Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

U.S. Boats Delayed Because Of Many Manufacturing Defects
strategy page ^ | 09-06-09 | staff

Posted on 09/06/2009 9:41:10 AM PDT by em2vn

A manufacturing problem with the U.S. Navy's new Virginia class SSNs (nuclear attack subs) has delayed the commissioning of a new boat, the USS New Mexico. The ceremony will be delayed from November 21st, to sometime in January or February. The problem has to do with bolts that were not manufactured to specifications. These bolts hold together the track system that is used to move torpedoes and other weapons around the "weapons room". The poorly manufactured bolts will hold the tracks together under peacetime conditions. But in the stress of combat (like depth charges or violent maneuvers) they are likely to fail. The navy not only wants to get the proper bolts, but also is inspecting hundreds of other bolts in the weapons room, and perhaps other items as well. This anxiety is because the bolt situation is not the first manufacturing problem the Virginias have encountered lately.

(Excerpt) Read more at strategypage.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bolts; navair; submarines; welds
Wait until you get to the part about the welds.
1 posted on 09/06/2009 9:41:12 AM PDT by em2vn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: em2vn
Let's all sing together...

"Look for the Union label..."

2 posted on 09/06/2009 9:43:52 AM PDT by raybbr (It's going to get a lot worse now that the anchor babies are voting!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: raybbr

Who made the bolts?
Not listed in the article.
Jack


3 posted on 09/06/2009 9:48:44 AM PDT by btcusn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: em2vn

Does not say were made - is this EB’s shipyard?


4 posted on 09/06/2009 9:52:35 AM PDT by edcoil (If I had 1 cent for every dollar the government saved, Bill Gates and I would be friends.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: raybbr

More like “Look for the substandard Chinese steel...”


5 posted on 09/06/2009 9:55:26 AM PDT by MediaMole
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: em2vn
Could they perhaps be of Chinese origin? Maybe they were manufactured to “hold” during peacetime maneuvers but fail (by manufacturing design) during wartime action. Things that make you go hmmmmm.
6 posted on 09/06/2009 9:55:29 AM PDT by The FIGHTIN Illini (The betrayal of the Greatest Generation continues)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: em2vn
Actually, the new subs are the LEAST of the navy's problems.
Photobucket

Armed with a single MA-2 .50 caliber Browning, this much feared naval vessel carries up to 30 rounds of armor piercing ammunition. It is the first in an entirely new naval architecture class -- technically, “clitoral” (not to be confused with “littoral”) -- being pushed on the Pentagon by the defense minded wussies in the Obama Administration as a cost-saving measure. If you look closely, you can see the heavy-duty seat restraint which prevents the pilot/gunner – Kamakazi Kowalski – from leaping from the vessel prior to engaging the enemy. The 12 V trolling motor – which lacks a reverse function -- propels this sophisticated craft forward at a top speed of 4 knots. Reverse travel – at approximately 35 knots -- is achieved by firing the Browning.

The no-bid contract to build 200 of these fearsome warships was recently awarded to Obama-Soros-Emanuel Shipbuilding and Stormdoor Manufacturing (formerly General Dynamics) and will be administered by trusted Obama associate and Chief-of-Staff Rahm Emanuel who commented that, at $12 million each, they are a bargain. They will be constructed exclusively at the company’s facility in Kenya with major subcomponent production (rivets and miscellaneous fasteners) at the company’s Harlem and Skokie plants. Delivery is expected to begin in 2024 (or as soon as the subcontractor's funds are safely in the contractor's Swiss account).


7 posted on 09/06/2009 10:04:02 AM PDT by Dick Bachert (.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: em2vn

You can trace alot of this stuff back the Bush (41) when HE and the DoD (Cheney) allowed MASSIVE Defense Industry consolidations it allowed for MASSIVE Defense Corp to exist(Northop-Grumman, Lockheed-Martin and the like).


8 posted on 09/06/2009 10:04:36 AM PDT by US Navy Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Bachert

His reverse propulsion system is more powerful than his forward one.


9 posted on 09/06/2009 10:11:10 AM PDT by Erasmus (Barack Hussein Obama: America's toast!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: US Navy Vet; raybbr

The problem here is shoddy work...not the size of the contractor.

I agree with raybbr....look for the Union Made label.


10 posted on 09/06/2009 10:11:34 AM PDT by A.Hun (Common sense is no longer common.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: A.Hun

YEP!


11 posted on 09/06/2009 10:12:24 AM PDT by US Navy Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: em2vn
From the article:

"This is all about quality control, or, rather, that lack of same. It all began when a weld inspector at the Newport News shipyard was found to be falsifying the inspection of welding jobs on four Virginia class submarines and a Nimitz class carrier. Some 10,000 welds had to be re-inspected, as these are how many the now dismissed inspector handled in four years on the job. Each Virginia class sub has about 300,000 welds that have to be inspected. Normally, only a few will fail inspection and have to be redone."

Now as I see it, that little bastard of an 'inspector' should have been convicted of sabotage, lined up against a wall, and drilled for ventilation.
12 posted on 09/06/2009 10:15:13 AM PDT by mkjessup ("Just Say No" to the illegal 0bamunist Regime of Occupation. The 'Dear Comrade' can Kiss My Ass.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: US Navy Vet
allowed MASSIVE Defense Industry consolidations it allowed for MASSIVE Defense Corp to exist(Northop-Grumman, Lockheed-Martin and the like).
How does this translate to non-conforming material/weak bolts used on a contract that specified otherwise on prints, drawings, etc?

One case example would help your case (the prosecution should _not_ be giving hints to the defense).

13 posted on 09/06/2009 10:15:32 AM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: A.Hun

One of the newest amphib out of the yards is a piece of crap, too. In another time, producing bad weapons for the military during wartime would have grave consequences.


14 posted on 09/06/2009 10:16:55 AM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: em2vn

“It all began when a weld inspector at the Newport News shipyard was discovered involved in bribery to create false inspection reports...”


15 posted on 09/06/2009 10:17:13 AM PDT by papasmurf (RnVjayB5b3UsIDBiYW1hLCB5b3UgcGllY2Ugb2Ygc2hpdCBjb3dhcmQh)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: _Jim

Smaller Companies are easier to keep track of.


16 posted on 09/06/2009 10:18:32 AM PDT by US Navy Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: em2vn; magslinger
It all began when a weld inspector at the Newport News shipyard was found to be falsifying the inspection of welding jobs on four Virginia class submarines and a Nimitz class carrier. Some 10,000 welds had to be re-inspected,....

Treason.

17 posted on 09/06/2009 10:18:40 AM PDT by SC Swamp Fox (Aim small, miss small.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: MediaMole

Maybe Chinese. Still, each bolt, nut, et al, must pass the Navy and the Shipyard’s inspection process before being used.

Corruption, the hallmark of union workers.


18 posted on 09/06/2009 10:19:21 AM PDT by papasmurf (RnVjayB5b3UsIDBiYW1hLCB5b3UgcGllY2Ugb2Ygc2hpdCBjb3dhcmQh)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Erasmus

That, my perceptive friend, was the entire idea — and a metaphor for America under the Obozo regime: FULL SPEED ASTERN!!!


19 posted on 09/06/2009 10:20:48 AM PDT by Dick Bachert (.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: USNBandit

I don’t understand how any self respecting American, union or not, could put so many other men’s lives in jeopardy...

Our nation is sick, and I’m afraid the cure will be bitter indeed.


20 posted on 09/06/2009 10:23:13 AM PDT by A.Hun (Common sense is no longer common.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: US Navy Vet
Smaller Companies are easier to keep track of.
And this translates into contract violations how?
21 posted on 09/06/2009 10:27:51 AM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: _Jim
What is YOUR experience with DoD contractor?
22 posted on 09/06/2009 10:30:43 AM PDT by US Navy Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: US Navy Vet

Been there, done that. 18 yrs on several different ‘activities’. We never cheated either.

Yours?


23 posted on 09/06/2009 10:33:52 AM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: _Jim
I am retired US Navy with more hours in US Navy shipyard than I can count. EVERY time we pulled out to sea we spent more time UNF*CKING thing that the shipyard screwed up than testing things that they “fixed”. Senior people related to me similar stories from other shipyards. O and by they way I am a DoD contractor now.
24 posted on 09/06/2009 10:38:03 AM PDT by US Navy Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: US Navy Vet
EVERY time we pulled out to sea we spent more time UNF*CKING thing that the shipyard screwed up
Would I be right in assuming this was done by union labor? In say, the north east?
25 posted on 09/06/2009 10:40:12 AM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: A.Hun
I don’t understand how any self respecting American, union or not, could put so many other men’s lives in jeopardy...

Our nation is sick, and I’m afraid the cure will be bitter indeed.

The history books that have been used to teach our children for the last 50 years have been written by people who hate America and everything it stood for, and the history classes have been taught by people who thought that the wrong side won the cold war. For the most part, people who have been in the work force for the last 20 or 30 years have no concept of American exceptionalism, of what a wonderful and amazing thing this country is. To them, there's nothing special about America, and for far too many, America is evil and they hope for change... Which explains why 53% of the presidential voters voted the way they did.

To them, a job working for a defense contractor is just a job, nothing else. Nobody will notice. It's no big deal. BTW, this is the same attitude that was rife in the labor force of the Soviet Union.

Mark

26 posted on 09/06/2009 10:43:31 AM PDT by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: A.Hun
I don’t understand how any self respecting American, union or not, could put so many other men’s lives in jeopardy...

Our nation is sick, and I’m afraid the cure will be bitter indeed.

The history books that have been used to teach our children for the last 50 years have been written by people who hate America and everything it stood for, and the history classes have been taught by people who thought that the wrong side won the cold war. For the most part, people who have been in the work force for the last 20 or 30 years have no concept of American exceptionalism, of what a wonderful and amazing thing this country is. To them, there's nothing special about America, and for far too many, America is evil and they hope for change... Which explains why 53% of the presidential voters voted the way they did.

To them, a job working for a defense contractor is just a job, nothing else. Nobody will notice. It's no big deal. BTW, this is the same attitude that was rife in the labor force of the Soviet Union.

Mark

27 posted on 09/06/2009 10:43:40 AM PDT by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: _Jim
How does this translate to non-conforming material/weak bolts used on a contract that specified otherwise on prints, drawings, etc?

No competition. Why worry about quality when you customer has no place else to go to get their ships built? There is a single company building carriers. A single company building large surface combatants. Two companies building destroyers. Two companies building submarines. Twenty or thirty years ago there were quite a few more.

28 posted on 09/06/2009 10:44:02 AM PDT by Non-Sequitur
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Non-Sequitur
No competition.
Gee. That explains it all.

No mention of altered 'test' results, fudged QC activities, acceptance of non-conforming materials that FAILED at incoming QC, no mention of inspectors being bought off, no mention of using materials with NO trace-ability back to a legitimate vendor, just the old hand-waving saw about 'no competition'.

Great. You have it all nailed down.

29 posted on 09/06/2009 10:49:52 AM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: _Jim

The Shipyard is question(in my case) was Norfolk Naval Shipyard(Portmouth, VA). I have heard similer stories from Newport News(VA), Puget Sound Naval SY(WA) and Ingalls (MS). I have heard no stories from Bath(Maine) or Electric Boat(Gen Dyn)(CT). But I am sure that there are similer stories there too. And yes ALL of these are Union.


30 posted on 09/06/2009 10:50:23 AM PDT by US Navy Vet
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: em2vn

A friend of ours is the head of Edgewater Boats, which he bought many years ago and has successfully built up.

He has a military contract of some kind for coastal patrol boats, and he delivers.

I can’t put my hands on a photo of the military model, but here’s the Edgewater website with some pics. Very nice boats:

http://www.edgewaterboats.com/


31 posted on 09/06/2009 10:51:14 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: US Navy Vet

Aircraft are no different. The one exception to both of these situations was my experience in Japanese shipyards, and aircraft depots. They work six days a week, their work was good, and the vessels and aircraft were in really good shape when they came out.


32 posted on 09/06/2009 10:53:24 AM PDT by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: MarkL

Well said.


33 posted on 09/06/2009 11:19:18 AM PDT by A.Hun (Common sense is no longer common.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: papasmurf
re: each bolt, nut, et al, must pass the Navy and the Shipyard’s inspection process before being used

I doubt the average reader has any idea just how demanding the testing is for materials used in a nuclear sub. I worked in the pre-test lab at a shipyard that was building four such subs, in the early 60’s. Every single piece of pipe, each fitting, every valve, everything that was to be used in the subs was brought into the lab and tested under conditions as near to on board conditions as possible. It was a huge part of the sub building program. This was the days before computers had worked their way into every facet of business life and my job was to record by hand each and every piece that was tested, when it arrived, who tested it, the outcome of the test and who it went to after testing. If an item failed the job got worse, much worse.

I still have nightmares about not being able to find some tiny little valve that was misplaced!

34 posted on 09/06/2009 11:42:30 AM PDT by jwparkerjr (God Bless America, and wake us up while you're about it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: A.Hun
I don’t understand how any self respecting American, union or not, could put so many other men’s lives in jeopardy...

Really no different, in principle, than the folks in Boston who built the tunnel with the collapsing roof.

35 posted on 09/06/2009 11:57:11 AM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: em2vn
It all began when a weld inspector at the Newport News shipyard was found to be falsifying the inspection of welding jobs on four Virginia class submarines and a Nimitz class carrier. Some 10,000 welds had to be re-inspected

Fraud is a constant risk in quality assurance groups.

36 posted on 09/06/2009 12:25:40 PM PDT by fso301
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AuntB; Willie Green

Politicall correct types and supporters of free trade & outsourcing won’t like this question, but were these defective parts manufactured overseas?


37 posted on 09/06/2009 12:26:39 PM PDT by Clintonfatigued (Liberal sacred cows make great hamburger)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: _Jim
Great. You have it all nailed down.

I realize it's much more fun to say "It's the Union's fault".

38 posted on 09/06/2009 1:01:35 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Non-Sequitur
I realize it's much more fun to say "It's the Union's fault".
So if its not, what is it?

Who is cutting corners?

The contractor? Or the [union] labor he hires to do a job?

Who is cutting corners?

39 posted on 09/06/2009 1:11:26 PM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 38 | View Replies]

To: Vroomfondel; SC Swamp Fox; Fred Hayek; NY Attitude; P3_Acoustic; Bean Counter; investigateworld; ...
SONOBUOY PING!

Never forget that your ship/aircraft/weapon was built by the lowest bidder.

Click on pic for past Navair pings.

Post or FReepmail me if you wish to be enlisted in or discharged from the Navair Pinglist.
The only requirement for inclusion in the Navair Pinglist is an interest in Naval Aviation.
This is a medium to low volume pinglist.

40 posted on 09/06/2009 1:43:55 PM PDT by magslinger (Inside every father is a Bryan Mills waiting to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Dick Bachert

Do the $12 mil include that lethal looking weepon? If he fires that, the pram will be propelled backwards at terminal velocity (whatever that may be).


41 posted on 09/06/2009 2:54:38 PM PDT by Ole Okie (American)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: magslinger
Never forget that your ship/aircraft/weapon was built by the lowest bidder.
And a lot of the 'winning' designs were the result of competitions between Aerospace companies/contractors, in a lot of cases are the result of decades, if not centuries worth of experience on the part of the design staff, and also that so-called 'lowest bidder' contract might turn out to be a cost-plus contract on new technology/development stuff ...

I think it is unfair to simply label equipment deisgned for out fighting military as 'built by the lowest bidder'. Some competance is also expected by those bidding on such contracts, especially on the higher-performance or performance-critical platforms (think aircraft, satellites).

42 posted on 09/06/2009 6:09:45 PM PDT by _Jim
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: _Jim

Everything you say is true. The US aquires some of the finest weapon systems in the world and it is unfair to refer to them as being made by the lowest bidder, but when you are in the field and run up against the technical limitations of aforementioned system, fair ain’t in it.


43 posted on 09/07/2009 12:49:51 PM PDT by magslinger (Inside every father is a Bryan Mills waiting to get out.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson