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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
You call on Fujimori to behave like the leader of a liberal democracy when Peru and other South American countries (except Argentina) are third world countries with huge poor, isolated populations that are totally ignorant. He existed in the middle of a Moaist swamp that was closing in and using the people's ignorance and superstitions against him.

The chief of his secret police had to do things (like wearing hoods) to protect the identities of his men so they and their families wouldn't be murdered in their sleep. The re-emergence of the Shining Path will test whether Fujimori and his tactics were justified. My guess is, at some point, the people will rise up and demand he take back the reins of the country.

8 posted on 08/05/2009 11:57:16 AM PDT by Deb (Beat him, strip him and bring him to my tent!)
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To: Deb

I do not argue that his efforts in those directions were wrong, nor that they were unsuccessful. But where he was neglectful was what caused his downfall. The same can be said of both Porfirio Diaz in Mexico and the Shah of Iran. Strong leaders who did much for their nations, but were deposed because of their flaws.

I cited that Fujimori was correct in deposing the corrupt and unpopular judiciary. But that was only half of that problem. He was neglectful in replacing them in such a way as to make them both a stronger institution and appreciative of his efforts. Had he done so, a strong and healthy judiciary would not later have tried and condemned him.

And the same applies to the Peruvian government. Though it was a serious scandal when his chief of secret police was caught blackmailing leaders, had Fujimori properly reordered the parliament, it would not have caused the downfall of his regime.

Likewise, though Fujimori had lieutenants, he should have created an organization that reflected his intentions. This is a common enough failing of strong and effective leaders, who never plan for a succession, and end up with a weak or ineffective replacement, who ruin much of what they have achieved.

Instead, when Fujimori left office, under whatever circumstances, things should have continued as if he was still there. The organization maintaining continuity of his leadership and ideas. Had he done so, his nation would still have the benefits he created.


11 posted on 08/05/2009 1:33:15 PM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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