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US government releases smart grid framework
SMART METERS.com ^ | Saturday, 26 September 2009 16:27 | n/a

Posted on 09/29/2009 2:59:53 AM PDT by Cindy

A 90-page document released by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) released on September 24 proposes 77 standards for smart grid development. The report also detailed 14 areas that the government agency will prioritize in order to facilitate development.

Utilities, regulators, and vendors have been waiting for this release from the NIST. The report details specific standards that utilities and developers will be expected to meet in their smart grid deployment. The institute will continue working on cybersecurity standards which should be released by the end of the year.

The NIST began working on a set of standards earlier this year in order to encourage cohesive smart grid development in the United States. A process that normally could take several years has been compressed into a few months.

“At stake is America’s energy future and the economic competitiveness of our nation,” said Commerce Secretary Gary Locke as he unveiled the NIST report at this week’s GridWeek conference in Washington D.C.

The report is now up for public comment for 30 days. It is hoped the framework will eventually become a testing and certification process that all smart grid technologies deployed within America will be expected to meet.

Utilities and developers alike are certainly scrutinizing the report as their future will depend upon adhering to it. Transforming the country’s power grid is a mammoth effort – there are some 5.4 million miles of transmission lines that connect 22,000 electricity substations and approximately 130 million mostly conventional electric meters.

(Excerpt) Read more at smartmeters.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Front Page News; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: arra; billions; energy; nist; powergrid; smartgrid

1 posted on 09/29/2009 2:59:53 AM PDT by Cindy
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To: All
SNIPPET from post no. 1:


"The report is now up for public comment for 30 days."

2 posted on 09/29/2009 3:00:37 AM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

It’s real simple. Use too much juice, they turn you off, and fine you. Oh yeah, that’s their health care plan...


3 posted on 09/29/2009 3:04:17 AM PDT by WVKayaker (Futility: trying to slam a revolving door!)
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To: Cindy

What are the key points people might like to comment on?


4 posted on 09/29/2009 3:18:15 AM PDT by chuck_the_tv_out ( <<< click my name: now featuring Freeper classifieds)
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To: All

More details:

Note: The following text is a quote:

http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/smartgrid_092409.html

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:
Sept. 24, 2009

WASHINGTON – Commerce Secretary Gary Locke today unveiled an accelerated plan for developing standards to transform the U.S. power distribution system into a secure, more efficient and environmentally friendly Smart Grid and create clean-energy jobs.

The draft of the report is available at http://www.nist.gov/public_affairs/releases/smartgrid_interoperability.pdf.

Produced by the Commerce Department’s National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), the approximately 90-page document identifies about 80 initial standards that will enable the vast number of interconnected devices and systems that will make up the nationwide Smart Grid to communicate and work with each other. These standards will support interoperability of all the various pieces of the system—ranging from large utility companies down to individual homes and electronic devices. The report also lists a set of 14 “priority action plans” that address the most important gaps in the initial standard set.

“To use an analogy from the construction world, this report is like a designer’s first detailed drawing of a complex structure,” said Locke in prepared remarks. “It presents a high-level conceptual model to ensure that everyone is on the same page before moving forward to develop more detailed, formal Smart Grid architectures. This high-level model is critical to help plan where to go next.”

The draft will be posted for a 30-day period of public comment and review. According to George Arnold, NIST’s National Coordinator for Smart Grid Interoperability, finalizing the standards will ensure that the grid transformation goes both smoothly and rapidly—a priority of the Obama Administration. About $4.5 billion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) funds to the Department of Energy also are slated for Smart Grid demonstration projects.

“Because of the urgent need to remake the grid into a modern power distribution system, we have set a timetable that is much swifter than usual for establishing these standards,” said Arnold. “But at the same time, we also want to be certain that the initial standards we establish will hold up in the future so that investments in the Smart Grid will not become prematurely obsolete.”

When completed, the Smart Grid will employ real-time, two-way digital information and communication technologies in the operation of the nation’s electricity grid. The system would allow consumers to better manage and control their energy use and costs, reduce America’s dependence on foreign oil and create clean-energy jobs.

The draft report, entitled NIST Framework and Roadmap for Smart Grid Interoperability Standards, Release 1.0, incorporates input from more than 1,500 industry, government and other stakeholders who have participated in the NIST framework development process.

The Framework draft includes:

a basic set of standards for interoperability and security, identifying roughly 80 specific standards and specifications to support the Smart Grid;

the 14 “priority action plans” that describe what is being done immediately to fill important gaps where additional or revised standards are needed. These outline everything from plug-in electric vehicles, to home energy management systems, to distributed intelligence aimed at keeping the grid from developing problems before they arise. Each plan identifies standards organizations responsible for addressing them, a recommended approach and aggressive timelines to develop solutions to these needs; and

a summary of a separate NIST cyber security strategy, which aims to protect the Smart Grid against the modern threat of cyber attack.

Following the 30-day public review and comment on the draft, NIST will finalize the Framework document, which is the culmination of the first phase of NIST’s three-phase approach to develop Smart Grid standards. Phase 1, the engagement of stakeholders in a participatory public process to identify applicable standards and gaps in currently available standards and priorities for new standardization activities, ends with the final publication of the Framework report after public comments have been incorporated.

Phase 2 will establish a private-public partnership and forum—a Smart Grid Interoperability Panel—to drive longer-term progress. NIST is using ARRA funds to establish the panel by the end of 2009. Phase 3 will develop and implement a framework for testing and certification of how standards are implemented in Smart Grid devices, systems and processes. NIST is consulting with industry, government and other stakeholders to develop a plan for a testing and certification framework by the end of 2009 and take steps toward implementation in 2010.

The results of NIST’s ongoing work on standards for the Smart Grid also provides input to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which under the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act is charged with instituting, once sufficient consensus is achieved, rulemaking proceedings to adopt the standards and protocols necessary to ensure Smart Grid functionality and interoperability in interstate transmission of electric power, and in regional and wholesale electricity markets.

For more information on NIST’s work with Smart Grid, visit http://www.nist.gov/smartgrid/.

As a non-regulatory agency, NIST advances measurement science, standards and technology in ways that enhance economic security and improve our quality of life.


5 posted on 09/29/2009 3:22:28 AM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

Isn’t this the plan to give the Feds control of your thermostat?


6 posted on 09/29/2009 3:24:07 AM PDT by Entrepreneur (The environmental movement is filled with watermelons - green on the outside, red on the inside)
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To: Entrepreneur

I am currently staying in an apartment in Stockholm, Sweden. I have zero control on my thermostat. The heat is set by “the building” and it never goes above 71 degrees.


7 posted on 09/29/2009 3:30:35 AM PDT by riri (http://rationaljingo.blogspot.com/)
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To: Cindy

Yes, that centralized control always works. What we need are local nukes...230 of them and we’d not worry about the grid, ever.


8 posted on 09/29/2009 3:31:57 AM PDT by 1010RD (First Do No Harm)
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To: Cindy

wonder who gets to be the electricity czar.


9 posted on 09/29/2009 3:35:27 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand ("Isn't the Golden Mean the secret to something," I parried? "Yes," Blue replied. "Mediocrity.")
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To: riri
I am currently staying in an apartment in Stockholm, Sweden. I have zero control on my thermostat. The heat is set by “the building” and it never goes above 71 degrees.

New Yorkers -- the average ones -- know all about this,and many of us own space heaters.

In Florida, Fla Power incentived customers in the most compelling way to allow their geniuses to control their air conditioners, with predictable results.

The technology exists, merely awaiting the right circumstances to require "sacrifices" for the "good" of something...who knows, perhaps "the children."

10 posted on 09/29/2009 3:38:21 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand ("Isn't the Golden Mean the secret to something," I parried? "Yes," Blue replied. "Mediocrity.")
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To: the invisib1e hand

My is alarming to me is the attitude. They expect that heat is included in rent. And it doesn’t bother them that they have no control. I don’t like to be cold and coming from Arizona, 71 degrees i cold. I don’t care what the cost is...I want to control my own environment!


11 posted on 09/29/2009 3:40:41 AM PDT by riri (http://rationaljingo.blogspot.com/)
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To: the invisib1e hand

You’ll need to be an undergraduate without any experience in the field or someone with solid tax evasion skills to handle a posiition like this. Anti-Americanism is a must.

If you don’t hate your country, how can you serve it?


12 posted on 09/29/2009 3:40:46 AM PDT by 1010RD (First Do No Harm)
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To: riri

Supposed to read—What is alarming to me


13 posted on 09/29/2009 3:41:14 AM PDT by riri (http://rationaljingo.blogspot.com/)
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To: Cindy
"US government releases smart grid framework":

C O N T R O L under the guise of "saving energy".

14 posted on 09/29/2009 3:43:11 AM PDT by Jmouse007 (Thank you)
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To: riri
I don’t care what the cost is...I want to control my own environment!

Typical American cowboy imperialist attitude.

You'd be surprised how used to socialism New Yorkers are.

15 posted on 09/29/2009 3:44:12 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand ("Isn't the Golden Mean the secret to something," I parried? "Yes," Blue replied. "Mediocrity.")
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To: riri
What is alarming to me

Thought you were practicing your Sverige on us.

16 posted on 09/29/2009 3:45:06 AM PDT by the invisib1e hand ("Isn't the Golden Mean the secret to something," I parried? "Yes," Blue replied. "Mediocrity.")
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To: Entrepreneur

This is interesting:

“Energy Management Controller

A set of functions that manage energy consumption as a agent for the customer. Physically, these functions may be embedded in a residential gateway, in an appliance, or in a stand-alone device.

Assumptions:

1. The Energy Management Controller makes local decisions about energy consumption based on customer preferences, customer budget, appliance energy and operational requirements, energy costs, and energy events (such as temporary supply limitation). This is called “distributed load control.”

2. The utility or an intermediary energy management service provider is responsible for sending data about energy costs and energy events.

3. The only required data sent to the utility are aggregated energy consumption data for billing. The customer decides how often consumption data are sent to the utility based on the tariffs offered by the utility and the tariff chosen by the customer. The data sent may be disaggregated for specific appliances (such as HVAC) depending on the tariff chosen.

4. The Energy Management Controller and associated appliances, some of which may include network connections (”smart appliances”), may be furnished by the utility or by third parties, or may be purchased from retailers by consumers.

5. Utilities or third-party service suppliers may optionally contract with customers to manage energy consumption remotely by controlling appliance usage. This is called “direct load control.”

I’d say this is giving the Feds control not only of your thermostat but your washer, dryer, hotwater heater, computer, tvs, refrierator, yup, everything that runs on power.

Can you say CONTROL over your life? I knew you could.


17 posted on 09/29/2009 4:06:37 AM PDT by OpusatFR (Those embryos are little humans in progress. Using them for profit is slavery.)
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To: Cindy
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

Who gave them the authority to regulate energy? Take a look at what they've done with the authority to "regulate commerce among the several states".

18 posted on 09/29/2009 4:12:45 AM PDT by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
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To: OpusatFR
I’d say this is giving the Feds control not only of your thermostat but your washer, dryer, hotwater heater, computer, tvs, refrierator, yup, everything that runs on power.

There is no technology for that. They can't even control your electricity on different circuits unless someone comes in and rewires your panel. All the appliances today have no technology for them to control it. You'd have to replace all of them with CPU controlled circuitry. I have read where they are starting to produce appliances with smarty technology but full implementation would be decades off.

19 posted on 09/29/2009 4:21:16 AM PDT by raybbr (It's going to get a lot worse now that the anchor babies are voting!)
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To: Cindy
The results of NIST’s ongoing work on standards for the Smart Grid also provides input to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, which under the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act is charged with instituting, once sufficient consensus is achieved, rulemaking proceedings to adopt the standards and protocols necessary to ensure Smart Grid functionality and interoperability in interstate transmission of electric power, and in regional and wholesale electricity markets.

You need to realize they can change your entire energy delivery system without it ever going through congress. This is the other hand we need to be watching in the whole Cap and Tax scenario. Even if they don't get Cap & Tax, this is where they will still have the authority to affect our energy delivery system. President Bush signed this act so we could improve the security of the grid, we are going to see just how far they will abuse the authority this Act gave them.

20 posted on 09/29/2009 4:23:33 AM PDT by EBH (it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new Government)
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To: raybbr

They have 4.6 billion to come up with some.


21 posted on 09/29/2009 4:26:07 AM PDT by EBH (it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new Government)
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To: the invisib1e hand
wonder who gets to be the electricity czar?


22 posted on 09/29/2009 5:47:29 AM PDT by TLI ( ITINERIS IMPENDEO VALHALLA)
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To: Cindy
This sounds like both a marxist and utility owner's wet dream. The Marxist gets told everything you do, and control of some things and the utility gets time-of-day and month-of-year charging. It's just another ration-and-control scheme, where the utility get more money for less work and the government gets to hand out special favors via discounts for special persons.

The utilities have a point, that peak hour electricity does cost more. But that's just the nature of the beast, with daily, weekly and yearly cycles in use. Doing the smart grid thing so we can force everybody to swelter in unison in August is almost French, in that we'll have the old folks dropping dead every August.

23 posted on 09/29/2009 6:13:32 AM PDT by slowhandluke
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To: WVKayaker

Actually, I think its more like preventing cascades like the one that blacked out the the North East. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing.
I would have called it a “Robust Grid” rather than a smart grid, but there ya go.


24 posted on 09/29/2009 6:19:29 AM PDT by Little Ray (Obama is a kamikaze president aimed at the heart of this Republic.)
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To: Cindy

argh...

Just like with the labeling of ‘green’ anything, the use of the term ‘smart grid’ sounds wonderful. Why would anyone want to continue with the old (we’re told) dumb grid when you can have a smart one?

We’re also told this is to give ‘me’ more control of my energy use. Hogwash. I have full control of my energy use now... and I like it that way.

Ok, I know why the politicians use simplistic, evasive terms about what they want to do to you. And I understand why the state-controlled-media echoes those remarks and denigrates those trying to warn us about the program. But what I don’t get is why normal folks hear ‘smart grid’ and just buy into it.

At this point the gov’ment has NO credibility. How can a system that can monitor/control down to the individual device be put in and save-you-money without a huge up-front cost and produce savings without limiting your access to electricity? Stupid, stupid people. Evil, deceitful politicians.


25 posted on 09/29/2009 6:54:25 AM PDT by cheee (Flee from Evil ... and don't leave a forwarding address...)
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To: riri

I am currently staying in an apartment in Stockholm, Sweden. I have zero control on my thermostat. The heat is set by “the building” and it never goes above 71 degrees.
_________________
I won’t live in a country that like that, I just won’t.


26 posted on 09/29/2009 7:18:03 AM PDT by mojitojoe (Socialism is just the last “feel good” step on the path to Communism and its slavery. Lenin)
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To: All

ON THE INTERNET:

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/smartgrid/index


27 posted on 09/29/2009 1:11:11 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Little Ray
Actually, I think its more like preventing cascades like the one that blacked out the the North East.

You may not have noticed, but the utilities have already fixed that problem. They've been trying to make the transmission grid continually more robust for 100 years or so, and pretty much getting a good balance between growth, cost and robustness.

You won't see large scale blackouts again until the load grows to the point that the electric utilities can not support the peak load because the government won't let them build enough plants.

At that point, the only choice is rolling blackouts. The smart grid just turns off Grannies AC so she dies in the heat so that the rides at Six Flags can keep rolling, or some other equally ugly tradeoff.

28 posted on 10/07/2009 3:58:39 PM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: raybbr; EBH
There is no technology for that. They can't even control your electricity on ...

Oh yes there is. There is technology for ethernet over power lines, which would allow the power company to provide a control channel into every home. All it takes at that point is introducing any of a number of home control systems. And the big suppliers have done this, but in a much more complete way than my simple example.

Siemens describes their smart grid solutions as including tricks like turning temperatures down in a freezer to store cold so the freezer needn't run while power is shifted elsewhere. This is a complete control system, from generator to consumer.

http://www.usa.siemens.com/answers/features/usa_answers/us/en/pdf/smart_clever_en.pdf

Now, the technology doesn't exist in your house at the moment, but the idea is to mandate it in the future, so that you won't be able to sell a house with non-smart-grid furnace, ac, or appliances.

29 posted on 10/07/2009 4:09:57 PM PDT by slowhandluke (It's hard to be cynical enough in this age.)
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To: slowhandluke
It is situations like this,

FirstEnergy Bulb Giveaway To Cost Customers
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2356668/posts

that they will claim force their hand. We will here the very real talk of doing this for the ‘greater good.’ I am already hearing FirstEnergy trying to explain this as a government requirement. Thousands have contacted the Gov. and the Ohio PUCO over this silly little light bulb. Can't imagine what happens when they try the smart grid stuff.

30 posted on 10/08/2009 3:45:20 AM PDT by EBH (it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new Government)
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To: Cindy
1. Government goals

To be provided for each of the following constituencies:

- Congress

To sponsor coordination and cooperation among federal agencies and power industry stakeholders in the Smart Grid effort to:

improve reliability and efficiency of the electric power system, and to reduce adverse environmental impacts

promote customer participation in demand response and other programs, and have greater control over their electric energy usage

increase the number of renewable energy sources
http://collaborate.nist.gov/twiki-sggrid/bin/view/SmartGrid/H2G

...have greater control over their electric energy usage, sounds like that is the customer right? It is under the Congress heading and if you read further down the collaboration page you find an interesting statement regarding consumers,

“Minimize lifestyle impact to accommodate demand response,” and “- Minimize impact of smart grid (demand response) on lifestyle.”

This whole energy Independence thing through draconian controls is not going to work. The system needs more electricity producers and appears to go unaddressed in the entire document.

31 posted on 10/08/2009 4:21:32 AM PDT by EBH (it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new Government)
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To: slowhandluke
Now, the technology doesn't exist in your house at the moment, but the idea is to mandate it in the future, so that you won't be able to sell a house with non-smart-grid furnace, ac, or appliances.

Isn't that in the Cap & Tax bill? I know I read that somewhere in the massive documents they've been trying to push through.

32 posted on 10/08/2009 4:23:43 AM PDT by EBH (it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute a new Government)
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