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America's Cult of Celebrity
Townhall.com ^ | July 5, 2009 | Ken Connor

Posted on 07/05/2009 7:11:44 AM PDT by Kaslin

Last week, in the midst of President Obama's efforts to push unprecedented expansions of federal regulatory authority through Congress, North Korea's bellicose threats of nuclear annihilation, and the Iranian regime's brutal campaign to suppress political dissent, the American public's attention was focused elsewhere.

On June 25th, 2009, the nation plunged into mourning upon learning of the tragic deaths of Michael Jackson—inimitable King of Pop—and Hollywood's original "angel" Farah Fawcett. In the time it took for a commercial break, the coverage of the Iranian protests, the debates about cap and trade and healthcare reform, and the diplomatic efforts to recover two American journalists being detained in a North Korean prison all but disappeared. It was eclipsed by footage of distraught fans, video montages, musical tributes, celebrity elegies, and speculation about how the Obama administration might respond.

This lopsided allocation of media attention and public focus is an ominous indicator of how shallow and superficial we've become as a nation, and calls into question whether a nation fixated on entertainment possesses the maturity, discipline, judgment, and civic virtue necessary to preserve freedom in an increasingly hostile world.

While the deaths of two pop-culture icons are certainly newsworthy, the amount of news coverage devoted to America's celebrity obsession is grossly out of proportion in light of the weighty issues confronting our country at this hour. Have we become so shallow, so superficial, SO celebrity-obsessed that Michael Jackson's death is more upsetting, more real to us, than images of democratic protesters bleeding in the streets—that participating in the shameful exploitation of Jon and Kate Gosselin's crumbling marriage on TLC is more important than watching congressional debates about the future of our health care system on C-SPAN?

In the introductory chapter of his book, The Roots of American Order, Russell Kirk discusses the concept of order and how it relates to the success or failure of any society. According to Kirk, "[the civil social] order signifies the performance of certain duties and the enjoyment of certain rights in a community." He suggests that "a disordered existence is a confused and miserable existence. If a society falls into general disorder, many of its members will cease to exist at all. And if the members of a society are disordered in spirit, the outward order of the commonwealth cannot endure."

American society appears to be suffering from a disordered spirit of the kind Kirk describes. One can’t help but wonder if we have lost our capacity for serious engagement with the world around us, and thus our ability to engage with society in a dutiful and conscientious manner. We are increasingly drawn to digital or virtual venues that allow us to escape the humdrum realities of everyday life in exchange for a fantasy world that titillates our senses and tickles our funny bones. In the process, we are losing the ability to distinguish between the important and the inconsequential in our society. Who has time to follow the confirmation process of Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor when the American public is busy keeping up with the Kardashians? Who wants to hear the depressing details of the starvation and poverty plaguing the Third World when we can watch wannabe celebrities starve themselves for money on the latest season of Survivor?

Is it any wonder that only 22% of people polled can name the Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, while 66% can name at least one celebrity judge on American Idol, or that more people can name all five of the Simpson family members than can name the five freedoms protected under the First Amendment?

This misdirection of energy and attention cannot be without negative consequences for the future of American society. Much as Rome's rejection of the fundamental social, spiritual, and cultural components that made her a mighty empire precipitated her downfall, America's preoccupation with "bread and circuses" to the exclusion of more important matters portends a bleak future for our republic.

Who is responsible for this unfortunate phenomenon? Many blame the media for our obsession with entertainment. After all, the media bigwigs—the proverbial wizards behind the curtain—decide what to broadcast and what to leave on the cutting room floor. Are these behemoth corporations, in their quest for ratings, feeding America's baser instincts? Are they exploiting our prurient nature in order to make a quick buck? Even if this is the case, the American people are still left holding the bag of responsibility. We choose what media to consume, which websites to visit, which books to read; we choose how to allocate our time and attention. We are the ones who find reality TV and celebrity culture more entertaining, more fun, less boring, and less hard, than the real world.

But reality TV is not reality, and the truth is that many celebrities' lives are plagued by drug abuse, domestic scandals, and professional failure. From Elvis and Marilyn Monroe, to Anna Nicole and Heath Ledger... the lifestyles of the rich and famous often end in desolation and despair. Yet our society has deified these individuals and glamorized the lives they portray, leading more and more Americans to feel that the only kind of life worth living is a life lived in front of the camera.

The price paid for this delusion is that our society is increasingly losing its ability to celebrate what English writer, philosopher, and Christian apologist G. K. Chesterton called the really human things—those things required for a just society to endure. And as our spirits become more vacant, more disordered, and more obsessed with titillating drivel, we run the risk of suffering the same decline as our forebears in the Roman republic. As Kirk noted, "The late Roman world, then, was a culture spiritually impoverished and disordered, lacking a common core of belief. It has been called a dead world: a time in which the old Roman virtues had been lost by the mass of men.... It was a world spiritually and intellectually bored. Mankind can endure anything but boredom. Because men could not order their own despairing souls, the order of the commonwealth could not be saved."

We Americans must ask ourselves whether we are prepared to suffer the fate of our Roman forebears, or whether we are wise and disciplined enough to learn from their mistakes and make the changes necessary to get this great nation back on the right track.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Editorial
KEYWORDS: celebrity; cult; culturewars; popculture

1 posted on 07/05/2009 7:11:44 AM PDT by Kaslin
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To: Kaslin

The Roman emperors used circuses.


2 posted on 07/05/2009 7:16:55 AM PDT by La Lydia
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To: Kaslin

The reason why we are in the fix we are in is because the public went wild over a new celebrity, and voted him into office.


3 posted on 07/05/2009 7:18:12 AM PDT by Leftism is Mentally Deranged
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To: Kaslin

Potent.

The same things are true in the political arena. America ain’t going to be saved by the “names.” If it will be saved, it will be by a whole bunch of principled and courageous folks no one ever heard of before.

God bless Ken Connor.


4 posted on 07/05/2009 7:19:57 AM PDT by EternalVigilance ("The fiat of the Almighty, "Let there be Light," has not yet spent its force." - Frederick Douglass)
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To: Kaslin

The first step towards saving the republic:

Shut off the television.

Better yet, take a sledge hammer to it.


5 posted on 07/05/2009 7:23:55 AM PDT by EternalVigilance ("The fiat of the Almighty, "Let there be Light," has not yet spent its force." - Frederick Douglass)
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To: Kaslin

” spirits become more vacant, more disordered, and more obsessed with titillating drivel”

Yup.


6 posted on 07/05/2009 7:24:25 AM PDT by bravotu (Have a Nice Day !)
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To: La Lydia
The Roman emperors used circuses.

That's exactly what I was going to say. It's a lust for non-stop entertainment where "freedom" means getting things for nothing.

7 posted on 07/05/2009 7:31:27 AM PDT by arasina (So there.)
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To: Kaslin
We Americans must ask ourselves whether we are prepared to suffer the fate of our Roman forebears, or whether we are wise and disciplined enough to learn from their mistakes and make the changes necessary to get this great nation back on the right track.

The final line of the article is the best. The answer is clearly no. Plan accordingly.

Not to be the bearer of the ugly truth, but the country is exhibiting every symptom of a powerful, late stage democracy. Are there segments of society that are not in terminal decay? Sure.(But many of them are in denial).

On the whole, the body of society is devolving rapidly. No one understand this better than Obama; hence his ability to control the situation. His read on our vulnerability is his key to success. Our inability to really accept what is happening is our key weakness.

Obama's 'change' is to overthrow the old order, which he can see is more illusion than reality these days, in favor of a new, better society. He may not be able to bring it all down, and his new society will fail as hard as any utopia has yet.

His legacy, at the very least, will be as the leader who showed the America people that they had given up on freedom, individualism and faith in themselves as our animating spirit, in exchange for security, safety and obedience to the state.

8 posted on 07/05/2009 7:46:23 AM PDT by Steel Wolf (Oh, well. Back to the drawing board....)
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To: Kaslin

We as Conservatives have lost the American culture. Celebrity worship in America baffles me. Every week at the grocery I see some other people on magazine covers with apparently first names only.


9 posted on 07/05/2009 7:52:02 AM PDT by LimaLimaMikeFoxtrot ("If you don't have my army supplied, and keep it supplied, we'll eat your mules up, sir"-Gen.Sherman)
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To: Kaslin


10 posted on 07/05/2009 8:06:29 AM PDT by Chode (American Hedonist - Obama is basically Jim Jones with a teleprompter)
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To: arasina
It's a lust for non-stop entertainment where "freedom" means getting things for nothing.

Not exactly. The circuses were essentially bribes for political support. In other words, votes.

(To the extent that a vote is your opinion on what the future should be, if voters see selling their vote as "nothing", then they're voting only for today, and to hell with tomorrow. Which explains a lot.)

We often say, "The Romans voted themselves bread and circuses", but in truth, those perks were used by the leaders to buy public opinion. So long as the gravy kept running, the people were happy.

The scarier parallel is that "We support you politically, you get us our free stuff" is *exactly* where we are today. Once this becomes codified as a social contract with the majority of voters, your society is doomed.

11 posted on 07/05/2009 8:12:11 AM PDT by Steel Wolf (Oh, well. Back to the drawing board....)
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To: La Lydia
***The Roman emperors used circuses.***

If I remember my history, when the Gauls broke into the city of ROME the populace was at the coliseum watching gladiators kill each other when they should have been Manning the walls.

12 posted on 07/05/2009 8:32:15 AM PDT by Ruy Dias de Bivar (A modern liberal is someone who doesn't care what you do so long as it is compulsory.)
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To: Kaslin
Lets not forget the sports idol fanatics out there.
13 posted on 07/05/2009 8:41:53 AM PDT by ▀udda▀udd (7 days - 7 ways Guero >>> with a floating, shifting, ever changing persona.....)
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To: Kaslin

“Have we become so shallow, so superficial, SO celebrity-obsessed that Michael Jackson’s death is more upsetting, more real to us, than images of democratic protesters bleeding in the streets—that participating in the shameful exploitation of Jon and Kate Gosselin’s crumbling marriage on TLC is more important than watching congressional debates about the future of our health care system on C-SPAN?”

Well, duh. Lemme expand on that right after America’s Got Talent is over.


14 posted on 07/05/2009 8:47:52 AM PDT by GnuHere
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To: EternalVigilance

Why not just Jam all the broadcasts save for selected news channels? That would more than likely get the point across.


15 posted on 07/05/2009 8:54:34 AM PDT by Mr. C
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To: Mr. C

Nah. We just need to become the real media. Once folks get a taste of the real thing the fake will lose its appeal.


16 posted on 07/05/2009 8:59:44 AM PDT by EternalVigilance ("The fiat of the Almighty, "Let there be Light," has not yet spent its force." - Frederick Douglass)
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To: La Lydia

VIDEO/TV are the “CIRCUSES” of today....


17 posted on 07/05/2009 11:50:01 AM PDT by goodnesswins (For lease)
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To: Kaslin

State run TV also presents a problem, especially when there is a joint investment between the media and the political party that controls the U.S. government.


18 posted on 07/05/2009 12:27:31 PM PDT by Enough is ENOUGH
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To: Kaslin

And people wonder why conservatives abhor popular culture.


19 posted on 07/05/2009 2:45:32 PM PDT by GOP_Raider (Have you risen above your own public education today?)
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To: Kaslin

Turn off the television. We cut our satellite feed a long time ago (2002, maybe?) and only watch a DVD every now and then. The Net, radio and newspapers work fine for news.

Turn the televisions off, and you’ll see from healthier and more realistic perspectives.


20 posted on 07/05/2009 4:00:54 PM PDT by familyop (cbt. engr. (cbt), NG, '89-' 96, Duncan Hunter or no-vote)
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To: Kaslin
This lopsided allocation of media attention and public focus is an ominous indicator of how shallow and superficial we've become as a nation, . . .

I have no argument with the basic premise of this article as referenced by the elevation of Zero to the highest office in the land, but the lopsided allocation of media attention and public focus is more an ominous indicator of how shallow and superficial our news media has become.

21 posted on 07/05/2009 6:47:41 PM PDT by Vigilanteman (Are there any men left in Washington? Or, are there only cowards? Ahmad Shah Massoud)
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To: Vigilanteman

I believe it was Sean Hannity who said 2008 is when the media died.


22 posted on 07/05/2009 8:00:57 PM PDT by Kaslin (Acronym for 0bama: One Big Ass Mistake America)
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To: Kaslin
I just spent six hours in the car today. The top of the hour news was about the Steve McNair shooting, Michael Jackson funeral tickets, Palin resignation news, and a shooter in North or South Carolina.

An athlete, a musician/pedophile, a politician, and a criminal.

Nothing about the effects of cap and trade, Iranian revolutions, that California and other states are issuing IOUs because the politicians have so botched up running the states, nothing.

Rush is right. We're living in the United States of Entertainment.

23 posted on 07/05/2009 9:34:46 PM PDT by Lizavetta (Politicians: When they're not lying, they're stealing.)
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