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SWAT Gone Wild in Maryland
Reason Magazine ^ | July 13, 2009 | Radley Balko

Posted on 07/14/2009 4:28:15 PM PDT by Leisler

Late last month, Berwyn Heights, Maryland Mayor Cheye Calvo took the unusual step of filing a civil rights lawsuit against the police department of his own county. The suit stems from a 2008 SWAT team raid on Calvo's house that resulted in the shooting deaths of his two black Labrador retrievers. In pushing back against the abuse he suffered at the hands of the Prince George's County police department, the mayor is helping expose a more widespread pattern of law enforcement carelessness and callousness throughout the state of Maryland.

Prince George's police originally obtained a warrant to search Calvo's home after intercepting a package of marijuana sent to the mayor's address. Calvo and his family were innocent—the package was intended to be picked up by a drug dealer. But instead of first investigating who lived at the residence, or even notifying the Berwyn Heights police chief, the county police department immediately sent in the SWAT team. In addition to having his two dogs killed, Calvo and his mother-in-law were handcuffed for several hours, and questioned at gunpoint.

To his credit, the mayor concluded early on that if this could happen to him, it was probably happening to others. "In some ways, we were lucky," Calvo said at a University of Maryland event this April. "We had the support of our community, who knew we weren't drug dealers. It didn't take long for me to realize that many people this kind of thing happens to don't have that kind of support."

Calvo also learned just how obstinate and unapologetic police and government officials can be, even (or especially) when they're clearly in the wrong. Prince George's County Police Chief Melvin High actually praised his officers' conduct, insisting that if they had to do it again they'd conduct the Calvo raid the same way. "Our investigators went in and showed both restraint and compassion," he told a local TV station.

Prince George's County Executive Jack Johnson told a local newspaper that Calvo would get no apology for the slaying of his dogs. Johnson's puzzling explanation: "Well, I think in America that is the apology, when we’re cleared.... At the end of the day, the investigation showed he was not involved. And that's, you know, a pat on the back for everybody involved, I think."

It took nearly a year for the Prince George's police department to release its report on the incident. The conclusion: officers did nothing wrong.

Within a few weeks of the raid, other victims of botched search warrants in Maryland began contacting Calvo. One couple was raided after their teenage son was found with a small amount of marijuana during a traffic stop. Another elderly couple had their dog shot and killed by Prince George's officers in a mistaken raid. And in Howard County, police broke down a door in front of a 12-year-old girl, battered a man with a police shield, then shot and killed the man's Australian cattle dog. They were looking for someone suspected of stealing a rifle from a police car. The suspect didn't live at the residence.

There were more:

• Eleven days before the raid on Calvo's home, Prince George's police raided the home of a Secret Service agent after receiving a tip that he was distributing steroids. They found no drugs or incriminating evidence.

• In August 2007 police raided the home of a Prince George's County couple to serve an outstanding arrest warrant for their son. The parents were handcuffed at gunpoint. Police later learned that the couple's son had already been in police custody for 12 days.

• In November 2007 Prince George's police raided the wrong home of a couple in Accokeek. Though the couple presented the police with evidence that they were at the wrong address, the police still detained them at gunpoint, refusing even to let them go to the bathroom. The couple asked the police if they could bring their pet boxer in from the backyard. The police refused. Moments later, the police shot and killed the dog.

• In June 2007 police in Annapolis deployed a flash grenade, broke open an apartment door, and kicked a man in the groin during a mistaken drug raid. When they later served the warrant on the correct address, they found no drugs.

Most victims of these mistaken raids experienced the same callousness and indifference from public officials that Calvo did. When police in Montgomery County conducted a mistaken 4 a.m. raid on a Kenyan immigrant and her teenage daughters in 2005, the county offered free movie passes as compensation. When police in Baltimore mistakenly raided the home of 33-year-old Andrew Leonard last May, the city refused to pay for Leonard's door, which was destroyed during the break-in. When Leonard called the city's bulk trash pick-up to come get the door, no one came. Days later, city code inspectors fined Leonard $50 for storing the broken door in his backyard.

Just last month, Baltimore's ABC affiliate reported on another mistaken raid, and noted that city officials generally make no effort to compensate homeowners when police trash their houses in search of contraband that doesn't turn up. "If you're searching for drugs or unlawful firearms, these things are not left out in plain view on the living room table," City Solicitor George Nilson explained. "You often will have to do some damage to the premises and...the police department doesn't and we don't pay for those kinds of damages." Even if the police find nothing, Nilson said, the city has no obligation to pay, because, "it may have been the stuff that you're looking for was there three hours earlier, but somebody got it out of harm's way."

At least none of these raids ended with the loss of human life. In January 2005, police in Baltimore County conducted a 4:50 a.m. raid on the home of Cheryl Lynn and Charles Noel after finding marijuana seeds and cocaine residue in the family's trash. After taking down the front door and deploying a flash grenade, SWAT officers stormed up the steps and broke open the door to the Noels' bedroom. Because their daughter had been murdered several years earlier, the couple kept a gun near the bed. When the police entered the bedroom, 44-year-old Cheryl Lynn Noel stood with the gun, clad in her nightgown. She was shot and killed by an armor-wearing SWAT officer, who fired from behind a ballistics shield. Police found only a misdemeanor amount of illicit drugs in the home. Shortly after the family filed a civil rights lawsuit in 2006, Baltimore County gave the officer who shot Noel an award for "valor, courage, honor, and bravery."

In March, a federal jury returned a verdict in favor of the police. The winning argument in the Noel case is a common one—but it's also paradoxical. Police argued both that these volatile, confrontational tactics are necessary to surprise drug suspects—to take them off guard before they have a chance to retaliate, or dispose of the contraband. At the same time, police argued that Cheryl Lynn Noel should have known the armed men storming her home at 5 a.m. were police; therefore she had no right to be holding a gun, and the police had every right to shoot her. Unfortunately, under the law the jury (and the police) was probably correct. The police didn't appear to violate any department policy.

It's the policy that's the problem. Drug war hysteria has so twisted our sense of right and wrong over the last 30 years that we've come to accept the idea that sending SWAT teams after minor potential drug offenders is an acceptable police tactic. The occasional wrong house, murdered pet, or police killing of a mother of two are regarded as regrettable but acceptable collateral damage—the price we pay to keep drugs illegal.

Maryland is hardly unusual. The last 30 years have seen a massive increase in the use of SWAT and paramilitary police tactics. High-profile botched raids like the Calvo incident occur all over the country. They inevitably get reporters digging and activists looking—and generally finding—other victims who were too frightened or embarrassed to come forward earlier. That's usually followed by promises for reform...then a return to business as usual once the attention dies down.

But something good may yet come out of Maryland. Mayor Calvo was able to get first-in-the-nation legislation passed in his state that will bring some transparency to how police agencies use their SWAT teams. Every department will be required to submit a quarterly report detailing each SWAT deployment.

That at least is a start. It will enable some honest assessment of just how often these tactics are used, and what they're actually turning up. Terrible as it sounds, it may well take more mistaken raids on high-status victims like Calvo to generate real debate over the wisdom of using violent, high-risk police tactics to serve warrants for nonviolent crimes


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Crime/Corruption; Culture/Society; Front Page News; Government; US: Maryland
KEYWORDS: banglist; calvo; corruption; cwii; cwiiping; donutwatch; jackbootedthugs; jackboots; jbt; leo; liberalfascism; lping; nannystate; policestate; pot; rapeofliberty; swat; wod; wosd
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1 posted on 07/14/2009 4:28:16 PM PDT by Leisler
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To: upchuck; dcwusmc; sickoflibs; Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Nanny state/Maryland ping!


2 posted on 07/14/2009 4:30:41 PM PDT by rabscuttle385 ("If this be treason, then make the most of it!" —Patrick Henry)
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To: Leisler

Only in The Peoples Republic of Maryland.....


3 posted on 07/14/2009 4:31:11 PM PDT by DCPatriot ("It aint what you don't know that kills you. It's what you know that aint so" Theodore Sturgeon))
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To: upchuck

Okay, I don’t know why I pinged you on this. Disregard.


4 posted on 07/14/2009 4:31:56 PM PDT by rabscuttle385 ("If this be treason, then make the most of it!" —Patrick Henry)
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To: bamahead
It's the policy that's the problem. Drug war hysteria has so twisted our sense of right and wrong over the last 30 years that we've come to accept the idea that sending SWAT teams after minor potential drug offenders is an acceptable police tactic. The occasional wrong house, murdered pet, or police killing of a mother of two are regarded as regrettable but acceptable collateral damage—the price we pay to keep drugs illegal.
5 posted on 07/14/2009 4:32:14 PM PDT by rabscuttle385 ("If this be treason, then make the most of it!" —Patrick Henry)
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To: Leisler
Prince George's police originally obtained a warrant to search Calvo's home...

I remember this case but my facts may be wrong...I recollect, if they had a warrant, it wasn't a no knock warrant.

6 posted on 07/14/2009 4:36:03 PM PDT by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: Leisler

PG Country PD has been a problem for about the last 40 years.

More recently, about 10 years ago I did a 911 to the PG PD about some guy blithely doing afternoon car break-ins at one of the Laurel shopping malls. I stood there waiting for 5 minutes, 10 minutes, 20 minutes..... nothing.

They never showed up.

I left, with the guy still walking through the lot and casually breaking into parked cars.


7 posted on 07/14/2009 4:36:29 PM PDT by angkor
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To: Leisler
Good lord. May I never find myself in Prince George county. It's hard to know if I'd survive an encounter with the county Gestapo, but there's no way my dogs would.

Why do they like killing dogs so much? Is that legal for them to just kill people's animals and then get an "atta'boy" for it?

8 posted on 07/14/2009 4:37:13 PM PDT by GBA
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To: DCPatriot

PG County is its very own mini banana republic.


9 posted on 07/14/2009 4:37:56 PM PDT by silverleaf (Save the earth. It's the only planet with chocolate!)
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To: rabscuttle385

You really have to wonder how many of these “legal raids” end up with a suspect shot for “resisting.”

Not to pile on the cops, but these situations seem well above and beyond responsible and professional work.


10 posted on 07/14/2009 4:38:21 PM PDT by sbMKE
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To: Leisler

just another reason why i hate cops


11 posted on 07/14/2009 4:39:20 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th
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To: Leisler
When police in Baltimore mistakenly raided the home of 33-year-old Andrew Leonard last May, the city refused to pay for Leonard's door, which was destroyed during the break-in. When Leonard called the city's bulk trash pick-up to come get the door, no one came. Days later, city code inspectors fined Leonard $50 for storing the broken door in his backyard.

Sue'em. Jerks.

12 posted on 07/14/2009 4:47:50 PM PDT by marron
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To: silverleaf
"PG County is its very own mini banana republic."

And to think it used to be quite conservative and Republican in the past. Even had a Republican Congressman. Really. I was there. It's now totally weird.

13 posted on 07/14/2009 4:58:40 PM PDT by StormEye
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To: Repeal The 17th

No reason to hate all cops. Most of them are good people, and a lot of them will tell ya in private the war on drugs is a joke, a waste of resources, tax money and everything else.

Unfortunately, a lot of cops have lost sight of the fact that they are there to help or assist, and find themselves with the us vs them mentality due to being around so many bad people and assorted freaks.

Most cops are totally burned out, and many just get to the point where they want to escape people, which I can totally relate to.


14 posted on 07/14/2009 5:00:34 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: Leisler

It takes harm to an official before anything is done.

More deaths from illegals driving drunk are happening everyday.

Pray that those deaths are those of governors and legislatures wives, children, grandchildren. That’s the ONLY way anything is going to change on that front too.

The Governors and other elected officials could care less about what happens to the rest of us.


15 posted on 07/14/2009 5:04:28 PM PDT by Balding_Eagle (Overproduction, one of the top five worries for the American farmer.)
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To: Repeal The 17th

Not good Karma. There may be a day in which you change your mind. There are bad apples in every basket. 99% are straight shooters that face the dregs of society on a nightly basis.

Think about it...


16 posted on 07/14/2009 5:07:54 PM PDT by halfright (My presidents picture is in the dictionary, next to the word, "rectum".)
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To: Leisler
There is NO reason, rationalization, or justification for the existence of paramilitary units equipped with black uniforms, face masks, full body armor, assault weapons, explosives, and armored vehicles at the local or county level. If these boys want to play Rambo they should visit their local Army or Marine recruiter and know what it is like to kick in doors with the likelihood of a real armed and trained opponent on the other side.
17 posted on 07/14/2009 5:12:57 PM PDT by Natural Law
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To: dragnet2
Most cops are totally burned out, and many just get to the point where they want to escape people, which I can totally relate to.

Union thugs. They NEED people to be thugs. And dogs to be killers.

You totally relate to these guys???

18 posted on 07/14/2009 5:16:29 PM PDT by spald
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To: halfright
Cops have NEVER stopped someone from hurting my family or property.

Cops have NEVER responded in a timely manner to my calls.

Cops have cost me a lot of money and time.

Cops are DANGEROUS with guns. Number one cause of cop deaths is fratricide.

Cops HAVE pulled my best buddy's girlfriend out of her car in the middle of the night and beat the crap out of her - to get even with my friend.

Cops killed one of my best friends whom they had misidentified and then gunned him down in cold blood.

I have seen cops LIE their a$$ off in court which I later impeached with video evidence.

I have beaten every traffic ticket I have ever been given and have NEVER been convicted of any crime or spent a day or night in jail.

I will not express my opinion about cops but you get the drift. Oh and I do not worry about karma.

19 posted on 07/14/2009 5:19:04 PM PDT by mad_as_he$$ (Nemo me impune lacessit)
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To: spald

Yeah.


20 posted on 07/14/2009 5:24:26 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: mad_as_he$$

I am sorry for your feeling that way. I come from a long line of professional police officers. I can assure you they did the job they agreed to do with out regards to the usual caveats.

I sleep well knowing the men and women serving do so with the best intentions.


21 posted on 07/14/2009 5:25:30 PM PDT by halfright (My presidents picture is in the dictionary, next to the word, "rectum".)
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To: Leisler
• Eleven days before the raid on Calvo's home, Prince George's police raided the home of a Secret Service agent after receiving a tip that he was distributing steroids. They found no drugs or incriminating evidence.

They make a no-knock raid on no more than a tip. What kind of judge issues a warrant on no more than a tip?

• In November 2007 Prince George's police raided the wrong home of a couple in Accokeek. Though the couple presented the police with evidence that they were at the wrong address, the police still detained them at gunpoint, refusing even to let them go to the bathroom. The couple asked the police if they could bring their pet boxer in from the backyard. The police refused. Moments later, the police shot and killed the dog.

Now how can this be acceptable behavior? How can they get away with not paying restitution for damages in this case? They were at the wrong house they knew they were at the wrong house and they kept the home owners in restraints and killed their dog. This in my mind is unlawful imprisonment or kidnapping.

This no-knock raid stuff is gutting the Forth and Fifth Amendments.

22 posted on 07/14/2009 5:30:46 PM PDT by Pontiac (Your message here.)
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To: dragnet2; halfright

After nearly 60 years on this planet,
I ain’t never had no need for ‘em,
other than clerical duties for insurance claims.
All I ever ran into were grown-up school-yard bullies.
But now with a badge and a gun.
Nope, just don’t like ‘em.
Not my kind of folks.


23 posted on 07/14/2009 5:32:09 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th
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To: dragnet2
You're a sick puppy then. Breaking the law, lying for the blue line and all that's included in the article at the top? These illegal search and seizures.

Yeah, you say? You totally relate to all that?

24 posted on 07/14/2009 5:55:48 PM PDT by spald
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To: spald

Read my post ya fruitcake.


25 posted on 07/14/2009 5:57:20 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: dragnet2

Fruitcake? Watta you a homo?


26 posted on 07/14/2009 6:05:00 PM PDT by spald
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To: Leisler
Maybe he should disband the local SWAT team.


27 posted on 07/14/2009 6:08:36 PM PDT by wastedyears (The Tree is thirsty and the hogs are hungry.)
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Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

Comment #29 Removed by Moderator

To: zot

Ping.


30 posted on 07/14/2009 6:19:41 PM PDT by Interesting Times (For the truth about "swift boating" see ToSetTheRecordStraight.com)
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To: spald
you are so disingenuous

OK, I'll play. Specifically what part of my post where you called me a sick puppy was disingenuous? Remember what I said, as opposed to what you said and or added. lol..

31 posted on 07/14/2009 6:32:10 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: spald
You're a dirty dog alright.

LOL

32 posted on 07/14/2009 6:32:53 PM PDT by dragnet2
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To: rabscuttle385; Abathar; Abcdefg; Abram; Abundy; akatel; albertp; AlexandriaDuke; Alexander Rubin; ..



Libertarian ping! Click here to get added or here to be removed or post a message here!
(View past Libertarian pings here)
33 posted on 07/14/2009 6:35:30 PM PDT by bamahead (Few men desire liberty; most men wish only for a just master. -- Sallust)
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To: Leisler; Abundy; Albion Wilde; AlwaysFree; AnnaSASsyFR; bayliving; BFM; cindy-true-supporter; ...

So, who peed on their donuts?

Maryland “Freak State” PING!


34 posted on 07/14/2009 6:51:48 PM PDT by Tolerance Sucks Rocks (Barack Obama: in your guts, you know he's nuts!)
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To: Interesting Times

Thanks for the ping. This can happen to anyone in PG County at any time. The attackers are supported by the politicians and the courts.


35 posted on 07/14/2009 6:53:00 PM PDT by zot
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To: Leisler
About ten years ago our house was mistakenly raided and searched by the King County Swat Team. They made a mess, upset my wife and our dogs and refused to give a coherent explanation for their actions. They were rude and offered no apologies. I work with the police on a daily basis as a Fire Lieutenant. I still don't know what to think or how to feel about what happened. Every police officer I have ever mentioned it to has just laughed about it. They seem to take this type of mistake pretty lightly.
36 posted on 07/14/2009 7:30:30 PM PDT by fireman15 (Check your facts before making ignorant statements.)
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To: fireman15
Every police officer I have ever mentioned it to has just laughed about it. They seem to take this type of mistake pretty lightly.

Thin blue line. The brotherhood of cops prevents them from admitting the cold facts of their error.

37 posted on 07/14/2009 7:47:41 PM PDT by Drango (A liberal's compassion is limited only by the size of someone else's wallet.)
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To: fireman15

I’m thinking that should their houses ever catch fire... that the fire department might be ‘delayed’ in arrival, eh?


38 posted on 07/14/2009 8:27:04 PM PDT by gogogodzilla (Live free or die!)
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To: fireman15

You are very lucky they didn’t just kill your dogs...like they did Mayor Cheye Calvos.


39 posted on 07/15/2009 5:23:10 AM PDT by bamahead (Few men desire liberty; most men wish only for a just master. -- Sallust)
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To: Leisler

This is a disgrace. When will citizens start shooting back? The time is fast approaching to water the tree of liberty with the blood of patriots and tyrannts.


40 posted on 07/15/2009 5:50:36 AM PDT by DCBryan1 ( Arm Pilots&Teachers. Build the Wall. Export Illegals. Profile Muslims. Execute child molesters RFN!)
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To: halfright

You may sleep well thinking that cops do so with the best intentions, halfright, but I don’t. Some good, some crooked. Some just down right mean. Luckily where I live, the bad cops are gotten rid of over time. But it takes a while. And people do pay in the process.

I don’t trust cops unless I know them outside of being a cop. Good rule to follow, I think.


41 posted on 07/15/2009 6:01:39 AM PDT by morkfork (Candygram for Mongo)
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To: DCPatriot

So glad I left it, but these swat commandos are everywhere, I’m sure some are competent professionals, but most are just authoritarian personalities who revel in their jack booted facist roles. I have no use for law enforcement.


42 posted on 07/15/2009 6:12:11 AM PDT by east1234 (It's the borders stupid! My new environmentalist inspired tagline: cut, kill, dig and drill)
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To: Leisler

One of the reasons drug raids are a sacred cow for police departments is that the real dealers have loads of cash and other materials that can be seized by the Department. Bling, tricked-out high-end vehicles, all the trappings of the dealer’s life can be confiscated and sold at auction. This is a non-tax, extra-budgetary source of revenue that, consciously or unconsciously, PD’s may not want to give up. So they work themselves into a permanent state of hysteria over drugs in order to justify their “habit.”


43 posted on 07/15/2009 6:28:03 AM PDT by Albion Wilde (If ten percent is good enough for Jesus, it ought to be good enough for Uncle Sam. --Ray Stevens)
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To: fireman15

... refused to give a coherent explanation for their actions.


I would guess that the raid on your house was a training exercise.

Sorry to hear about your experience

44 posted on 07/15/2009 6:30:57 AM PDT by EdReform (The right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed *NRA*JPFO*SAF*GOA*SAS*CCRKBA)
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To: StormEye
And to think it used to be quite conservative and Republican in the past. Even had a Republican Congressman. Really. I was there. It's now totally weird.

Me, too. We could walk to school and to the shopping malls. We had the conservative Washington Star newspaper in our house -- never the Washington Post. Then the government decided to start changing society. Now we have a third-world county right next to the Nation's Capital. We can't even go to visit our family's graves that go back to the early 1800s in Rock Creek and Fort Lincoln without carrying a gun.

45 posted on 07/15/2009 6:33:37 AM PDT by Albion Wilde (If ten percent is good enough for Jesus, it ought to be good enough for Uncle Sam. --Ray Stevens)
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To: DCBryan1
This is a disgrace. When will citizens start shooting back? The time is fast approaching to water the tree of liberty with the blood of patriots and tyrannts.

That is an ignorant thing to say. If you read the article, it says that the SWAT officers who did break into a bedroom in the wee hours of the morning shot the woman who held a gun -- and that they were behind bullet-proof shields with face masks. The first rule of police training when confronted with an armed suspect pointing a gun at the officer is to shoot first. The travesty took place in the courts, who refused to recognize the woman's right to self-defense from an unknown assailant in the middle of the night.

Taking this to court as a class action is the first step, which it sounds like Calvo is doing.

46 posted on 07/15/2009 6:47:18 AM PDT by Albion Wilde (If ten percent is good enough for Jesus, it ought to be good enough for Uncle Sam. --Ray Stevens)
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To: morkfork
You may sleep well thinking that cops do so with the best intentions, halfright, but I don’t. Some good, some crooked. Some just down right mean. Luckily where I live, the bad cops are gotten rid of over time. But it takes a while. And people do pay in the process.

Since I moved to Maryland, I have personally witnessed police misconduct based on arrogance on three occasions that cost citizens time, money, lost days at work and gratuitous fear. There was a huge ice slick on a hillside near here with six cars already in the ditch. A red-faced cop insisted that other (stopped) motorists proceed down the road, whistling and waving angrily. Soon there were 18 cars in a huge smackpile at the bottom of the hill, grimly exchanging insurance information in the bitter cold while no one was getting to work or school. That's just one example.

The cops in Maryland have quota days when they arrest people for speeding, and many ludicrous speed traps in which to do it. They have two beltways and a huge superhighway that are opportunities for "enterprise." While I am grateful when they arrest a genuine speeder and lane-switcher, often they merely go after the low-hanging fruit.

47 posted on 07/15/2009 6:54:36 AM PDT by Albion Wilde (If ten percent is good enough for Jesus, it ought to be good enough for Uncle Sam. --Ray Stevens)
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To: DCBryan1

This is a disgrace. When will citizens start shooting back? The time is fast approaching to water the tree of liberty with the blood of patriots and tyrannts.


Indeed. These raids are a violent gang rape of personal liberty.

48 posted on 07/15/2009 6:56:53 AM PDT by EdReform (The right of the people to keep and bear Arms shall not be infringed *NRA*JPFO*SAF*GOA*SAS*CCRKBA)
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To: Pontiac
Eleven days before the raid on Calvo's home, Prince George's police raided the home of a Secret Service agent after receiving a tip that he was distributing steroids. They found no drugs or incriminating evidence.

They make a no-knock raid on no more than a tip. What kind of judge issues a warrant on no more than a tip?

What does it matter? The information itself is useful.

Take a play out of the libs' playbook and overwhelm the system. If you live in Prince Georges County, drop a dime on someone. Take your pick: the budding community activist, the head of the HOA, the liberal "cool" teacher, the environmentalist, the loudmouth lib at the office, or any other annoying liberal. Keep them busy with something other than complaining about gas guzzling, SUV driving, meat eating, church attending, racist, sexist, homophobic, right wing extremists.

49 posted on 07/15/2009 7:00:54 AM PDT by Betty Jane
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To: Leisler
“In January 2005, police in Baltimore County conducted a 4:50 a.m. raid on the home of Cheryl Lynn and Charles Noel after finding marijuana seeds and cocaine residue in the family's trash”

So they go through your trash?
Cocaine residue?
Seeds?

Has anyone checked their bird food lately?
It contains the same seeds.?
parrot owners beware!

This is as petty as it could possibly be.

::spit::

50 posted on 07/15/2009 7:21:10 AM PDT by woollyone (I believe God created me- you believe you're related to monkeys. Of course I laughed at you!)
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