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To: Myrddin
Hopefully, he has a good idea of where he wants to go in life.
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Isn't this true for high schoolers as well?

Young people who graduate from college early may not go on to make their major their life's work. If they don't, they still have a college level education in that field, and that will become part of the general education that will greatly enrich their life.

My youngest is considering becoming a physician's assistant or a nurse. She earned a B.S. in mathematics at 18. To earn that B.S. degree she needed to take all the general college courses, biology, chemistry, and physics. I consider that a very well rounded liberal education. She is well prepared educationally for whatever she chooses to do in life.

22 posted on 06/16/2009 12:08:00 PM PDT by wintertime
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To: wintertime
It's common to end up in a field that is completely different from your major. I graduated with a degree in Molecular Biology, yet I've worked in computer science and electrical engineering most of my life. The biology degree was intended to support heading to medical school. I decided against doing that. The electrical engineering skills had been built since I was in kindergarten. The computer science skills were added when it became a necessity to be versed in microprocessors around 1980.

A well rounded education still serves you throughout your career. Sometimes it becomes a safety net when your desired trajectory doesn't pan out.

23 posted on 06/16/2009 2:30:44 PM PDT by Myrddin
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