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Let Them Eat Arugula: Trendy food snobbery has soup kitchens going off course
The National Review ^ | May 15, 2009 | Julie Gunlock

Posted on 05/15/2009 2:43:27 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet

The $787-billion economic-stimulus plan signed by Pres. Barack Obama contained an often-overlooked section — $150 million for food banks and other organizations that provide food to people in need. Responding to reports that food banks were running out of provisions because of rising unemployment and higher food costs, Congress intervened to help stock the shelves. But taxpayers — the people paying for Congress’s charitable endeavors — should know that not all of these organizations are suffering. Some are even able to throw food away.

Last month, Michelle Obama visited Miriam’s Kitchen, which serves the homeless in Washington, D.C. She ladled out mushroom risotto to the men and women waiting in line, had her picture taken, and talked about the importance of volunteering to meet the growing needs of families around the country. The trip to Miriam’s Kitchen was received as a very good thing — a very first-ladylike thing to do.

But the first lady’s visit wasn’t just about the needs of the homeless; it was also very much about the food itself. In a Washington Post article covering the visit, one Miriam’s Kitchen official explained, “If anyone brings us donuts, Steve [the chef] throws them away. . . . It is not good food for our guests. We care too much to give them anything but the best. Steve wants our guests to have the same experience as if they were paying $30 for the meal.”

There are a lot of things that are not good for the guests of Miriam’s Kitchen — beginning with being homeless, a situation often caused by drug addiction and mental illness. And while eating a donut would seem to be the least of these people’s troubles, it is certainly a worthy goal for food kitchens to endeavor to provide a healthy meal to those they serve. All the same, that dismissal of donuts betrays an expanding food snobbery that once was confined to food magazines and ladies who lunch, but now is showing up in the unlikeliest of places, like food banks and homeless shelters.

This attitude is not limited to the shelters in our nation’s capital. A recent meal served at the Meet Each Need with Dignity (MEND) kitchen in Pacoima, Calif., included pumpkin soup seasoned with browned butter and sage, red-wine barbecue beef on handmade puff pastry, artichoke hearts with meatballs marinara, roasted-garlic-and-turnip mashed potatoes, all topped off with fresh blueberries and sour cream. No wonder these places need a bailout.

What is most worrisome is the counterproductive message Miriam’s Kitchen is sending to those who donate food: it might get thrown away. No one objects to feeding homeless people healthy and tasty food, and no one wants to return to the Dickensian days of giving the poor gruel laced with bugs. But it is shocking to hear that charities are throwing away perfectly good food at a time when stimulus funds — that is, American taxpayers’ dollars — are being used to supplement their food stores.

Millions of Americans are out of jobs, and some are inevitably relying on the occasional trip to the food bank. Should they be advised to stay away from food banks because they give out Velveeta, hot dogs, white bread, and (gasp!) canned vegetables — food that doesn’t meet some gourmet ideal? Is government supposed to step in to make sure not only that every family has enough to eat, but that what they’re eating is pumpkin soup and mushroom risotto?

The economy is changing the way people shop and eat. Consumers are cutting back on food costs, cooking at home rather than heading out to restaurants, and buying generics over more expensive name-brand products. Sales of pasta are up, presumably because it is cheap and versatile. McDonald’s is thriving in this economy — the dollar menu has become a real draw. New stars are even cropping up, including 93-year-old YouTube sensation Clara Cannucciari, who reminisces about coming of age during the 1930s and demonstrates some of her mother’s Depression-era recipes. Even those glossy food magazines are getting in on the cheap-eats movement, featuring stories on pot pies rather than foie gras. (Isn’t it adorable that the editors of these magazines think “cutting back” means cutting out foie gras and truffles?)

Food banks play an important role in helping those in need. Not only do they provide nourishment, but many also run wonderful programs with a focus on food. One project run out of Washington’s Central Kitchen teaches homeless and unemployed adults how to cook so that they might find work in one of the capital’s restaurants.

The staff of Miriam’s Kitchen should be praised for the work that they do every day to help Washington’s homeless, but they should be careful not to forget their mission: to serve the homeless a good meal. I suspect what warms the hearts of the people waiting in line is less the quality of the risotto and more the promise of a decent meal served by friendly people who want to help them get back on their feet. Turning Miriam’s Kitchen into a place to get a $30 meal for free misses the mark.

************

—Julie Gunlock, a former congressional staffer, is now a stay-at-home mom.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government
KEYWORDS: 111th; congress; homeless; michelleobama; obama; porkulus; poverty; soupkitchens; stimulus; tsa
Unreal! I guess John Edwards was right about "Two Americas" and all that. Who knew that there were "trendy homeless" that eat gourmet meals? Makes me think I'm a fool for working and building a business...
1 posted on 05/15/2009 2:43:27 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Wow...they used to say “beggars can’t be choosers” but I guess now the homeless select haute cuisine.

This is so much like the liberal obsession with good intentions. Hungry people don’t care what they get as long as it is satisfying. But I’m sure liberals love to boast about their organic, gourmet charity work. Sounds like FLOTUS’ expensive sneakers fit right in.


2 posted on 05/15/2009 2:51:53 PM PDT by Crolis (Kill your television!)
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To: All

“If anyone brings us donuts, Steve [the chef] throws them away. . . . It is not good food for our guests. We care too much to give them anything but the best. Steve wants our guests to have the same experience as if they were paying $30 for the meal.”

On one hand, I applaud this food bank for thinking enough of the people they serve by trying to avoid serving any old slop. That’s commendable.

On the other hand, the above comments reek of snootiness and elitism. I am aware of several soup kitchens in my area that don’t have a “chef” on premises. Nor do they serve mushroom risotto and pumpkin soup.


3 posted on 05/15/2009 2:58:35 PM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
93-year-old YouTube sensation Clara Cannucciari

I just looked that up. She is great! I'm going to try some of her dishes.

4 posted on 05/15/2009 3:02:27 PM PDT by antiRepublicrat
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To: Crolis

Jeez, and to think I have been forgoing restaurants because I couldn’t afford to eat out. Now I know where to go when my next anniversary rolls around!


5 posted on 05/15/2009 3:02:56 PM PDT by wombtotomb (ITS NOT ABOUT RIGHT VS. LEFT, ITS ABOUT RIGHT VS. WRONG!)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
I haven't exactly seen gourmet foods at the food banks I support. It's very basic, very filling stuff. This would be a tough call, because donuts really aren't very good for you, no protein, lots of fat and sugar. If someone’s getting their day's main meal at a shelter those empty calories are a bad choice.
6 posted on 05/15/2009 3:04:00 PM PDT by colorado tanker ("Lastly, I'd like to apologize for America's disproportionate response to Pearl Harbor . . . ")
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
all topped off with fresh blueberries and sour cream.

What not creme fraiche? They got no coots. Er, I mean, how uncouth.

7 posted on 05/15/2009 3:05:18 PM PDT by sockmonkey
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

8 posted on 05/15/2009 3:05:44 PM PDT by Westlander (Unleash the Neutron Bomb)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Steve wants our guests to have the same experience as if they were paying $30 for the meal.”

To go away hungry because the plates were big but the servings were small?

Assuming that the ingredients were proportionately more expensive than you would use in a $3 shelter meal, that means the "chef" would rather feed one needy person trendily than feed ten of them well.

9 posted on 05/15/2009 3:05:52 PM PDT by KarlInOhio (No free man bows to a foreign king.)
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To: Crolis

Risotto is very basic and very cheap. You can add spinach or peas instead of mushrooms to keep the price down or for variety. You need some oil, some broth and an onion besides the rice and you can add anything you have around, if you want. It takes time and you can ruin it if you aren’t careful, but it is not expensive in terms of ingredients. I was taught a Northern Italian version with leftover chicken and lots of basil and it will feed a small army and feed them well for little money.

Pumpkin soup is also very basic and pumpkin is cheap, especially fresh, in season. Again, all you need is some oil and an onion, some seasoning and some broth. Some cream is nice, but non-essential. A food processor helps, but you could do it in batches in a blender or even whip the cooked vegetable with a hand mixer. You could use squash, instead. Butternut squash makes a wonderful soup.

These are popular recipes, but they are simple and inexpensive. They take a bit more time than steamed rice or a steamed vegetable. I do not understand why they are considered elitist.


10 posted on 05/15/2009 3:52:52 PM PDT by reformedliberal (Are we at high crimes or misdemeanors, yet?)
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To: colorado tanker

So?
Donuts are portable. They could put them at the door to take with them.

No my FRiend, this is an agenda.

I worked the St. Augustine’s Food Bank in Cleveland. We handed EVERYTHING out. If it was donated, it went. As long as it wasn’t moldy, we either cooked it as an ingredient or gave it away for later.

If these people are truly hungry they will appreciate a snack when the shelter is not open or for a friend on the street they can’t get to come in.

The homeless and hungry care about food, not what is healthy for them.


11 posted on 05/15/2009 4:07:00 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Psalm 109:8 - Let his days be few; and let another take his office)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

http://www.miriamskitchen.org/http://www.miriamskitchen.org/

Trendy. I like today’s morning menu: Scrambled eggs with ground beef & onions, stone-ground grits, toast, garden salad, and fruit salad.


12 posted on 05/15/2009 4:12:33 PM PDT by USMCPOP (Father of LCpl. Karl Linn, KIA 1/26/2005 Al Haqlaniyah, Iraq)
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To: netmilsmom
It must vary. I work a kitchen here that is run by a couple of culinary school grads that produces very good meals at an amazingly cheap price. I see them get donations though, that they just can't use for a variety of reasons. Sometimes it's stuff that's too old or they can't verify the provenance. They're very gracious even if they know they can't use something.

I don't know what they'd do with donuts as it doesn't fit their menu at all. Maybe they could figure out a way to grind some into their pizza dough. They do a very healthy and filling pizza from scratch.

13 posted on 05/15/2009 4:58:29 PM PDT by colorado tanker ("Lastly, I'd like to apologize for America's disproportionate response to Pearl Harbor . . . ")
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To: colorado tanker

We made boxes to carry out. Anything that wasn’t used was given to those who came in or shared with different churches for the elderly homebound.

Too old or not being able to verify the food is different from throwing away donuts because they are not “healthy”. This is spin. Or maybe the people really aren’t that hungry. When you’re choosing between picking out of a dumpster or a donut, the donut from the soup kitchen doesn’t have extra protein, if you get my drift.

Trust me. I’ve picked out of dumpsters in my life.


14 posted on 05/15/2009 5:27:14 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Psalm 109:8 - Let his days be few; and let another take his office)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Read Breakfast at Sally’s to get the flavor of the leftist entitled twit homeless person.

I actually do not believe the book it true.


15 posted on 05/15/2009 6:36:51 PM PDT by Chickensoup ("Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.")
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

If the food is unhealthy, I can understand it. But to throw out healthy food because it’s not upscale enough has no justification.


16 posted on 05/15/2009 6:44:06 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued (The McCain/Palin ticket was like a Kangaroo, stronger on the bottom than at the top)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Wonder what kind of food Joan Rivers’s charity that delivers food to the AIDS patients?? I would LOVE to know!


17 posted on 05/15/2009 6:57:53 PM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion....the Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
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To: MplsSteve

Donuts are SLOP??? Oh please!


18 posted on 05/15/2009 7:00:15 PM PDT by Ann Archy (Abortion....the Human Sacrifice to the god of Convenience.)
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To: Larry Lucido

muffin tops


19 posted on 05/15/2009 7:17:33 PM PDT by countess
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To: reformedliberal

Wake up. Do you think an addict, alcoholic or those that are homeless are thinking of the subleties of risotto?

Take a long walk on your deck, look at the sky and give thanks for what you have.


20 posted on 05/15/2009 7:19:52 PM PDT by Hilltop (Control the high ground. Control the battlefield.)
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To: colorado tanker
. If someone’s getting their day's main meal at a shelter those empty calories are a bad choice.

Perhaps, but a sweet treat is also probably most appreciated. At the meal program my kids and I worked at the "guests" were fond of the small sugar packets meant for coffee. They would store them in their pockets for quick energy (and probably to stave off the worst of hunger pangs) when necessary.

21 posted on 05/15/2009 7:36:41 PM PDT by Mygirlsmom
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
I'm shaking my head in disbelief. Turning away food...

During my undergrad and grad school days, I kept a crock pot full of soup. All leftover veggies and meat went into the pot, and our apartment was a familiar stop for other equally impoverished students.

Thank the Lord for the Salvation Army. My daughters and I were allowed to stop there on a daily basis and pick up a dozen eggs and all the breads we wanted (yes, we were that poor). Once a month we could go through the food pantry. Most of what we received was out-of-date or generic, but we never got poisoned. My daughters were always fed, and I eventually graduated.

Today, they look back on those days with some fondness and sometimes request one of my unique food pantry creations. To them, it's comfort food.

22 posted on 05/15/2009 7:42:35 PM PDT by NoPrisoners ("When in the course of human events...")
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To: Ann Archy

No, I don’t think donuts are slop. I like donuts. Probably too much actually.

Having said that, my comment was directed to the fact that I find it admirable that the soup kitchen attempts to serve really good meals.

But I do find their comments about throwing away donuts to be snooty. A soup kitchen shouldn’t throw away any edible food.


23 posted on 05/15/2009 7:49:32 PM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: Crolis

I’ll bet most of the beggars would prefer the donuts. I would. Pumpkin soup?


24 posted on 05/15/2009 7:53:04 PM PDT by Richard Kimball (We're all criminals. They just haven't figured out what some of us have done yet.)
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To: netmilsmom
We sometimes got food from the SA food pantry that my daughters couldn't eat because of severe allergies. It was always re-donated during food drives. This had two immediate effects - we felt good about helping others, and my daughters did not grow up believing we were as poor as we really were.

In our neighborhood, we just had a letter carrier food drive. Guess which families did not donate to the cause? Yup, the one that had Obama campaign signs in their front yard this past fall. Maybe they donated elsewhere, but I kind of doubt it.

25 posted on 05/15/2009 7:57:23 PM PDT by NoPrisoners ("When in the course of human events...")
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

I didn’t read the article. Don’t care. Just want to say I love arugula. I planted some today.


26 posted on 05/15/2009 8:04:39 PM PDT by PjhCPA (I'm oogedy boogedey)
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To: reformedliberal
Butternut squash makes a wonderful soup.

It also makes a great risotto.

The impression, though, is that Steve uses fresh shitake, portobellos, or morels, rather than the common supermarket commerical button mushroom.

27 posted on 05/15/2009 8:07:07 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (We have nothing to fear, except our fearful government itself.)
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To: NoPrisoners

I do the same thing with the Angelfood Ministries food. One month was beans, one cooked carrots. I donated them right back. Worked for me!

And I doubt it about the Obama people too!


28 posted on 05/15/2009 9:06:58 PM PDT by netmilsmom (Psalm 109:8 - Let his days be few; and let another take his office)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Read the entire diatribe and didn’t see arugula anywhere, what is it food or something else like road apples???


29 posted on 05/15/2009 9:20:26 PM PDT by dalereed
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To: dalereed

It’s a green that foodies like. Obama made reference to it during the Iowa campaign, talking about how expensive it is at Whole Foods: There are NO Whole Foods Markets in Iowa, period. I suppose West Des Moines or Iowa City might get one, someday...


30 posted on 05/15/2009 9:45:36 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet ("The unarmed man is not just defenseless - he is also contemptible." Machiavelli)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Apparently a Chicago getto food!!!


31 posted on 05/15/2009 9:48:59 PM PDT by dalereed
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Even those glossy food magazines are getting in on the cheap-eats movement, featuring stories on pot pies rather than foie gras. (Isn’t it adorable that the editors of these magazines think “cutting back” means cutting out foie gras and truffles?)

Whenever the trendy "get into" something which was formerly the provenance of the more ordinary folks, look out.

Blue jeans used to be about $5.00 a pair at the co-op, when 'discovered', they went up to $50.00+ a pair and became 'designer' items. The run of the mill, ordinary pair of work jeans did not go up as much, but the price doubled.

If they 'discovered' stone soup, you wouldn't be able to afford a rock... -

32 posted on 05/16/2009 7:03:04 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: ApplegateRanch

That went right by me.

We have a shitake log and my husband gathers morels and chanterelles, so I don’t even think of them as expensive, just as seasonal. I can barely tell the difference between the Baby Bellos and the white mushrooms, so I rarely buy the portobellos. DH doesn’t care for the big ones, anyway.

Perhaps those shitakes and morels are donated, though? They are abundant in our local Farmer’s Market, right now.

I guess the point, for me, is that if people are willing to go to the trouble to prepare good food and to pick up the cost, even by donation, for some gourmet ingredients, it isn’t that big a deal. Right now, not all the folks needing some help are lazy or in this situation only by their own action.

Being somewhat more fortunate, for the time being, at least, I can understand the impulse to add something positive to what must be a really depressive situation for many. I have added fresh coffee beans and large blocks of quality chocolate to my own food pantry donations, at times, if I had extra.


33 posted on 05/16/2009 9:46:27 AM PDT by reformedliberal (Are we at high crimes or misdemeanors, yet?)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
DC's bums and vagrants eat better than I do, apparently.
34 posted on 05/16/2009 9:50:09 AM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: MplsSteve

I wonder just how long the lines are at the pro-donuts places vs the pumpkin soup, mushroom risotto, and whole-wheat brownies places.

Placing bets??


35 posted on 05/16/2009 12:10:03 PM PDT by bboop (obama, little o, not a Real God)
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To: reformedliberal

I think they are considered elitist because they are ‘supposed’ to be better for you, the elites remind you that they are, AND they taste gross. Like unsalted peanut butter and whole wheat brownies.

I think you are seeing a re-action to people being told (by those who profess to know more) what is good for them, what they should eat, what they should NOT eat, what they should feel GUILTY for eating, what kinds of light bulbs they should use, etc. etc. ad nauseum.

I personally believe that God gave us things like wine, coffee, and chocolate (and probably donuts) to help us get through life down here, because it is NOT Heaven.


36 posted on 05/16/2009 12:15:18 PM PDT by bboop (obama, little o, not a Real God)
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To: netmilsmom
If these people are truly hungry they will appreciate a snack when the shelter is not open...

Agreed. I've heard donuts referred to as "Maine soul food."

There's a reason some things are called comfort food.

37 posted on 05/16/2009 12:27:18 PM PDT by Madame Dufarge
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To: USMCPOP

I wonder if the homeless hit the library computers to check out the menus at the soap kitchens before they go out to eat?


38 posted on 05/16/2009 12:33:26 PM PDT by listenhillary (Rahm Emmanuel slip - A crisis is a terrible thing to waste.)
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To: listenhillary

soap=soup durrrrrr...


39 posted on 05/16/2009 12:37:26 PM PDT by listenhillary (Rahm Emmanuel slip - A crisis is a terrible thing to waste.)
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To: bboop

“...God gave us things like wine, coffee, and chocolate (and probably donuts) to help us get through life down here, because it is NOT Heaven.”


I _love_ this!

Amen!!!!!!!


40 posted on 05/16/2009 4:17:16 PM PDT by reformedliberal (Are we at high crimes or misdemeanors, yet?)
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