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Buh-Bye, Walter Cronkite: He Lost the Vietnam War for U.S. on TV, Had American Blood on His Hands
debbieschlussel.com ^ | 7/17/2009 | Debbie Schlussel

Posted on 07/17/2009 7:51:49 PM PDT by Sioux-san

I just heard the news that former CBS anchorman Walter Cronkite died. And perhaps I will be one of the few with the guts to be real and say it: I'm not sad to see this overrated liar go. Buh-bye.

Cronkite enjoyed a long and glamorous life, unlike many of our late teen and 20-something American troops against whom he editorialized on a nightly basis. They died on the killing fields of Vietnam in no small part because he contributed to the video demoralization of America and the resulting lack of commitment to help our boys win the Vietnam War.

I'm sure that Cronkite will be remembered gushingly by all of the liberal mainstream media robots whom he spawned and who idolize him (and probably many gutless idiots on the right, too). In so many ways, he is their Michael Jackson, minus the creativity and talent. In life, they already exalted Cronkite far, far beyond what he deserved and completely ignored his awful transgressions against our country.

Walter Cronkite Defeated America on TV But the man they called "The Most Trusted Man in America" was really something far different: The Most Destructive Man in America. And that is how he should be remembered. He had the blood of thousands of American men--some of them really just boys--on his hands.

(Excerpt) Read more at debbieschlussel.com ...


TOPICS: Front Page News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cbsnews; cronkite; debbieschlussel; vietnamwar
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Debbie tells it like it is and was.
1 posted on 07/17/2009 7:51:49 PM PDT by Sioux-san
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To: Sioux-san

He almost made it to the 40th anniversary of Chappaquiddick.


2 posted on 07/17/2009 7:52:31 PM PDT by Paleo Conservative
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To: Sioux-san

I agree with her 100% and thank her for telling it like it was.


3 posted on 07/17/2009 7:53:44 PM PDT by PhiKapMom (Mary Fallin - OK Gov/Coburn/Rubio - Senate 2010 !)
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To: Sioux-san

Tell it Debbie!


4 posted on 07/17/2009 7:55:32 PM PDT by wally_bert (My doctor says that I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fibre)
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To: Sioux-san; Allegra; big'ol_freeper; Lil'freeper; TrueKnightGalahad; blackie; Larry Lucido; ...
And that's... the way it was!
5 posted on 07/17/2009 7:56:03 PM PDT by Bender2 ("I've got a twisted sense of humor, and everything amuses me." RAH Beyond this Horizon)
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To: Paleo Conservative

Maybe a certain person won’t either and I won’t be upset in the least if he didn’t.


6 posted on 07/17/2009 7:56:23 PM PDT by wally_bert (My doctor says that I have a malformed public-duty gland and a natural deficiency in moral fibre)
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To: Sioux-san

Walter Cronkite is another one who had better have a VERY good drainage system around his grave site as there are millions of Viet Nam vests who are waiting patiently to water the flora an fauna in that immediate vicinity!


7 posted on 07/17/2009 7:56:52 PM PDT by Bigun ("It is difficult to free fools from the chains they revere." Voltaire)
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To: Sioux-san

Goodbye to him and goodbye to types like him controlling what we hear.


8 posted on 07/17/2009 7:57:21 PM PDT by fallingwater
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To: Sioux-san

Now watch in about six months it comes out that he was a deep cover commie working for the NKVD during WW2 and later the KGB.Would anybody be surprised?


9 posted on 07/17/2009 7:58:23 PM PDT by HANG THE EXPENSE (I am Jim Thompson,Life is tough.It's even tougher when you're stupid.)
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To: Sioux-san

Deb is telling it like it is.

Burn the paint off’em Deb.


10 posted on 07/17/2009 7:58:27 PM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: Sioux-san

Excellent post. The old man sailed with the Clintons and pimped for the world’s communists and dictators. Goodbye.


11 posted on 07/17/2009 7:58:30 PM PDT by Luke21
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To: Sioux-san

She’s right about Cronkite; wrong about Palin.


12 posted on 07/17/2009 7:59:57 PM PDT by Perdogg (Sarah Palin-Jim DeMint 2012 - Liz Cheney for Sec of State - Duncan Hunter SecDef)
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To: Sioux-san
Exactly. Cronkite's coverage of Vietnam was treasonous.

In December 1972, Ronald Reagan called President Richard Nixon after watching Walter Cronkite's coverage of the Vietnam War on "CBS News," telling Nixon that "under World War II circumstances, the network would have been charged with treason."

13 posted on 07/17/2009 8:00:07 PM PDT by BuckeyeTexan (Integrity, Character, Leadership, and Loyalty matter - Be an example, no matter the cost.)
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To: Sioux-san
Profiles In Bias
14 posted on 07/17/2009 8:00:26 PM PDT by South40 (Islam has a proud tradition of tolerance. ~Hussein Obama, Cairo, Egypt, June 4, 2009)
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To: Sioux-san

Jane Fonda.......Walter Cronkite......both opposed the Viet Nam war....and many brave young men died as a result of their efforts. No RIP for you, Walter......you do not deserve it!!!!!


15 posted on 07/17/2009 8:00:28 PM PDT by Doctor Don
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To: Sioux-san

Not entirely. The VC and NVA were defeated militarily at a much greater cost of lives than was necessary in part because of traitors like Uncle Walter. Nevertheless, they were defeated. In fact, the VC ceased to exist as a fighting force after TET. But the collapse of South Vietnam and its army occurred after American troops were gone because of the traitor liberals that controlled the government after the 1974 Congressional elections (Watergate and all that).


16 posted on 07/17/2009 8:00:58 PM PDT by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
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To: Sioux-san; a fool in paradise

Thank you, ma’am for telling like it was.

It is beyond belief how America worships its traitors and Communist fellow travelers. I wouldn’t be surprised to learn that good ole Walter was a KGB mole. But it really doesn’t matter...


17 posted on 07/17/2009 8:01:41 PM PDT by Revolting cat! (Let us prey!)
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To: Sioux-san

I will remember him for being a ‘journalist’ but I will likewise remember him for his liberalism, bias, and use of yellow journalism...


18 posted on 07/17/2009 8:02:08 PM PDT by cranked
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To: Revolting cat!

So Walter bites the dust....who are the next two then?

....always comes in three’s ya know :)


19 posted on 07/17/2009 8:02:33 PM PDT by ak267
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To: Sioux-san
"Walter Lied and Many, Many Died"

Probably has a big fanbase with the Khmer Rouge though.

20 posted on 07/17/2009 8:03:17 PM PDT by BallyBill (Serial Hit-N-Run poster)
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To: Paleo Conservative
Clever and apt observation P. C.

.

21 posted on 07/17/2009 8:03:40 PM PDT by Seaplaner (Never give in. Never give in. Never...except to convictions of honour and good sense. W. Churchill)
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To: Sioux-san

Still doesn’t explain why he was so believed particularly about the Tet battle. Why didn’t Mr. and Mrs. America tell him to get lost?


22 posted on 07/17/2009 8:03:51 PM PDT by AceMineral (Offically unapproved of since 1973)
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To: Sioux-san

Go to YouTube and watch the FULL video of Walter on the day of JFK’s assassination. He is putting his own opinion out there that it was probably the work of right wingers! How come most people never see this footage? We only see him taking his glasses off to shed a tear. Go back and watch from the beginning and you’ll see a clearer picture of Walter’s politics. It was there if you had the eyes to see.

How they had egg on their faces when it turned out to be a commie who killed him.


23 posted on 07/17/2009 8:04:01 PM PDT by deannadurbin
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To: Sioux-san; All
From 2008...

Walter Cronkite, Vietnam, and the Decline of Media Credibility

Walter Cronkite’s remarks at the end of his February 27, 1968 evening news broadcast, four decades ago today, were a watershed in the history of the MSM’s credibility.  

Unless you’re at least 55 years old, you probably don’t remember that CBS broadcast 40 years ago.  The most trusted man in America had recently returned from Vietnam where he hosted a documentary on the VC/NVA TET (New Year) offensive that began January 31, 1968.  Back in NYC, he closed his program that night by introducing “an analysis that must be speculative, personal, [and] subjective.”  Among his comments were these:

Who won and who lost in the great Tet offensive against the cities?  I’m not sure.  The Vietcong did not win by a knockout, but neither did we.  The referees of history may make it a draw.

It seems now more certain than ever that the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate.

But it is increasingly clear to this reporter that the only rational way out then will be to negotiate, not as victors, but as honorable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy, and did the best they could.  (Emphases added)

Most evenings Cronkite ended his broadcasts with “And that’s the way it is.”  That night he ended with a more somber, “This is Walter Cronkite. Good night.”

Today, it’s hard to fully appreciate the stature and status Cronkite held in 1968.  He was the successor in fame to the demigod persona that had been Edward R. Murrow.  When President Johnson heard of Cronkite’s comments, he was quoted as saying, “That’s it.  If I’ve lost Cronkite, I’ve lost middle America.”

In January 2006,  Cronkite said his statement on Vietnam was his proudest moment.  When asked then if he would give the same advice on Iraq, Cronkite didn’t hesitate to say “Yes.”

At the time, Cronkite’s pronouncement added credibility and importance to all the network anchors.  His was a stunning exercise of media power.  But, in the perspective of history, the outcome of his pronouncement is not universally recognized as having been positive.  He overtly and figuratively stepped out from behind the microphone to add his personal commentary to the news.  We had not seen this before.  By doing so, Cronkite issued an implicit license to his journalistic colleagues to interject personal opinions into their factual reporting of the news.  The difference is that Cronkite clearly labeled it as personal opinion, while many MSM news personalities today weave their opinions into reporting. His sentiment registered with many, perhaps most, of his viewers that night.  He changed opinions by offering his own.  But in hindsight, his analysis was wrong – dead wrong for some.

Generally, the “referees of history” have not rendered the TET offensive a military draw.  The VC/NVA suffered unexpectedly high casualties, from which it took years to recover.  In particular, the ranks of the Viet Cong were decimated.  General No Nguyen Giap, the Supreme Commander of the Viet Minh (NVA) forces said, in a 1989 interview with CBS’s Morley Safer,
“We paid a high price, but so did you…not only in lives and material…After Tet the Americans had to back down and come to the negotiating table, because the war was not only moving into…dozens of cities and towns in South Vietnam, but also to the living rooms of Americans back home for some time. The most important result of the Tet offensive was it made you de-escalate the bombing, and it brought you to the negotiation table.  It was, therefore, a victory…The war was fought on many fronts.  At that time the most important one was American public opinion.” (The Vietnam War: An Encyclopedia of Quotations, Howard Langer, 2005)

The Vietnam War did not end in a stalemate, particularly for those S. Vietnamese who, at risk and often loss of life, loyally supported the U.S. Armed Forces (not all did, but very many did).  We left them in a lurch, cut off their military aid, and watched while they suffered the consequences when the North Vietnamese blatantly ignored the negotiated resolution (they never intended to honor) that Cronkite advocated.  

Many of those of us who served in Vietnam do not look upon its ending as reflecting “honorable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy.”  A compelling case can be made that we should never have sent troops to Vietnam in the first place.  But we did. And then, after nearly 60,000 U.S. deaths and countless Vietnamese casualties, we bugged out. There’s no way to put an honorable face on that unavoidable truth.

Once upon a time, I lived for awhile not far from a village called Ba Chuc in An Giang Province in the Mekong Delta.  After the U.S. evacuated Vietnam, there was nothing to stop old animosities between the Cambodians and Vietnamese from turning hot.  Here’s a description of what happened in Ba Chuc.
“On April 30, 1977, Pol Pot’s troops launched a surprise attack on 13 villages in eight Vietnamese border provinces. Ba Chuc was the hardest hit. The massacre was at its fiercest during the 12 days of occupation, April 18-30, 1978, during which the intruders killed 3,157 villagers. The survivors fled and took refuge in the pagodas of Tam Buu and Phi Lai or in caves on Mount Tuong, but they were soon discovered. The raiders shot them, slit their throats or beat them to death with sticks. Babies were flung into the air and pierced with bayonets. Women were raped and left to die with stakes planted in their genitals.”

There were two survivors to the massacre

Cronkite didn’t cover it on the CBS evening news.

As judged by subsequent events, Cronkite was wrong.  And over time, his words became a watershed marking the place where the gradual erosion of the MSM’s credibility began.  

http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/02/walter_cronkite_vietnam_and_th.html

24 posted on 07/17/2009 8:04:07 PM PDT by ETL (ALL the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: Sioux-san

OH don’t say that about the “First” lying SOB on TV...Please, he didn’t mean to call the Tet Offensive as a loser when we didn’t lose a battle......don’t ...please don’t tell it like it is...IS...


25 posted on 07/17/2009 8:06:13 PM PDT by 4Speed
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To: Sioux-san
One thing I like about Debbie, she tells it straight and in color.

In this case, as usual, she's spot on.

---

Send treats to the troops...
Great because you did it!
www.AnySoldier.com

26 posted on 07/17/2009 8:07:37 PM PDT by JCG
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To: ak267
>who are the next two then?

There's a rumor, here,
that there may have been trouble
at the new Iron Man . . .

27 posted on 07/17/2009 8:08:34 PM PDT by theFIRMbss
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To: Sioux-san

http://www.frontpagemag.com/readArticle.aspx?ARTID=13274

What did the North Vietnamese leadership think of the American antiwar movement? What was the purpose of the Tet Offensive? How could the U.S. have been more successful in fighting the Vietnam War? Bui Tin, a former colonel in the North Vietnamese army, answers these questions in the following excerpts from an interview conducted by Stephen Young, a Minnesota attorney and human-rights activist [in The Wall Street Journal, 3 August 1995]. Bui Tin, who served on the general staff of North Vietnam’s army, received the unconditional surrender of South Vietnam on April 30, 1975. He later became editor of the People’s Daily, the official newspaper of Vietnam. He now lives in Paris, where he immigrated after becoming disillusioned with the fruits of Vietnamese communism.

Question: How did Hanoi intend to defeat the Americans?

Answer: By fighting a long war which would break their will to help South Vietnam. Ho Chi Minh said,

“We don’t need to win military victories, we only need to hit them until they give up and get out.”

Q: Was the American antiwar movement important to Hanoi’s victory?

A: It was essential to our strategy. Support of the war from our rear was completely secure while the American rear was vulnerable. Every day our leadership would listen to world news over the radio at 9 a.m. to follow the growth of the American antiwar movement. Visits to Hanoi by people like Jane Fonda, and former Attorney General Ramsey Clark and ministers gave us confidence that we should hold on in the face of battlefield reverses. We were elated when Jane Fonda, wearing a red Vietnamese dress, said at a press conference that she was ashamed of American actions in the war and that she would struggle along with us.

Q: Did the Politburo pay attention to these visits?

A: Keenly.

Q: Why?

A: Those people represented the conscience of America. The conscience of America was part of its war-making capability, and we were turning that power in our favor. America lost because of its democracy; through dissent and protest it lost the ability to mobilize a will to win.

Q: How could the Americans have won the war?

A: Cut the Ho Chi Minh trail inside Laos. If Johnson had granted [Gen. William] Westmoreland’s requests to enter Laos and block the Ho Chi Minh trail, Hanoi could not have won the war.

(snip)

Q: What was the purpose of the 1968 Tet Offensive?

A: To relieve the pressure Gen. Westmoreland was putting on us in late 1966 and 1967 and to weaken American resolve during a presidential election year.

Q: What about Gen. Westmoreland’s strategy and tactics caused you concern?

A: (snip) Tet was designed to influence American public opinion. We would attack poorly defended parts of South Vietnam cities during a holiday and a truce when few South Vietnamese troops would be on duty. Before the main attack, we would entice American units to advance close to the borders, away from the cities. By attacking all South Vietnam’s major cities, we would spread out our forces and neutralize the impact of American firepower. Attacking on a broad front, we would lose some battles but win others. We used local forces nearby each target to frustrate discovery of our plans. Small teams, like the one which attacked the U.S. Embassy in Saigon, would be sufficient. It was a guerrilla strategy of hit-and-run raids.

Q: What about the results?

A: Our losses were staggering and a complete surprise;. Giap later told me that Tet had been a military defeat, though we had gained the planned political advantages when Johnson agreed to negotiate and did not run for re-election.


28 posted on 07/17/2009 8:08:52 PM PDT by SirJohnBarleycorn
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To: Sioux-san

The first stealth-liberal is gone.


29 posted on 07/17/2009 8:08:58 PM PDT by Republic of Texas (Socialism Always Fails)
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To: Sioux-san
Walter Cronkite on the Tet Offensive "Report from Vietnam," Walter Cronkite Broadcast, February 27, 1968.
Tonight, back in more familiar surroundings in New York, we'd like to sum up our findings in Vietnam, an analysis that must be speculative, personal, subjective. Who won and who lost in the great Tet offensive against the cities? I'm not sure. The Vietcong did not win by a knockout, but neither did we. The referees of history may make it a draw. Another standoff may be coming in the big battles expected south of the Demilitarized Zone. Khesanh could well fall, with a terrible loss in American lives, prestige and morale, and this is a tragedy of our stubbornness there; but the bastion no longer is a key to the rest of the northern regions, and it is doubtful that the American forces can be defeated across the breadth of the DMZ with any substantial loss of ground. Another standoff. On the political front, past performance gives no confidence that the Vietnamese government can cope with its problems, now compounded by the attack on the cities. It may not fall, it may hold on, but it probably won't show the dynamic qualities demanded of this young nation. Another standoff.

We have been too often disappointed by the optimism of the American leaders, both in Vietnam and Washington, to have faith any longer in the silver linings they find in the darkest clouds. They may be right, that Hanoi's winter-spring offensive has been forced by the Communist realization that they could not win the longer war of attrition, and that the Communists hope that any success in the offensive will improve their position for eventual negotiations. It would improve their position, and it would also require our realization, that we should have had all along, that any negotiations must be that-negotiations, not the dictation of peace terms. For it seems now more certain than ever that the bloody experience of Vietnam is to end in a stalemate. This summer's almost certain standoff will either end in real give-and-take negotiations or terrible escalation; and for every means we have to escalate, the enemy can match us, and that applies to invasion of the North, the use of nuclear weapons, or the mere commitment of one hundred, or two hundred, or three hundred thousand more American troops to the battle. And with each escalation, the world comes closer to the brink of cosmic disaster.

To say that we are closer to victory today is to believe, in the face of the evidence, the optimists who have been wrong in the past. To suggest we are on the edge of defeat is to yield to unreasonable pessimism. To say that we are mired in stalemate seems the only realistic, yet unsatisfactory, conclusion. On the off chance that military and political analysts are right, in the next few months we must test the enemy's intentions, in case this is indeed his last big gasp before negotiations. But it is increasingly clear to this reporter that the only rational way out then will be to negotiate, not as victors, but as an honorable people who lived up to their pledge to defend democracy, and did the best they could.

This is Walter Cronkite. Good night.

From user "Rasputin" at http://forums.signonsandiego.com/showthread.php?p=3659838

To turn around then and suggest "stalemate" as Cronkite did, or suggest that the U.S. public had been assured of victory and then delivered defeat is misleading to say the least. They had been delivered victory. With more to come if the war had been fought correctly and reporters like Cronkite hadn't been suggesting that victory was not victory.

What Cronkite and the lying liberal media did was a brilliant act of deception. They were "shocked, just shocked" that VC insurgents in pajamas had managed to get into the U.S. embassy compound in Saigon and shoot up the place. "Wasn't Saigon even secure?" was their rhetorical question. It was a straw-man question, because any reporter should have known long before that the Ho Chi Minh trail ended within thirty miles of Saigon. For as long as that trail was used by the enemy, it went without saying that Saigon would not be secure.


30 posted on 07/17/2009 8:12:26 PM PDT by BuckeyeTexan (Integrity, Character, Leadership, and Loyalty matter - Be an example, no matter the cost.)
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To: achilles2000

As a veteran of the Vietnam War from August of 1969 to January of 1971, serving as an infantry squad leader in a mechanized infantry company, and with another unit as a tank commander on an M48A3 tank; I am keenly interested in the distortions, lies, and half truths perpetuated about the Vietnam war by many of those who helped to undermine the US effort there. Much of the conventional understanding of the US involvement in the South East Asian conflict indicates a general disapproval of the United States war effort, and an acceptance of the oft regurgitated leftist conventional wisdom as to it’s historical course and outcome. That is painting the American war effort in Vietnam as misguided at best and an imperialistic effort to establish SE Asian capitalistic hegemony at worst. The antiwar left is portrayed as being noble and idealistic rather than populated by a hard core that actively hoped and worked for a US defeat, the US government as destructive of basic civil liberties in its attempt to monitor their activities, and the North Vietnamese and Vietcong as nationalists who wished to preserve their unique culture against an imperialistic onslaught. The South Vietnamese government’s struggle to survive a ruthless Communist assault while engaging in an unwarranted assault on human rights .while ignoring the numerous genocidal atrocities of the Vietcong (VC) and North Vietnamese Army (NVA) is also part of this narrative. The deceptive reporting of the Tet Offensive, exemplified by the distortive omissions of Walter Cronkite and which was the Communist’s worse defeat among numberless hundreds of others was probably the most grievous deceit perpetuated by the Press.

The reason that the United States opposed nationwide elections that were to be held in accordance with the 1954 Geneva accords was due to the murder and intimidation campaigns carried out by Ho Chi Minh. This fact is in Professor R. J. Runnel’s book Death by Government, in which he cites a low estimate of 15,000 and a high figure of 500,000 people in the “murder by quota” campaign directed by the North Vietnamese Communist Party Politburo that would have made the election a corrupt mockery. This campaign stipulated that 5% of the people living in each village and hamlet had to be liquidated, preferably those identified as members of the “ruling class.” All told says Runnel, between 1953 and 1956 it is likely that the Communists killed 195,000 to 865,000 North Vietnamese. These were non combatant men, women, and children, and hardly represent evidence of the moral high ground claimed by many in the antiwar movement. In 1956, high Communist official Nguyen Manh Tuong admitted that “while destroying the landowning class, we condemned numberless old people and children to a horrible death.” The same genocidal pattern became the Communists’ standard operating procedure in the South too. This was unequivocally demonstrated by the Hue Massacre, which the press did a great deal to downplay in its reporting of the Tet Offensive of 1968.

The National Liberation Front was the creation of the North Vietnamese Third Party Congress of September 1960, completely directed from North Vietnam. The Tet Offensive of 1968 was a disastrous military defeat for the North Vietnamese and that the VC were almost wiped out by the fighting, and that it took the NVA until 1971 to reestablish a presence using North Vietnamese troops as local guerrillas. The North Vietnam military senior commanders repeatedly said that they counted on the U.S. antiwar movement to give them the confidence to persevere in the face of their staggering battlefield personnel losses and defeats. The antiwar movement prevented the feckless President Lyndon Johnson from granting General Westmoreland’s request to enter Laos and cut the Ho Chi Minh Trail or end his policies of publicly announced gradualist escalation. The North Vietnamese knew cutting this trail would severely damage their ability to prosecute the war. Since the North Vietnamese could continue to use the Ho Chi Minh Trail lifeline, the war was needlessly prolonged for the U.S. and contributed significantly to the collapse of South Vietnam. The casualties sustained by the NVA and VC were horrendous, (1.5 million dead) and accorded well with Gen. Ngyuen Giap’s publicly professed disdain for the lives of individuals sacrificed for the greater cause of Communist victory. They were as thoroughly beaten as a military force can be given the absence of an invasion and occupation of their nation. The Soviets and Chinese recognized this, and they put pressure on their North Vietnamese allies to accept this reality and settle up at the Paris peace talks. Hanoi’s party newspaper Nhan Dan angrily denounced the Chinese and Soviets for “throwing a life bouy to a drowning pirate” and for being “mired on the dark and muddy road of unprincipled compromise.” The North Viets intransigent attitude toward negotiation was reversed after their air defenses were badly shattered in the wake of the devastating B-52 Linebacker II assault on North Vietnam, after which they were totally defenseless against American air attack.

To this day the anti-war movement as a whole refuses to acknowledge its part in the deaths of millions in Laos and Cambodia and in the subsequent exodus from South East Asia as people fled Communism, nor the imprisonment of thousands in Communist re-education camps and gulags.

South Vietnam was NOT defeated by a local popular insurgency. The final victorious North Vietnamese offensive was a multidivisional, combined arms effort lavishly equipped with Soviet and Chinese supplied tanks, self-propelled artillery, and aircraft. It was the type of blitzkrieg that Panzer General Heinz Guederian would have easily recognized. I didn’t recall seeing any barefoot, pajama-clad guerrillas jumping out of those tanks in the newsreel footage that showed them crashing through the gates of the presidential palace in Saigon. This spectacle was prompted by the pusillanimous withdrawal of Congressional support for the South Vietnamese government in the wake of the Watergate scandal, which particularly undermined this aspect of President Nixon’s foreign policy. It should be noted that a similar Communist offensive in the spring of 1972 was smashed, largely by US air power; with relatively few US ground troops in place. At the Paris Accords in 1973, the Soviet Union had agreed to reduce aid in offensive arms to North Vietnam in exchange for trade concessions from the US, effectively ending North Vietnams hopes for a military victory in the south. With the return of cold war hostilities in the wake of the Yom Kippur war after Congress revoked the Soviet’s MFN trading status, the Reds poured money and offensive military equipment into North Vietnam. South Vietnam would still be a viable nation today were it not for this nation’s refusal to live up to it’s treaty obligations to the South Vietnamese, most important to reintervene should they invade South Vietnam.

There is one primary similarity to Vietnam. A seditious near traitorous core of anti-war protesters is trying to undermine U.S. efforts there with half-truths, lies, and distortions. In that respect, the war in Iraq and the war in Vietnam are very similar. A significant difference is that thus far the current anti-war movement has not succeeded in manifesting contempt for the American military on the part of the general U.S. public as it did in the Vietnam era.

When I was in Vietnam, I recall many discussions with my fellow soldiers about the course of the war in Vietnam and their feelings about it. Many, if not most felt that “We Gotta Get Outta this Place,” to cite a popular song of the time by Eric Burden and the Animals, but for the most part they felt we should do it by fighting the war in a manner calculated to win it. I do not recall anyone ever saying that they felt the North Vietnamese could possibly defeat us on the battlefield, but to a man they were mystified by the U.S. Government’s refusal to fight in a manner that would assure military victory. Even though there was much resentment for the antiwar movement, and some (resentment) toward career professional soldiers, I never saw anyone who did not do his basic duty and many did FAR MORE THAN THAT as a soldier. Nineteen of my friends have their names on the Vietnam War Memorial Wall in Washington DC. They deserve to have the full truth told about the effort for which they gave their young lives. The U.S. public is not well served by half-truths and lies by omission about such a significant period in our history, particularly with their relevance toward our present fight in Iraq and Afghanistan.


31 posted on 07/17/2009 8:13:18 PM PDT by DMZFrank
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Comment #32 Removed by Moderator

To: AceMineral

I remember how infuriated my Dad was with Cronkite and he refused to watch him because of his anti-American remarks and showing our troops on a nightly basis getting creamed. We thought we were losing the war, but that wasn’t true we know now. There was no talk radio or internet to sort out the truth and challenge the liars on TV and in the print media. President Johnson just gave up after he heard Cronkite portray the Tet offensive as a defeat for America - “If we’ve lost Cronkite, we’ve lost the people.” Why didn’t Johnson come out and tell the truth? He probably felt a lot like BushII.


33 posted on 07/17/2009 8:13:27 PM PDT by Sioux-san
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To: Sioux-san

34 posted on 07/17/2009 8:13:38 PM PDT by IncPen (Cap and trade? Now you know why Enron had to die.)
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To: Sioux-san
Cronkite enjoyed a long and glamorous life unlike many of our late teen and 20- something American troops against whom he editorialized on a nightly basis.

One could eulogize Walter Cronkite and follow a time honoured traditon. One thinks of pure enconomics and the reality facing service men- and women, on returning to civilian life. Then facing whatever medical problems that might come their way. One might be excused for taking another track in dealing with Walter. He had it all. Whatever his country could give him, he enjoyed,right to the last.

Old fashioned it may be, but I have always felt that if one's countrymen, were involved in a war, then all rules then changed. If one felt that war was wrong, then keep one's mouth shut. Go behind closed doors with like minded friends and cry- with stiff drinks.

If one did this and the war was wrong, then one could then sit back and let the others explain. If the war was right and one was a damned fool, having said or done nothing to detract from it, means that one is then not guilty. Not publically anyway.

Walter and his ilk helped kill brave men. The enemy are not fools that they did not observe what was going on Stateside.

35 posted on 07/17/2009 8:13:59 PM PDT by Peter Libra
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To: ak267

Hopefully his crony, Andy Rooney.


36 posted on 07/17/2009 8:14:06 PM PDT by MrEdd (Heck? Geewhiz Cripes, thats the place where people who don't believe in Gosh think they aint going.)
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To: All

Don’t forget ... the KOS Kiddies, Huffies, and DUmmies are reading and scanning for hateful, racist comments.

Maybe they’ll learn something about Cronkite on this thread, but probably not.


37 posted on 07/17/2009 8:15:50 PM PDT by BuckeyeTexan (Integrity, Character, Leadership, and Loyalty matter - Be an example, no matter the cost.)
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To: Sioux-san
Walter Cronkite Defeated America on TV.

Debbie tells like it is.

Horse hockeys. That's just a Conservative rant not based on reality

Cronkite simply reported the reality in SEA of what the Johnson left-wing lackeys had created in DC.

Did the reality fit his view, yes. Was it a reality created by others, hell yes.

Johnson's "If I have lost Walter Cronkite, I've lost America" was BS. It was simply Johnson's attempt to shift the blame and excuse his decision to employ policies that would not allow our victory in RVN.

38 posted on 07/17/2009 8:17:56 PM PDT by MindBender26 ("Ok, so I screwed up... again. I'm 65. What are they going to do, send me back to Vietnam again?)
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To: Bender2

Poor Walter. Another tragic victim struck down by Second Hand Smoke at the young age of 92.

That’s what happens when you are forced to work around newspeople chain smoking for 50 years.

If libs were in charge back then and instituted their smoker bans he would have lived to at least 94 drooling on himself in a nursing home.


39 posted on 07/17/2009 8:19:01 PM PDT by Eric Blair 2084 (Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms shouldn't be a federal agency...it should be a convenience store.)
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To: Perdogg

I agree with you about Schlussel’s harsh opinion of Palin, particularly it being Palin’s fault that Bristol got pregnant and she should have kicked her out of the house if she were a true conservative moral person. I responded to her blog about that one, and she slammed me good.


40 posted on 07/17/2009 8:20:00 PM PDT by Sioux-san
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To: Sioux-san

Poor Walter. Went and ruined the fun of sending somebody else’s kid to die in Vietnam.


41 posted on 07/17/2009 8:22:51 PM PDT by Wolfie
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To: MindBender26

I think JOhnson was right - Cronkite could influence America to turn against the war effort. Do I think Johnson fought that war to win? No way.


42 posted on 07/17/2009 8:24:19 PM PDT by Sioux-san
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To: Sioux-san

http://s399.photobucket.com/albums/pp77/coiledspring/?action=view&current=bucket.flv


43 posted on 07/17/2009 8:24:59 PM PDT by Para-Ord.45
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To: Sioux-san

I remember his treason; I hope others do too.


44 posted on 07/17/2009 8:25:54 PM PDT by stillwater
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To: JCG

Debbie does it RIGHT!


45 posted on 07/17/2009 8:26:43 PM PDT by itsLUCKY2B (?Borders, Language, and Culture.?)
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To: Sioux-san
She expressed my feelings exactly for that anti-American socialist bastard. I was there during TET '68 and my family were wrecks worrying for my well being because of his reporting.

They were amazed to hear from me of the super ass kicking we gave Charlie. (was going to use a more colorful term, but thought better of it) Too many Americans to this day don't really know how bad we hurt them.

Nam Vet

46 posted on 07/17/2009 8:27:26 PM PDT by Nam Vet ("Any fool can make a rule, and any fool will mind it." .... Henry David Thoreau)
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To: screenombre

With no disrespect intended:

We got our POWS back and we left. Nixon backed out of his promise of money to NVN, so they kept the remaining POWs.


47 posted on 07/17/2009 8:27:48 PM PDT by Rannug
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To: Bigun
I'm married to one of those vet's and he agrees with you. they will line up to water that Flora.
48 posted on 07/17/2009 8:28:42 PM PDT by Milly (An Aggie Grama .)
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To: screenombre

With no disrespect intended:

We got our POWS back and we left. Nixon backed out of his promise of money to NVN, so they kept the remaining POWs.


49 posted on 07/17/2009 8:29:07 PM PDT by Rannug
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To: DMZFrank

Thank you for providing the detail regarding what I merely sketched.

My wife had relatives on both sides of that war, and Cronkite and the entire anti-war left is directly responsible for prolonging the bloodshed and for the ultimate destruction of a country that was becoming another Asian Tiger - not that they care.


50 posted on 07/17/2009 8:29:59 PM PDT by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
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