Or in the building where the hydro exploded and everyone was put out of their homes for a couple of months and had to live in shelters or schools or wherever they could until the city got around to repairing the building (and when they came back, they found that teenagers from the community — later caught — had been in the *secure* building and looted it.

Yep, living jammed together in 60 story buildings with no view but other buildings, in a city where both power and water are problematical especially in winter is waaaaaay better than living on your own land with a yard and a view of the lake!

Feh.


36 posted on 03/14/2009 10:45:22 AM PDT by Appleby
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