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University Offers Credit for ‘Sustainable’ Lifestyle
Fox News ^ | 7/16/09 | Tyler Lyon

Posted on 09/05/2009 7:05:48 PM PDT by nmh

Can a lifestyle double as college credit, even a certificate?

The University of Iowa is offering a certificate in sustainability this fall, and one person has signed up so far.

But recent UI graduate Eric Holthaus has dedicated his job, apartment, and habits to being environmentally friendly.

“The idea is being aware and learning a formalized way to show a lifestyle,” said Holthaus.

He is an intern in the UI Office of Sustainability, created last December as an effort to bring green to a solidly black-and-gold campus.

On July 10, Holthaus manned a table at the information fair at freshman Orientation.

Approximately 40 students signed up, expressing interest in the new certificate. Only one person enrolled, but Holthaus said the program is valuable to students in all majors.

He passed out fliers to educate incoming students about the certificate at the table. The fliers — double-sided on quarter-sized pieces of paper — show ways students can make their dorm rooms more green, student organizations that are environmentally friendly, and ways they can find used clothes or furniture.

(Excerpt) Read more at green.foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; US: Iowa
KEYWORDS: green; indoctrination; sustainable
Wow!

Let’s strive to be a third world country!

Will trash picking be next?

Just iamgine, you could trash pick someone's old rags and make them into jeans! Or live by candle light instead of using electricity, Or raid garbage cans like animals do for dinner! Th epossibilities are endless.

I don't know how I missed this news nugget.

1 posted on 09/05/2009 7:05:49 PM PDT by nmh
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To: nmh

does not going in to debt qualify as “sustainable?” of course, that means everyone would have to drop the college courses, but they’d still get the credit, right?


2 posted on 09/05/2009 7:07:21 PM PDT by the invisib1e hand ("it can never happen here.")
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To: nmh

Honorary PhD to the student with the cojones, to drill an oil well in their back yard.


3 posted on 09/05/2009 7:07:30 PM PDT by Cringing Negativism Network (PALIN / BECK 2012.)
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To: nmh
Sorry about the typos!

Wow!

Let’s strive to be a third world country!

Will trash picking be next?

Just imagine, you could trash pick someone's old rags and make them into jeans!

Or live by candle light instead of using electricity.

Or raid garbage cans like animals do for dinner!

The possibilities are endless.


You are only limited by your imagination and motivation!

I don't know how I missed this news nugget.

4 posted on 09/05/2009 7:08:58 PM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: Cringing Negativism Network
Ditto!

But that would spoil it for Obama.

He likes to have foreign countries drill for oil here and resell it back to U.S. at higher prices. He just wants to “spread the wealth around”.

5 posted on 09/05/2009 7:10:42 PM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: nmh

What do you bet he buys bottled water. Having a truck burn hundreds of gallons of diesel to haul it to him.


6 posted on 09/05/2009 7:11:24 PM PDT by org.whodat (Vote: Chuck De Vore in 2012.)
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To: the invisib1e hand
Well, Michele, my belle, is pushing a “sustainable” garden at the WH. I hear it's “organic”.
7 posted on 09/05/2009 7:11:33 PM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: org.whodat
But of course!

he might feel guilty about the plastic and using the scarce resource of water ... but he's working on a solution to that ... I'm sure ... LOL!!!

8 posted on 09/05/2009 7:12:32 PM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: org.whodat

“What do you bet he buys bottled water.”

Bottled Water.

There’s a fraud that makes Madoff look like a piker. The United States municipal water supply is the SAFEST and PUREST drinking water on Earth. Except for emergency use, there’s little if any reason to buy the bottled stuff. Don’t be afraid of tap water!


9 posted on 09/05/2009 7:18:09 PM PDT by Frank_2001
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To: nmh

“Sustainable” has never really been rigorously modeled. These morons add what looks good to the denominator and ignore what doesn’t help from the numerator. Until they are willing to weigh all costs and all benefits I don’t want to talk to them.

What is the carbon footprint of producing a Prius battery?

What is the hazmat disposal cost of replacing a Prius battery?


10 posted on 09/05/2009 7:18:45 PM PDT by jimfree (Freep and ye shall find!)
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To: nmh

I imagine he’d bring a certain presence to all of his other classes, one that would have to be eliminated with a room freshener...


11 posted on 09/05/2009 7:19:11 PM PDT by Buck W. (The President of the United States IS named Schickelgruber...)
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To: nmh

“Plastic is so everywhere,” Holthaus said, “It can be taxing on your mental sanity.”

Hoo boy, we got ourselves a nutjob here.

The certificate in sustainability is a crock. Get a load of the courses:

http://www.registrar.uiowa.edu/registrar/catalog/universitycollege/sustainability/


12 posted on 09/05/2009 7:24:24 PM PDT by LibFreeOrDie (Obama promised a gold mine, but he will give us the shaft.)
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To: nmh

Reading the article in full, I see he has developed such ingenius solutions as installing CFLs, opening the window to get a breeze, and buying food in bulk. Quick—where’s MENSA when you need them? This guy is truly a genius!

The real news in this story is that in ultra-lib, Marx-loving Iowa City, they only got one moron to sign up for this “certificate.”


13 posted on 09/05/2009 7:26:53 PM PDT by GnL
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To: Frank_2001

I know, but all of the burlaper’s walk around with their bottled water!!


14 posted on 09/05/2009 7:27:07 PM PDT by org.whodat (Vote: Chuck De Vore in 2012.)
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To: nmh

As long as you’re not suggesting that waste is good, then I’m on board with you. People should be free to consume - as long as they pay the freight costs. As for me, I scrounge like a madman, live as cheaply as I can and am not afraid of lifting a dumpster lid to peek inside. My personal goal is to minimize dependence on the larger social order as close to zero as possible. I don’t accept green philosophy in the least but by the same token, people who thoughtlessly consume are equally deranged.


15 posted on 09/05/2009 7:28:24 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth
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To: LibFreeOrDie

This one sounds interesting: “Plants and Human Affairs”

I’ve never once had any inkling of a desire to have an affair with a plant.


16 posted on 09/05/2009 7:29:45 PM PDT by GnL
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To: nmh
The new dormitories, "Mud Hut Hall"


17 posted on 09/05/2009 7:32:17 PM PDT by Stultis (Oceania has always been at war with Eastasia; Democrats always opposed waterboarding as torture)
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To: nmh

You know what I think we should have? SUSTAINABLE DIVERSITY.

That means we sound like we like it BUT WE DON’T.


18 posted on 09/05/2009 7:34:39 PM PDT by gaijin
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To: nmh
Just WOW! In the world of ‘big’…Oil, Banks, Auto, Insurance, Health Care, and companies that are ‘too big to fail’ we have this wonderful little bit of news from a corner of our society too sacrosanct to ever criticize - - Big Education.

Hey, ‘really smart guys’ why don’t you just tap into all those multi-million and billion dollar endowments and simply lower the costs of tuition from the get-go instead of offering all these stupid communist solutions to getting credits for graduation. Oh yeah, it doesn’t fit the plan…Sorry…

19 posted on 09/05/2009 7:40:47 PM PDT by ArchAngel1983 (Arch Angel- on guard)
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To: nmh

Upon enrollment, you’ll be given one roll of TP and instructed to make it last the entire term. And it’ll be the delightful Chinese wax-paper TP with zero absorption.


20 posted on 09/05/2009 7:58:36 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: jimfree
Apparently we're running out of the Rare Earth Elements needed to make the batteries, too. So mining the elements needed to be "green" doesn't appear to be very sustainable. And the mercury used in Chinese sweat shops to make CFLs is killing workers, so that may not be very "sustainable" to them. Of course, the people are probably an inexhaustible and expendable workforce, so maybe that is "sustainable."

Shortage of Rare Earths Used in Hybrids, TVs May Loom in China.

Energy-Efficient Lightbulbs Poison Hundreds of Chinese Workers.

21 posted on 09/05/2009 8:04:43 PM PDT by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: nmh

I can still recall when people graduating with college degrees had learned usable skills.

I recently met a very nice but misdirected black guy who has a degree in something like “Professional sports recruiting” (not exactly the wording but close). He has been out of school several years, bouncing from one meaningless part time job to another while he spends his evenings eMailing resumes to sports teams, colleges, prep schools.

I told him he should join the Marines and learn a usable skill before he gets too old.


22 posted on 09/05/2009 8:23:30 PM PDT by Iron Munro ("You can't kill the beast while sucking at its teat." - Claire Wolfe)
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: nmh

I’ll bet some of the old timers here remember when a PhD thesis could be submitted and approved to show the merits of burning hippies.


24 posted on 09/05/2009 10:58:02 PM PDT by La.daddyrabbit (Born and bred in the briar patch)
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To: Stultis

Wow!

I appreciate that.

Perhaps when Obama is finished, Obama, Michele and the kiddies could live there while Obama teaches there. He’d fit in better in Africa. His policies are those of evil political terrorists.


25 posted on 09/06/2009 9:50:03 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: nmh

We’ve had sustainable majors for years in California

http://www.sarep.ucdavis.edu/concept.htm


26 posted on 09/06/2009 9:53:01 AM PDT by artichokegrower
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To: nmh

Approximately 40 students signed up, expressing interest in the new certificate. Only one person enrolled, but Holthaus said the program is valuable to students in all majors.


They discovered they could get credit for peeing in the shower.................


27 posted on 09/07/2009 9:47:56 AM PDT by PeterPrinciple ( Seeking the truth here folks.)
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To: PeterPrinciple
Yeah, some kids will sign up for this garbage and totally WASTE precious time.

LOOK at how well the U.S. is faring when compared against ALL industrialized nations in Math and Science.

http://www.4brevard.com/choice/international-test-scores.htm

28 posted on 09/07/2009 9:59:41 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: PeterPrinciple

Here’s the report. BTW, people in Costa Rica are MORE literate than students in the U.S.. Isn’t that lovely? I’m sorry about the formatting for the rankings. You’ll need to go to the url for proper formatting. It’s shcoking how LOW the U.S. is compared to other countries and each year it gets WORSE.

International Test Scores
Poor U.S. Test Results
Tied To Weak Curriculum


Most of the following was excerpted from a speech by Pascal D. Forgione, Jr., Ph.D. U.S. Commissioner of Education Statistics. As a government researcher, he tries to put the best possible spin on the academic failure of American schools, but this is no sugar-coated report.

This is no sugar-coated report

Math and science offer the only common basis for comparing American schools to the rest of the world. Other subjects vary from one country to another. Results of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) involving a half-million students in 41 countries are authoritative. Oversight groups included not only the world’s leading experts on comparative studies of education systems, but also experts in assessment design and statistical analysis.
Comparisons are Fair Traditionally, the most common criticism of international studies is that it is unfair to compare our results to other countries because their national scores are based on a highly selective population. While this may have been true in the past, it is simply not valid in the case of TIMSS. Using several different methods of measuring enrollment, the data indicate that the enrollment rate in the United States is closer to the international average than to the desirable upper extreme. Even the theory that higher secondary enrollment rates hurt a country’s overall achievement did not hold true. Students in countries with higher enrollment rates tended to score significantly higher on both the math and science general knowledge assessments. Higher secondary enrollment rates are associated with higher levels of performance, rather than the reverse. The range of scores, from high to low, is no greater in the United States than in the higher-scoring countries.

Participants This study included primarily the industrialized countries of Europe but also the United States, Canada, New Zealand and Asia. So-called third world countries that have a higher literacy rate than the U.S., like Costa Rica, and others that contribute a significant number of U.S. advance degreed immigrants, like India , were not part of this study; therefore, the results in terms of world competition are worse than portrayed in these charts.

Results In short, the tests showed U.S. fourth-graders performing poorly, middle school students worse. and high school students are unable to compete. By the same criteria used to say we were “average” in elementary school, “we appear to be “near the bottom” at the high school level. People have a tendency to think this picture is bleak but it doesn’t apply to their own school. Chances are, even if your school compares well in SAT scores, it will still be a lightweight on an international scale.

By the time our students are ready to leave high school - ready to enter higher education and the labor force - they are doing so badly with science they are significantly weaker than their peers in other countries.
Our idea of “advanced” is clearly below international standards.
There appears to be a consistent weakness in our teaching performance in physical sciences that becomes magnified over the years.
Causes for Failure One would think that with our vastly superior resources and the level of education spending which far exceeds these competitors we would outperform nearly everyone - not so. Dr. Schmidt, who oversees the research effort into the TIMSS results, says the actual cause for the failures appears to be weak math and science curricula in U.S. middle schools.

A more insightful explanation was once proffered by Jean McLaughlin, president of Barry University who said “The public schools lack focus; instead of concentrating on education, they dabble in social re-engineering”. That assessment was confirmed by the superintendent of the country’s fourth largest school district in Miami-Dade, Florida who said “Half our job is education, and the other half is social work”.

Downward sloping performance confirms John Taylor Gatto’s thesis in his book Dumbing Us Down and his speeches which charge compulsory government education with deliberately producing robots instead of adults who are the best they can be.

Curricula The biggest deficits are found at the middle school level. In middle school, most countries shift curricula from basic arithmetic and elementary science in the direction of chemistry, physics, algebra and geometry. Even poor countries generally teach a half-year of algebra and a half-year of geometry to every eighth-grader.

In U.S. middle schools, however, most students continue to review arithmetic. And they are more likely to study earth science and life science than physics or chemistry.

Teachers Among teachers of high school biology and life sciences classes, approximately 31 percent of them do not have at least a minor in biology. Among high school physical science teachers, over half, 55 percent, do not have at least a minor in any of the physical sciences. Again we might question the focus of the teachers on social re-engineering instead of subject areas.

Textbooks U.S. textbooks treat topics with a “mile-wide, inch-deep” approach, Schmidt said. A typical U.S. eighth-grade math textbook deals with about 35 topics. By comparison, a Japanese or German math textbook for that age would have only five or six topics. Comparisons done elsewhere between French and American math books show more innovative approaches to finding, for instance, the volume of a pyramid. Fractions don’t lend themselves to computerization, so they’re relegated to an importance slightly above Roman numerals. Calculators are here to stay, so kids breeze through long division. They concentrate on how to use math rather than how to do math, and with less entanglement in social philosophy.

American Education Not World Class
The schools systematically let kids down. By grade 4, American students only score in the middle of 26 countries reported. By grade 8 they are in the bottom third, and at the finish line, where it really counts, we’re near dead last. Its even worse when you notice that some of the superior countries in grade 8 (especially the Asians) were not included in published 12th grade results. They do not need 12 grades.

Math

Grade 4 Grade 8 Grade 12
Rank Nation Score Nation Score Nation Score
1. Singapore 625 Singapore 643 Netherlands 560
2. Korea 611 Korea 607 Sweden 552
3. Japan 597 Japan 605 Denmark 547
4. Hong Kong 587 Hong Kong 588 Switzerland 540
5. Netherlands 577 Belgium 565 Iceland 534
6. Czech Republic 567 Czech Republic 564 Norway 528
7. Austria 559 Slovak Republic 547 France 523
8. Slovenia 552 Switzerland 545 New Zealand 522
9. Ireland 550 Netherlands 541 Australia 522
10. Hungary 548 Slovenia 541 Canada 519
11. Australia 546 Bulgaria 540 Austria 518
12. United States 545 Austria 539 Slovenia 512
13. Canada 532 France 538 Germany 495
14. Israel 531 Hungary 537 Hungary 483
15. Latvia 525 Russian Fed. 535 Italy 476
16. Scotland 520 Australia 530 Russian Fed. 471
17. England 513 Ireland 527 Lithuania 469
18. Cyprus 502 Canada 527 Czech Republic 466
19. Norway 502 Belgium 526 United States 461
20. New Zealand 499 Sweden 519 Cyprus 446
21. Greece 492 Thailand 522 South Africa 356
22. Thailand 490 Israel 522
23. Portugal 475 Germany 509
24. Iceland 474 New Zealand 508
25. Iran 429 England 506
26. Kuwait 400 Norway 503
27. Denmark 502
28. United States 500
29. Scotland 498
30. Latvia 493
31. Spain 487
32. Iceland 487
33. Greece 484
34. Romania 482
35. Lithuania 477
36. Cyprus 474
37. Portugal 454
38. Iran 428
39. Kuwait 392
40. Colombia 385
41. South Africa 354
Grade Average 529 Grade Average 513 Grade Average 500

Science

Grade 4 Grade 8 Grade 12
Rank Nation Score Nation Score Nation Score
1. Korea 597 Singapore 607 Sweden 559
2. Japan 574 Czech Republic 574 Netherlands 558
3. United States 565 Japan 571 Iceland 549
4. Austria 565 Korea 565 Norway 544
5. Australia 562 Bulgaria 565 Canada 532
6. Netherlands 557 Netherlands 560 New Zealand 529
7. Czech Republic 557 Slovenia 560 Australia 527
8. England 551 Austria 558 Switzerland 523
9. Canada 549 Hungary 554 Austria 520
10. Singapore 547 England 552 Slovenia 517
11. Slovenia 546 Belgium 550 Denmark 509
12. Ireland 539 Australia 545 Germany 497
13. Scotland 536 Slovak Republic 544 France 487
14. Hong Kong 533 Russian Fed. 538 Czech Republic 487
15. Hungary 532 Ireland 538 Russian Fed. 481
16. New Zealand 531 Sweden 535 United States 480
17. Norway 530 United States 534 Italy 475
18. Latvia 512 Germany 531 Hungary 471
19. Israel 505 Canada 531 Lithuania 461
20. Iceland 505 Norway 527 Cyprus 448
21. Greece 497 New Zealand 525 South Africa 349
22. Portugal 480 Thailand 525
23. Cyprus 475 Israel 524
24. Thailand 473 Hong Kong 522
25. Iran 416 Switzerland 522
26. Kuwait 401 Scotland 517
15 others
Grade Average 524 Grade Average 516 Grade Average 500

For years, people have taken false comfort in the notion that while the performance of all our students may be poor, our strength lies in our top students. Many people believe that our best students perform better than the best students of most other countries. TIMSS shows this notion to be untrue. Note again that many superior countries (especially the Asians) are not included in the reported results.

Grade 12 Top Students

Advanced Math Advanced Science
Rank Nation Score Nation Score
1. France 557 Norway 581
2. Russian Fed. 542 Sweden 573
3. Switzerland 533 Russian Fed. 545
4. Australia 525 Denmark 534
5. Denmark 522 Slovenia 523
6. Cyprus 518 Germany 522
7. Lithuania 516 Australia 518
8. Greece 513 Cyprus 494
9. Sweden 512 Latvia 488
10. Canada 509 Switzerland 488
11. Slovenia 475 Greece 486
12. Italy 474 Canada 485
13. Czech Republic 469 France 466
14. Germany 465 Czech Republic 451
15. United States 442 Austria 435
16. Austria 436 United States 423
Grade Average 501 Grade Average 501

click links for more info

Comment In 1983, A Nation At Risk urgently recommended reforms in education warning “the United States is under challenge from many quarters”. Today we’re at greater risk than ever. The Government Education Monopoly continues to imperil our economy by failing miserably at preparing the workforce. Business increasingly looks for talent overseas. The world’s greatest concentration of PhD’s is in Seoul, Korea and half of Americans can’t even find Seoul on a map.

Microsoft India taps Indian programming and engineering skills with 83,000 certifications issued in 1999. We import 107,000 H-1B professionals every year, half of them with PhD’s.

Unless we re-tool education, there is a strong likelihood that America will get overtaken in education the way we did in automobiles. Before the 70’s our economy was based on the automobile, but a complacent automobile industry failed to make changes. Japanese cars invaded, and canceled our dominance. The resulting outflow of dollars to Japan devastated our economy. Its about to happen again, this time to pay high salaries to well-educated workers overseas.

Doing it Right One does not need to scurry around trying to devise a plan to extricate ourselves from this mess. The simplest way to improve American education (public, private, and parochial) quickly is to adopt books and teaching methods from countries at the top of the ranking. During ten years of he cultural revolution, South Korea adopted the U.S. System, dumping it when their results nosedived. Several International Baccalaureate schools have gotten dual accreditation from the participating sister country when they met the higher standards required abroad. In our own case, that required an extra hour of instruction each day, and phys-ed in a foreign language. One such government school nicknamed “teacher heaven” was organized by principal Lois Lindahl in Miami, Florida. Her motto is “Children will perform to the level of your expectations”.


Sources:

Download the summary TIMSS report in PDF format http://nces.ed.gov/pubs99/1999081.pdf

Full text and charts of Forgione speech: http://nces.ed.gov/Pressrelease/science/index.html

See also: http://ed-web3.educ.msu.edu/news/news-briefs/1999/curriculum.htm

Kill the messenger: Dr. Forgione’s re-nomination as U.S. Commissioner of Education Statistics was blocked by the Clinton/Gore administration. Forgione is now Superintendent of the Austin Independent School District.

More Info:

Boston College International Study Center originated TIMSS. It has timely updates and more data.

Grandfather Education Report presenting graphs, data, and analysis that tells the stark truth.


29 posted on 09/07/2009 10:03:17 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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To: ArchAngel1983

Hey, the Pacific Rim countries are eating our lunch, academically speaking. Here is a sugar coated report on Math and Science.

The TIMSS is testing put out by the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study. It includes ALL industrialized countries in the world. The U.S. is in the toilet. If Obama really gave a crap, he’d change that so kids could compete in the “global” economy. As it stands now it will be difficult for even the brightest U.S. kids to have a shot at being competitive when they graduate from high school.

Mathematics

The 2007 TIMSS results showed that U.S. students’ average mathematics score was 529 for 4th-graders and 508 for 8th-graders. Both scores were above the TIMSS scale average, which is set at 500 for every administration of TIMSS at both grades, and both were higher than the respective U.S. score in 1995.

(Look how LOW that is compared to the Pacific Rim and other European countries.)

Fourth-graders in 8 of the 35 other countries that participated in 2007 (Hong Kong, Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Japan, Kazakhstan, Russian Federation, England, and Latvia) scored above their U.S. peers, on average; and 8th-graders in 5 of the 47 other countries that participated in 2007 (Chinese Taipei, Korea, Singapore, Hong Kong, and Japan) scored above their U.S. peers, on average.

Among the 16 countries that participated in both the first TIMSS in 1995 and the most recent TIMSS in 2007, at grade 4, the average mathematics score increased in 8 countries, including in the United States, and decreased in 4 countries. Among the 20 countries that participated in both the 1995 and 2007 TIMSS at grade 8, the average mathematics score increased in 6 countries, including in the United States, and decreased in 10 countries.

In PISA 2006, U.S. 15-year-old students’ average mathematics literacy score of 474 was lower than the OECD average of 498, and placed U.S. 15-year-olds in the bottom quarter of participating OECD nations, a relative position unchanged from 2003.

Fifteen-year-old students in 23 of the 29 other participating OECD-member countries outperformed their U.S. peers. There was no measurable change in U.S. 15-year-olds’ average mathematics literacy score between 2003 and 2006, in its relationship to the OECD average, or in its relative position to the countries whose scores increased or decreased.
Science

The 2007 TIMSS results showed that U.S. students’ average science score was 539 for 4th-graders and 520 for 8th-graders. Both scores were above the TIMSS scale average, which is set at 500 for every administration of TIMSS at both grades, but neither was measurably different than the respective U.S. score in 1995.

Fourth-graders in 4 of the 35 other countries that participated in 2007 (Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong, and Japan) scored above their U.S. peers, on average; and 8th-graders in 9 of the 47 other countries that participated in 2007 (Singapore, Chinese Taipei, Japan, Korea, England, Hungary, the Czech Republic, Slovenia, and the Russian Federation) scored above their U.S. peers, on average.

While there was no measurable change in the average score of U.S. 4th-graders or 8th-graders in science between 1995 and 2007, among the other 15 countries that participated in the 1995 and 2007 TIMSS at grade 4, the average science score increased in 7 countries and decreased in 5 countries; and among the other 18 countries that participated in both the 1995 and 2007 TIMSS at grade 8, the average science score increased in 5 countries and decreased in 3 countries.

In PISA 2006, U.S. 15-year-old students’ average science literacy score of 489 was lower than the OECD average of 500, and placed U.S. 15-year-olds in the bottom third of participating OECD nations. Fifteen-year-old students in 16 of the 29 other participating OECD-member countries outperformed their U.S. peers in terms of average scores.

http://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/2009/analysis/index.asp

Bottom line is the U.S. consistley scores LOWER than other countries.


30 posted on 09/07/2009 10:16:26 AM PDT by nmh (Intelligent people recognize Intelligent Design (God).)
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