Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Oddball 101: The 11 Wackiest College Courses of Fall 2009 - Queer Mobilities
Foc News ^ | 9/3/09 | AP

Posted on 09/03/2009 11:22:25 AM PDT by nmh

Want to try out this new course at Oberlin College? For a hefty $4,950 you'll get to examine why "only citizens ... 'get' to claim queerness, whereas undocumented immigrants are always presumed to be heteronormative."

In other words, you'll study why people "always" assume that illegal immigrants are straight.

...

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government
KEYWORDS: college; education; homsexuality; illegal
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051 next last
Dean of Oberlin College states:

"From my understanding, this is a class that is teaching students to critically engage in topics of identity around sexuality, nationality, disability ... [issues] that are not only part of the larger public discourse, but that people are engaged in on many college campuses and within the broader society as well."

Don't forget to check out the slide show of these freaks we are elevating! Eleven imgages that clearly spell out this agenda.

Anything but solid knowledge is emphasized.

1 posted on 09/03/2009 11:22:26 AM PDT by nmh
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: nmh

One of ths “slides”:

FemSex

No — it’s not a pornography site, but rather an independent study course at Carleton College that stands for “Female Sexuality.” The Carleton Gender and Sexuality department bills it on their Web site as “The class ... you’ve been waiting to take!”

Assigned homework readings range from “I’m not fat, I’m Latina” and “Myth of the black butt” to “How to have energy orgasms” and plenty of other titles that we can’t print here.

Eric Sieger, Director of Media & Public Relations at Carleton, said the class, which requires an instructor’s approval, is relatively new — and with an annual tuition of $40,000, FemSex costs about $4,500 to take.

“The course is basically a study in the history and culture of the female sexuality perspective,” Sieger said.


2 posted on 09/03/2009 11:23:51 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: All

Another educational glimpse of a dumbed down course
(slide show):

Video Game Studies

If you need a break from math at MIT, “Introduction to Videogame Studies” might appeal to you.

“Students play and analyze videogames while reading current research and theory,” reads the course description, which says students are expected to beat the games too, “in consultation with the instructor.”

Annual tuition at MIT is almost $40,000, which works out to around $4,500 per class.

Source: AP/Electronic Arts


3 posted on 09/03/2009 11:25:22 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

NO wonder the college graduates can’t get jobs.

What a waste!


4 posted on 09/03/2009 11:25:32 AM PDT by BenLurkin
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh
"“Myth of the black butt”"

Anybody asked Michele for her opinion on this?

5 posted on 09/03/2009 11:26:18 AM PDT by Paladin2 (Big Ears + Big Spending --> BigEarMarx, the man behind TOTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: All

Another slide:

(Keep in mind these are college courses for CREDIT!)

Tree Climbing

At Cornell University, you can fulfill your physical education requirement by taking tree climbing for $700.

“Students are excited,” said Professor Mark Holton, who teaches the class. “We have never offered a tree climbing class that has not filled to capacity. We learn how to climb into large trees — ones where you cannot reach the first branch. We also teach how to move around, go from tree to tree, and come back down safely using ropes and harnesses and various kinds of tree climbing tools.

Holton said Cornell requires physical education, and many students prefer his tree-climbing course to alternatives including bowling or skeet shooting.

“The highlight of our local class is an overnight in the trees,” he said. “We also go to Costa Rica for climbing in the jungle.”


6 posted on 09/03/2009 11:26:35 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paladin2

Or anybody asked Eric Holder?


7 posted on 09/03/2009 11:26:42 AM PDT by Paladin2 (Big Ears + Big Spending --> BigEarMarx, the man behind TOTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: nmh

They’re all nuts.

I’m taking a U Phoenix Business Management course and I think thats iffy... gee compared to that crap my course is solid science.


8 posted on 09/03/2009 11:26:42 AM PDT by GeronL (http://libertyfic.proboards.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

What ? No Sports Officiating 1 & 2 ?


9 posted on 09/03/2009 11:27:11 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: nmh

Lookie here — The College that Obama attended has a course called Stupidity.


You might be stupid yourself to dish out nearly $5,000 for this oldie but goodie that has been taught a Los Angeles’ Occidental College for years. The course description is hard to beat, saying stupidity “makes itself felt in political life ranging from the presidency to Beavis and Butthead.”

“Stupidity is neither ignorance nor organicity,” the description reads — and if you can understand that, you probably won’t end up being dissected in the course.

It costs $39,000 a year to attend Occidental, or about $4,875 per class.


10 posted on 09/03/2009 11:27:56 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

Lets try to get a job....

“I studied black butts and fem sex”... “why you shut the door , fo?”


11 posted on 09/03/2009 11:28:05 AM PDT by GeronL (http://libertyfic.proboards.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: All

How about a course on STUPIDITY?

Yup, we have one for you!

Stupidity

You might be stupid yourself to dish out nearly $5,000 for this oldie but goodie that has been taught a Los Angeles’ Occidental College for years. The course description is hard to beat, saying stupidity “makes itself felt in political life ranging from the presidency to Beavis and Butthead.”

“Stupidity is neither ignorance nor organicity,” the description reads — and if you can understand that, you probably won’t end up being dissected in the course.

It costs $39,000 a year to attend Occidental, or about $4,875 per class.


12 posted on 09/03/2009 11:28:07 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh
"in the jungle"

How un-PC, everybody knows there are no Jungles, only Rain Forests. And Rain Forest Bunnies.

13 posted on 09/03/2009 11:28:38 AM PDT by Paladin2 (Big Ears + Big Spending --> BigEarMarx, the man behind TOTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: All

If you have a burning passion for Zombie, then this is the course for you!

Zombies!

“What is it about the idea of a zombie that is so deeply unsettling,” asks a $638.25 course on offer in the English department at Ole Miss.

In the class, “The Living and the Un-Dead,” students will watch zombie films, read zombie books and write a zombie research paper — which could leave zonked out college kids pulling all-nighters feeling pretty sympathetic to the living dead.


14 posted on 09/03/2009 11:29:02 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh
BS begins here-----critically engage in topics of identity around sexuality, nationality, disability ... [issues] that are not only part of the larger public discourse, but that people are engaged in on many college campuses and within the broader society as well."----end of BS.

Close these courses, expell any student who signed up for them, and increase the math and science faculty.

15 posted on 09/03/2009 11:30:13 AM PDT by nufsed (Release the birth certificate, passport, and school records.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-chat/2331396/posts


16 posted on 09/03/2009 11:31:21 AM PDT by Steelfish
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh
<sarcasm>
I sure Charles Martin Hall would be very pleased!
</sarcasm>
17 posted on 09/03/2009 11:31:51 AM PDT by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

Of course, at MIT “Video Game Studies” might actually be a useful course for computer science type students who plan to create video games...


18 posted on 09/03/2009 11:31:54 AM PDT by JenB
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

The College that Obama attended has a course called Stupidity.


You might be stupid yourself to dish out nearly $5,000 for this oldie but goodie that has been taught a Los Angeles’ Occidental College for years. The course description is hard to beat, saying stupidity “makes itself felt in political life ranging from the presidency to Beavis and Butthead.”

“Stupidity is neither ignorance nor organicity,” the description reads — and if you can understand that, you probably won’t end up being dissected in the course.

It costs $39,000 a year to attend Occidental, or about $4,875 per class.


Maybe that is part of Obama’s deep rooted problem?

BTY, here is the actual coourse description from Occidental College:

Critical Theory and Social Justice

Professor Maeda, Chair
Professors Chin, Griffin; Associate Professor Tobin; Assistant Professor Lukes

Critical Theory – Social Justice (CTSJ) is fundamentally interdisciplinary, drawing on ideas from across traditional academic disciplines. “Critical” refers to various bodies of theory and method—Marxism, psychoanalysis, the Frankfurt School, deconstruction, critical race studies, queer theory, feminist theory, postcolonial theory, and intersectionality—that interrogate the essentialist assumptions that underlie social identities. “Social justice” refers to an extrajuridical concept of fairness that is focused on exposing and ending social inequalities. The aim of the Critical Theory – Social Justice department is to promote understanding of how categories such as “race”, “sexual orientation,” and “nationality” help people recognize and combat some injustices and hinder them from recognizing and combating others.

The department’s course offerings are divided into three levels:

100-level classes teach students how to think critically about a wide range of topics, including race, gender, sexuality, and nationality.

200-level classes teach students how to participate in a seminar, including how to contribute to class discussion and how to research and write a scholarly paper.

300-level classes teach students a major body of critical theory or a research methodology.

MAJOR: The major in Critical Theory – Social Justice requires ten classes (40 units) selected in consultation with the student’s departmental advisor and including at least one at the 100 level, one at the 200 level, two at the 300 level, and the Senior Seminar (CTSJ 490). At least four of the units must be in experiential learning.

...

http://departments.oxy.edu/registrar/catalog/ctsj.html

Yes, the theme is RADICAL .... drum roll ....

SOCIAL JUSTICE!


19 posted on 09/03/2009 11:32:21 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: nmh

$638 worth of Zombie DVDs.


20 posted on 09/03/2009 11:32:24 AM PDT by nufsed (Release the birth certificate, passport, and school records.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: nmh

“heteronormative”.

Man somebody is going to eventually get his peepee wacked using a term that I am sure is considered a slur in the gay population.


21 posted on 09/03/2009 11:32:33 AM PDT by Cyman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

This is Maddening—whatever happened to good old fashioned useful courses like basketweaving?


22 posted on 09/03/2009 11:33:16 AM PDT by eleni121 (The New Byzantium - resurrect it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: BenLurkin

Oh, they’ll get jobs - with orgnaizations like ACORN!


23 posted on 09/03/2009 11:33:23 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: nmh
200-level classes teach students how to participate in a seminar, including how to contribute to class discussion and how to research and write a scholarly paper.

Can we challenge the final in this one?

24 posted on 09/03/2009 11:33:56 AM PDT by nufsed (Release the birth certificate, passport, and school records.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: nmh

I would have signed up for tree climbing if my college had offered it!

Of all the classes offered, this one sounds about the best.


25 posted on 09/03/2009 11:35:08 AM PDT by Alas Babylon!
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Paladin2
Yes, your kids will be able to climb trees in a jungle faster than monkeys. What an accomplishment that will be. I would imagine companies will be excited about that distinction.

I find it quite primitive.

26 posted on 09/03/2009 11:35:26 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: nmh
Radical Thought from Karl Marx to George Bush

So...they're starting from the present and going back in time I see.

27 posted on 09/03/2009 11:36:22 AM PDT by PBRSTREETGANG
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: GeronL

Don’t forget the course on “Stupidity”!


28 posted on 09/03/2009 11:36:22 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: nmh

Actually, tree climbing seems like the one appropriate course in this list. It is good physical exercise, just like any other good PE course.


29 posted on 09/03/2009 11:37:41 AM PDT by Maceman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Steelfish

Sorry .... I did a search on “queer” and it didn’t come up.

This is over the top!


30 posted on 09/03/2009 11:37:49 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: nmh

there are many physicists who have been lured to the dark side of assisting proggers create realistic interactive gaming environments. i’ve heard it pays well, but id, raven, and activision never returns my calls. :(


31 posted on 09/03/2009 11:38:08 AM PDT by robomatik
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: nmh
"Video Game Studies

If you need a break from math at MIT, “Introduction to Videogame Studies” might appeal to you.

“Students play and analyze videogames while reading current research and theory,” reads the course description, which says students are expected to beat the games too, “in consultation with the instructor.”

Annual tuition at MIT is almost $40,000, which works out to around $4,500 per class."

I'll go out on a limb and suggest that "Videogame Studies" is a more useful and potentially job winning course for a typical MIT Computer Sciences grad than practically anything is for an Oberlin College Gender Studies grad. I'll betcha a cyber-nickel the one driving the BMW in 10 years is the MIT grad.

32 posted on 09/03/2009 11:38:50 AM PDT by Sooth2222 ("Suppose you were an idiot. And suppose you were a member of congress. But I repeat myself." M.Twain)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Maceman

I can see soccer, football, tennis, golf ... but “tree climbing” is not exactly scholarship material or a common “sport” in civilized countries. I think we can do better than “tree climbing” for a Phys. Ed. class, don’t you?


33 posted on 09/03/2009 11:39:44 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: nmh
Video Game Studies

If you need a break from math at MIT, “Introduction to Videogame Studies” might appeal to you.

“Students play and analyze videogames while reading current research and theory,” reads the course description, which says students are expected to beat the games too, “in consultation with the instructor.”

Annual tuition at MIT is almost $40,000, which works out to around $4,500 per class.

$4500 for a college course in video games? I should already have a doctorate in the subject, then!

34 posted on 09/03/2009 11:40:31 AM PDT by Alex Murphy (One man, alone! Betrayed by the country he loves, now its last hope in their final hour of need!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: nmh
Any bets that they'll be changing the course description of Occidental's "Stupidity" course? It reads in part:
...stupidity "makes itself felt in political life ranging from the presidency to Beavis and Butthead."
Now that The OneTM has ascended to the presidency, that description could be deemed racist.
35 posted on 09/03/2009 11:40:33 AM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

a stupid course that is


36 posted on 09/03/2009 11:41:16 AM PDT by GeronL (http://libertyfic.proboards.com)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: nmh

BUMP


37 posted on 09/03/2009 11:42:36 AM PDT by MissouriConservative (Let the purging of the RINOs begin in 2010. - MissouriConservative)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

The maple syrup one looked legitimate. I mean, we could always use a few people who know how to make that stuff.

Otherwise, pretty nutty.


38 posted on 09/03/2009 11:45:13 AM PDT by Our man in washington
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

At my university you can take courses called “Chocolate Science” and “Beer and Wine in Western Culture.” There are also majors in Turfgrass Science and Meat Sciences.


39 posted on 09/03/2009 11:45:16 AM PDT by G8 Diplomat (To err is human, to think is Vulcan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SeekAndFind

It gets better. Let me list the other courses at this college:

140. CRITICAL THEORIES OF SEXUALITY.

This course introduces students to critical theories concerning human sexuality. We read feminist, Marxist, psychoanalytic, structuralist, and poststructuralist theories of sexuality and discuss what makes each of these theories “critical.” Topics include the political economy of marriage, the relation between sexuality and procreation, uses of the erotic, homosociality, and the incitement to discourse. The authors we read include Engels, Freud, de Beauvoir, Lévi-Strauss, Gayle Rubin, Andrea Dworkin, Foucault, and Judith Butler. Emphasis Topic: Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


150. RACE, GENDER, CULTURE: RE-IMAGINING “JUSTICE” IN THE UNITED STATES.

This course will examine ways that race, gender, and culture shape perspectives on justice in the U.S. Rather than considering these concepts as unchanging aspects of personal identities, we will consider the complexity of intersecting social categories (race, culture, gender, sexuality, and class) that challenge assumptions about both individualism and sameness within any group. By reading works in literature, law, and theory, we will explore multiple strategies of resistance and social change that develop from analyses of these factors of social experience. While race, gender, sexuality, class and culture will be critically analyzed as categories of experience for all people, the course will pay particular attention to voices often marginalized as “other” in the context of U.S. discourses on justice. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies or Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


170. RACE AND ITS DISCONTENTS.

Engages with history, theory and cultural construction of race in the US and globally. Biological theories of race, eugenics, and institutionalized racism are interrogated, with an emphasis on varying constructions of blackness, whiteness and Latinidad in colonial and post-colonial contexts. Case studies from the US are augmented with attention to Australia, South Africa, South America, Asia and the Caribbean. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


180. STUPIDITY.

Stupidity is neither ignorance nor organicity, but rather, a corollary of knowing and an element of normalcy, the double of intelligence rather than its opposite. It is an artifact of our nature as finite beings and one of the most powerful determinants of human destiny. Stupidity is always the name of the Other, and it is the sign of the feminine. This course in Critical Psychology follows the work of Friedrich Nietzsche, Gilles Deleuze, and most recently, Avital Ronell, in a philosophical examination of those operations and technologies that we conduct in order to render ourselves uncomprehending. Stupidity, which has been evicted from the philosophical premises and dumbed down by psychometric psychology, has returned in the postmodern discourse against Nation, Self, and Truth and makes itself felt in political life ranging from the presidency to Beavis and Butthead. This course examines stupidity.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


186. INTRODUCTION TO CRITICAL THEORY.

This course introduces critical theory in the context of the problem of social justice. Introductions will be made to psychoanalytic, Marxist, Feminist, Structuralist, Deconstructive, and Postcolonial criticism. Reader-responses, New criticism, lesbian, gay, and queer criticism will also be surveyed. There will be close readings of the work of Louis Althusser, Georges Bataille, Michel Foucault, and Jacques Derrida as well as in depth readings of essays by Guy Hocquenghem, Julia Kristeva, and Trinh T. Minh-ha.


201. CRITICAL THEORY – SOCIAL JUSTICE COLLOQUIUM.

The Colloquium will engage in important topics and issues in Critical Theory-Social Justice. All CTSJ faculty will participate in order to facilitate an interdisciplinary engagement with complexities and nuances of these topics. Topics might include Whiteness-Race, Theory-Practice, and Representation-Embodiment.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


222. BODY POLITICS.

The course offers an interdisciplinary analysis of gender, power, and the body. The theoretical center of the course will be Foucault’s work on biopower, including Discipline and Punish and Foucault 2.0. Topics include: class and the body (Atwood, Bodily Harm, and Larsen, Passing); law and the female body (Wendy Williams, Mary Poovey); science and gender (Emily Martin, Thomas Laqueur); pornography (Catherine McKinnon, Laura Kipnis); race, body, and gender (Morrison, Beloved; Lauren Berlant, Judith Butler); multiculturalism and cross-race identifications (John Stahl, Imitation of Life, Wyatt, “The Hazards of ldealization”); and, Latin American perspectives on gender, torture, and memory. Prerequisite: at least sophomore standing.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


230. FUNDAMENTALS OF QUEER THEORY.

This class is designed to introduce the classical texts of Anglo-American queer theory as well as explore recent trends in the field. While situating queer theory’s 1990s academic advent in its historical context of identity politics, the emergence of the AIDS pandemic, and the U.S. “culture wars,” the course will begin by reviewing crucial antecedents in gay and lesbian studies, psychoanalysis, and the interventions of Michel Foucault. Readings will include works by Judith Butler, Eve Sedgwick, Leo Bersani, Lee Edelman, and Teresa de Lauretis. Additional readings will trace recent debates about “what is still queer in queer theory?” as critics engage ongoing questions about neoliberalism, homonormativity, and politics in the 21st century. Emphasis topic: feminist and queer studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


247. MACHOS: FORMS OF LATIN AMERICAN MANLINESS.

This course encourages students to think critically about the concept of machismo by reviewing a variety of ways of being manly throughout Latin America. Case studies include Octavio Paz’ classic essay on Mexican machismo and recent responses to Paz, sexual joking among working-class Mexican-American men in South Texas, same-sex sexual behavior in Nicaragua, transvestite prostitutes in Brazil, and sexual accusations traded among Argentine soccer fans. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies, Postcolonial Theory, or Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: LATIN AMERICA


248. JEWISHNESS, GENDERS, AND SEXUALITIES.

This course is focused on the intersection of race, gender, and sexuality in Jewish Cultural Studies. Topics include Biblical, Talmudic, and Diasporic models of masculinity and femininity; Freud’s Jewishness and its effect on psychoanalytic theories of gender and sexuality; and representations of Jewish men and women in U.S., European, and Latin American societies. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies, Postcolonial Theory, or Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


255. WOMEN OF COLOR.

This course will examine intersecting and overlapping categories of “difference” by focusing on the lives of women of color. By looking at conditions that shape race, sexuality, gender, class, and cultural differences, this class will critically examine multiple discourses surrounding feminism, anti-racism, heteronormativity, and critiques of imperialism. We will consider contexts of individual and collective work for social change. Using personal essays, stories, scholarly writings, artistic works, music, film, and other media, the course will look at sources that women of color draw from to ground themselves and their activist work. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies or Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


257. CRITICAL PRAXIS: VOICE, MEMORY, AND COMMUNITY TRANSFORMATION.

This course will employ community-based research strategies to engage students with questions of “voice;” dynamics of race, gender and class; and multiple perspectives that shape understandings of community transformation. Students in the course will work with community partners to develop and implement a research project. For the Spring 2010 course, students will work with community partners at the Nueva Maravilla Public Housing Community in East Los Angeles. Course materials will include readings on public housing, eastside Los Angeles, and the politics of cultural transformation. Students will participate in research on transformations of this public housing community and the broader community around it through interviews, community mappings, and more traditional academic research. Satisfies experiential learning requirement.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


259. TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS.

This course will examine the contexts that shape conditions of work and labor in globalized economies—and that create conditions of vulnerability to the practice of trafficking in persons. We will look at the commodification of work and the conditions created by globalization that structure work according to factors of social position, including gender, race, wealth/class status, immigration status, and transnational connections of families and communities. The course will look at trafficking in persons and contemporary forms of slavery, not simply to focus on the extremities of exploitative practices, but to examine the conditions that structure these relations. The problem of trafficking in persons will be situated within global economic structures that privilege flows of capital and commodify vulnerable persons. The course will look at the relationship of this vulnerability to histories of colonialism and other forms of economic exploitation. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies or Postcolonial Theory.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


270. CHILDREN AND CHILDHOOD.

This course looks cross-culturally at children and childhood and uses ethnographic case studies as a basis for examining the ways in which the very young participate in the social lives of their communities. The focus is on those between the ages of 5-12 and the primary topics include children’s play, socialization, learning, political action, and productive work. We will explore the lives of children in horticultural, pastoral, rural, and urban societies in Africa, Asia, Polynesia, and the contemporary United States. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies, Postcolonial Theory, or Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


273. SCHOOLING FOR CONFORMITY/LEARNING AS CULTURAL CRITIQUE.

What purposes have been served by schooling and learning in past and contemporary societies? In the United States, state models of schooling have long been connected overtly and covertly to economic imperatives. This course examines the complex relationships between schooling, economy and cultural politics through ethnographic documentations of American Schools. Schooling has been used both to support and supplant fundamental American values in the U.S. Critical examination will include attention to early 19th century activism on behalf of working class children, Native American Schools, schooling in prison, and the No Child Left Behind Act. This course requires enrollment in a CBL lab and satisfies experiential learning requirement. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


279. EMBODIED HISTORIES OF THE AFRICAN DIASPORA.

Examination of complex histories and politics of the African Diaspora via dance practices and traditions. Emphasis is upon the way race and gender have been variously expressed, exploited, hidden and revealed in these settings. Case studies include Haitian Vodou, Brazilian Capoeira, Jook and Hip Hop in the United States. The class includes a significant practical component: students need not be dancers but should be prepared to try dancing during class time. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Studies, Postcolonial Theory, or Queer Studies. Satisfies experiential learning requirement.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL • FINE ARTS


280. RASTAFARI, REGGAE, AND THE AFRICAN DIASPORA.

This course will examine Rastafari as a religio–political protest movement. We will analyze its evolution in the context of the dispersal of Africans to the Caribbean, Great Britain, and the United States. Particular attention will be paid to the West Indian intellectual tradition of C.L.R. James, Walter Rodney and Franz Fanon which contextualizes Rastafari as a resistance movement. We will chart the musicological development of Reggae, Dub Poetry, and Rap as distinctive expressions of Rasta. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Postcolonial Theory.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


286. WHITENESS.

This course seeks to engage the emergent body of scholarship designated to deconstruct whiteness. It will examine the construction of whiteness in the historic, legal, and economic contexts which have allowed it to function as an enabling condition for privilege and race-based prejudice. Particular attention will be paid to the role of religion and psychology in the construction of whiteness. Texts will include Race Traitor, Critical White Studies, The Invention of the White Race, The Abolition of Whiteness, White Trash, and Even the Rat was White. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Theory.


289. THE SELF.

The self, or subject, has become a central problem in contemporary intellectual deliberations. The notion of the human subject as a fully self-conscious, self-contained entity is now said to be “under erasure.” Radical re-conceptualization of the self is afoot, it casts aside the notion of a “true” self and opens new intellectual and psychological possibilities. The object of this course is to explore the critiques and to examine the possibilities for a new self. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ class.


295. TOPICS IN CRITICAL THEORY – SOCIAL JUSTICE.

This seminar will engage important topics and issues in Critical Theory – Social Justice. All CTSJ faculty will participate in order to facilitate an interdisciplinary engagement with complexities and nuances of these topics. Students from other CTSJ courses will be invited to participate in the construction of discourse around the topics. Topics might include Whiteness, Theory-Practice (Critical Theoiry – Social Justice), and Representation-Embodiment. Prerequisite: a 100-level CTSJ course or permission of instructor.


320. CULTURE AND COMMUNITY.

This class provides an opportunity for students who wish to continue and deepen their intellectual and community work to interact with a highly-motivated small group of students and community activists and organizations. Topics we will examine will be determined in consultation with community partners. Students will work together on a significant final project that links academic learning and community praxis and engagement Note that there is a required weekly lab session. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. Satisfies experiential learning requirement.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


335. QUEER OF COLOR CRITIQUE.

This course examines the emergent field of queer of color critique. Combining woman of color feminism with queer theory, queer of color critique analyzes intersections of race, gender, sexuality, and class through interdisciplinary methodologies. This course will engage essential background and formative essays including the texts of Kimberlé Crenshaw, Gloria Anzaldúa, and Chandra Mohanty; cultural instances of race and sexuality’s crossings in work by James Baldwin, Cheryl Dunye, and Issac Julien; and recent critical work by such contemporary theorists as Roderick Ferguson, Jasbir Puar, and José Esteban Muñoz. Prerequisite: any 100- or 200-level CTSJ course. Emphasis topic: Feminist and Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


337. QUEER LOS ANGELES.

This seminar is designed to uncover genealogies of sexuality in Los Angeles and Southern California by examining diverse archives and cultural sites. We will study histories of gays and lesbians in the film industry; connections and conflicts around local bar scenes; leftist homophile organizing and the mainstreaming of homosexual identities; the economic and social worlds of queer sex workers; and sociologies of queer demographics and architectures. Students will be encouraged to conduct primary research in archives and engage in community organizing around the city while honing skills in their chosen critical methodologies. Prerequisite: any 100- or 200-level CTSJ course. Emphasis topic: Feminist and Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


340. CRITICAL ETHNOGRAPHY.

In this course students learn how to do ethnographic research and writing by conducting exercises in participant-observation on or near campus. We review the history of the ethnographic method and its relation to anthropology and the colonial encounter. We also discuss what makes an ethnography critical and the tensions between ethnography sympathy and critical theory. Authors we read include Malinowski, Geertz, Delmos Jones, Dorinne Kondo, Renato Rosaldo, Ruth Behar, Jim Thomas, and Kamala Visweswaran. Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Postcolonial Theory.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


342. THE PHALLUS.

A survey of psychoanalytic theories of gender and sexuality. Topics include the signification of the phallus, the relation of the phallus to masculinity, femininity, genital organs and the fetish, the whiteness of the phallus, and the lesbian phallus. The authors we read include Freud, Riviere, Lacan, Irigaray, Kristeva, Grosz, Gallop, Silverman, de Laurentis, and Butler. Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Queer Studies.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


355. BOUNDARIES AND BORDERLANDS.

This course employs postcolonial theory to consider transformations of religions and cultures that occur when physical, experiential, geographic, and intellectual borders are crossed and blurred. How are cultures and “differences” named? From what locations? We consider cultural hybridities, re-mapped borders of culture and difference, postcoloniality, transnational migrations, and other postmodern conditions as sources for reconceiving identities, relationships between religions and cultures, and social transformations. Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Postcolonial theory.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


357. LAW AND EMPIRE.

This course employs interpretive tactics from critical legal theory and critical race theory in order to examine the use of law to justify and sustain U.S. colonial/imperial projects. We will look at how these projects are connected to the control of domestic populations (especially indigenous and racialized groups) and the expanding desire for territory. We will look at questions about nation, state, and sovereignty; law and hegemony; and relationships between “change” and maintenance of the same in legal discourse. The course will also investigate relationships between globalization, international legal regimes, and new forms of Empire. We will consider specific topics that raise questions about ongoing operations of and resistances to imperialism, including trafficking in persons, sovereignty and indigenous people’s rights, the legal status of territories and protectorates and the selective use of the U.S. Constitution in those locations, and issues rising from the “war on terror.” Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Theory or Postcolonial Theory.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: UNITED STATES


369. CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY LABORATORY.

The Clinical Psychology Laboratory (CPL) provides experiential opportunities for students interested in graduate study in psychology, law, and social justice. Students are given the opportunity to participate in the data analysis of clinical psychological assessments. Students will also participate in research under a Human Studies Committee approved project, with the goal for an early exposure to the field, and with the objective to yield research data for presentation or publication. In some projects, students may have limited opportunities to observe and participate in forensic psychological assessments as prescribed in the respective protocols. Prerequisite: instuctor interview and approval. Graded on a Credit/No Credit basis only. May be repeated once for credit.

2 units


371. WRITING AS PERFORMANCE.

Students are introduced to ethnographic methodology by examining several key texts that explore writing as a genre of self-making, performance and identity. Issues to be explored include the connection between the individual and culture at large; construction of the self through silence and absence; performing the other and the self as an ethnographic and writerly act; construction of others through disciplinary discourses. Through the semester we will read Foucault’s Herculine Barbin, Karen Brown’s Mama Lola, Marta Savigliano’s Angora Matta, John Miller Chernoff’s Bar Girl, and I, Rigoberta Menchú. This course is collaboratively structured; students must be self-motivated and willing to take intellectual chances to succeed. Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Theory, Postcolonial Theory, or Queer Studies. Satisfies experiential learning requirement.

CORE REQUIREMENT MET: INTERCULTURAL


372. CONSUMPTION, POWER, AND POLITICS.

A study of anthropological and sociological theories of consumption by focusing on the way the social inequalities of race and gender are embedded in consumption practices and the consumer sphere more generally. Issues to be addressed: consumer culture as a feminized sphere of cultural activity (does shopping matter?), consumption as a racially charged terrain (why they looted in South Central), the politics of consumption in the developing world (why the natives wear Adidas), consumption in contexts other than capitalism. Emphasis is on consumer culture as a complex terrain upon which deeply political struggles are created, resisted, and transformed. Case studies will be cross cultural, including shopping in West London, politics of gender and value in Melanesia, the relationship between race, gender, colonialism and toiletries in Africa. Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Critical Race Theory or Queer Studies.


380. PSYCHOANALYSIS: FREUD.

The work of Sigmund Freud continues to be of signal importance to students of literature, psychology, and feminist social theory. This course is designed to provide students with an in depth knowledge of his work as a model of intellectual courage and as a great and problematic achievement of the human imagination. The course will rely on the work of historian Peter Gay, Freud, a Life for our Time, for a well-contextualized treatment of Sigmund Freud’s life and work. There will be close readings of three of Freud’s seminal works, The Interpretation of Dreams, Three Essays on the Theory of Sexuality, and Beyond the Pleasure Principle. We will also read two case studies central to the emergent feminist critique and re-analysis of Freud’s work: Anna O. and Dora, an Analysis of a Case of Hysteria. In addition to critically evaluating his contributions to contemporary thought, this course will employ Freud as a great writer. The assignments will therefore emphasize the recognition and imitation of Freud’s skill as a writer. There will be four writing assignments from the different psychoanalytic genres: case history, dream interpretation, death-wish analysis, and an exercise in psychoanalytic theory. The course will be taught as a seminar with an emphasis on student participation. Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class. Emphasis topic: Queer Studies. Satisfies experiential learning requirement.


386. CRITICAL BLACKNESS.

Critical Race Theorists have begun to describe a “new blackness,” “critical blackness,” post-blackness,” and “unforgivable blackness.” This emergent scholarship, which describes a feminist New Black Man, also seeks to “queer blackness” and to articulate a black sexual politics that addresses a “new racism.” By calling us to examine the possibility of a black political solidarity that escapes the problems of identity politics, this scholarship provokes We Who Are Dark to imagine more complex and free identities. This course invites all of us to engage this scholarship.


387. PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORIES OF EVIL.

This course surveys, applies, and evaluates the variety of psychological theories of human evil from Psychoanalysis to the DSM–IV. Also examined are the distinct political and normative implications of psychology’s evolving status as a “moral science.” Prerequisite: a 200-level CTSJ class.


395. SPECIAL TOPICS IN CRITICAL THEORY – SOCIAL JUSTICE.

An advanced seminar in Critical Theory – Social Justice. Prerequisite: a 200-level class in CTSJ or permission of instructor. May be repeated for credit.


397. INDEPENDENT STUDY.

Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

2 or 4 units


490. SENIOR SEMINAR IN CRITICAL THEORY – SOCIAL JUSTICE.

This course is offered in conjunction with CTSJ majors’ ongoing research for the senior thesis. Seminar meetings will be devoted to discussion and critique of students’ work in progress and to close readings of a select few texts in Critical Theory – Social Justice. Prerequisite: senior CTSJ majors only.


499. HONORS PROJECT IN CRITICAL THEORY – SOCIAL JUSTICE.

Prerequisite: permission of the department.

http://departments.oxy.edu/registrar/catalog/ctsj.html


40 posted on 09/03/2009 11:46:03 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Cyman
“heteronormative”.

Man somebody is going to eventually get his peepee wacked using a term that I am sure is considered a slur in the gay population.

No, the term heteronormative is an insult that the gay "community" came up with to disparage those people who don't accept their "lifestyle". (It's used very similarly to homophobic).

41 posted on 09/03/2009 11:46:16 AM PDT by Bob
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: nmh

I actually questioned two of them.

- What’s the harm of learning to make maple syrup? It’s a trade isn’t it?

- I see no problem with MIT students taking a course on video game history, design, philosophy and knowing how to beat a game and working through good and bad design. After all I’m sure many EA and Activision designers have no idea what makes up a good game. Anything with a movie license pretty much proves my point.


42 posted on 09/03/2009 11:48:23 AM PDT by PittsburghAfterDark
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: PittsburghAfterDark
What’s the harm of learning to make maple syrup? It’s a trade isn’t it?

Nothing, but my aunt who opens a store in Mystic, CT could teach us to make maple syrup for free. She could even teach us the business while she's at it.
43 posted on 09/03/2009 11:56:57 AM PDT by SeekAndFind
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: nmh
"From my understanding, this is a class that is teaching students to critically engage in topics of identity around sexuality, nationality, disability ... [issues] that are not only part of the larger public discourse, but that people are engaged in on many college campuses and within the broader society as well."

Reminds me of junior high kids and one goof off asks incessant and inane questions to try to throw the teacher off topic (some fall for it) and get some laughs.

Want to try out this new course at Oberlin College? For a hefty $4,950 you'll get to examine why "only citizens ... 'get' to claim queerness, whereas undocumented immigrants are always presumed to be heteronormative." In other words, you'll study why people "always" assume that illegal immigrants are straight.

Gee, that's a new one, I didn't know people always assume 'only citizens are privileged to 'claim queerness'. Privileged, no less. And why do we care if people we meet know our gender preference, unless we're interested in a date? They're making a nice batch of stone soup out of this one. And now we're calling illegals 'undocumented immigrants'?

44 posted on 09/03/2009 12:01:54 PM PDT by fortunecookie (Please pray for Anna, age 7, who waits for a new kidney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: nmh

The Maple Syrup course could be useful. And the course on Stupidity is quite tongue in cheek, could be fun to watch. And, lol, to meet the right general elective, I could enjoy the Judge Judy class!


45 posted on 09/03/2009 12:06:36 PM PDT by fortunecookie (Please pray for Anna, age 7, who waits for a new kidney.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Paladin2

101 Class for the Bootyologist Degree???


46 posted on 09/03/2009 12:07:58 PM PDT by BossLady ("Obama: Who needs Astroturf When You Have Plants!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: BossLady

You have a future as a marketing genius. ;-)


47 posted on 09/03/2009 12:13:17 PM PDT by Paladin2 (Big Ears + Big Spending --> BigEarMarx, the man behind TOTUS)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Paladin2

I produced commercials so I know a decent hook...LOL! ;)


48 posted on 09/03/2009 12:18:13 PM PDT by BossLady ("Obama: Who needs Astroturf When You Have Plants!")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: nmh

How can there be a discussion of oddball college courses without even one reference to The Evergreen State College?

That place *defines* oddball.


49 posted on 09/03/2009 12:45:05 PM PDT by Ramius (Personally, I give us... one chance in three. More tea?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Ramius

“How can there be a discussion of oddball college courses without even one reference to The Evergreen State College?”

Please, comment on that one too!!!


50 posted on 09/03/2009 1:50:10 PM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 49 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson