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To: wintertime

Congrats on having not only gifted kids, but obviously hardworking ones!

I skipped a year of HS myself, and I was also young when I started school, so I was barely 17 when I entered college. I did not find the course work difficult, but I caught a lot of flak for being so young, and also had my opinions ignored a lot when I started grad school. I’m curious whether your kids found it difficult being in school so young? And also, what did they do with their degrees when they finished? Grad school? Did they have difficulty getting jobs afterward, at young ages? I am interested in this not only out of curiousity, but also because I am thinking about homeschooling my kids. Thanks for any info you feel like sharing!


20 posted on 06/15/2009 10:14:43 PM PDT by Hetty_Fauxvert (Psssssst! ... PETRAEUS IN 2012 .... Pass it on!)
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To: Hetty_Fauxvert
I’m curious whether your kids found it difficult being in school so young?

We started with just one course at the community college. Then they took two courses and did fine with that. They decided to gradually take on a full schedule of courses. By the time they were in the university they had full control over their course work. It was like putting a big toe in the water and gradually gaining confidence to do more.

Some have accused my husband and me of pushing our children. But...Honestly, achievement on this level must be self-generated by the child. Also...Success with course encouraged them to take on big course loads until finally they were full-time students.

Socially, there was little interaction in the beginning with the college. I drove to their class, waited for them, and then went home. They were typical homeschoolers doing the usual teenage things ( ballet, jazz, music lessons, church meetings, etc.) Later the children made friends with the tutors in the math lab at the community college, and they enjoyed "hanging out" there. Two became official math tutors at the age of 14 or 15.

On the university level our 2 younger girls continued to live at home. They majored in mathematics. Our church had a center just off the university and they made many friends there. They are accomplished ball-room dancers and made friends with other dancers. Our home often hosted dinner parties and afterward our girls and their university friends ( also members of our church) would go out dancing.

The oldest is a nationally ranked athlete. We moved to another state just before his 16th birthday. He chose to study accounting since it meshed well with his training. His friendships centered around his church friends and those at the athletic center where he trained. As an older teen he worked for our church in Eastern Europe for a few years and while there learned Russian fluently. He continues competing in his sport and this year will finish his MBA ( accounting). He is 25.

And also, what did they do with their degrees when they finished? Grad school?

The oldest is still competing in his sport, and will soon finish his MBA. He coaches part-time as well and manages to support himself doing this. We pay for books and tuition.

The middle child finished a masters degree in math at the age of 20. She was offered work as a professional statistician, but chose instead to be a teacher in a private school. She is married a chemical engineer and they have a 2 year old and are expecting their second child.

The youngest is also married. She earned her B.S. in mathematics at 18. She is a full-time wife and mother.

Did they have difficulty getting jobs afterward, at young ages?

They haven't had to deal with that problem. The oldest has essentially been a full-time athlete and part time business student, as well as taking time to work of our church for a few years. He will finish an MBA at an age typical for accountants to enter the work force.

The middle child finished her M.S. degree at 20 and was offered work in her profession, but by then was married and decided on teaching.

The youngest has never looked for work since she is a wife and mother.

I am interested in this not only out of curiousity, but also because I am thinking about homeschooling my kids. Thanks for any info you feel like sharing!

There are many homeschoolers going to college early. Also, there are many college programs on-line now. Also, now that colleges have had good experiences with homeschoolers they are actually recruiting young homeschoolers .

Your best source for information is your local homeschooling group. Check out the Homeschool Legal Defense Association web site, or ask your local librarian for a group near you. Good luck! It is a wonderful adventure.

21 posted on 06/16/2009 11:59:21 AM PDT by wintertime
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