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Recession Intensifies GenX Discontent At Work
WSMV Nashville, TN. ^ | 11/15/2009 | WSMV

Posted on 11/15/2009 4:55:08 PM PST by The Magical Mischief Tour

CHICAGO -- They're antsy and edgy, tired of waiting for promotion opportunities at work as their elders put off retirement. A good number of them are just waiting for the economy to pick up so they can hop to the next job, find something more fulfilling and get what they think they deserve. Oh, and they want work-life balance, too. Sounds like Gen Y, the so-called "entitlement generation," right? Not necessarily, say people who track the generations. In these hard times, they're also hearing strong rumblings of discontent from Generation X. They're the 32- to 44-year-olds who are wedged between baby boomers and their children, often feeling like forgotten middle siblings -- and increasingly restless at work as a result. "All of a sudden, we've gone from being the young upstarts to being the curmudgeons," says Bruce Tulgan, a generational consultant who's written books about various age groups, including his fellow Gen Xers.

This isn't the first time Gen Xers have faced tough times. They came of age during a recession and survived the dot-com bust of 2000. In recent years, though, more members of the generation -- stereotyped early on as jaded individualists -- had families or began settling down in other ways. It was time, they thought, to enjoy the rewards of paying some dues. "We were starting to buy into the system, at least to some extent," Tulgan says, "and then we got the rug pulled out from under us." Now, in this latest recession, nearly two-thirds of baby boomer workers, ages 50 to 61, say they might have to push back their retirement, according to a recent survey from Pew Research.

Meanwhile, on the other end of the age spectrum are Gen Yers, who are often cheaper to hire and heralded for their coveted high-tech knowledge, even though many Gen Xers consider themselves just as technologically savvy. "It's so annoying," says Lisa Chamberlain, another Gen Xer who wrote the book "Slackonomics: Generation X in the Age of Creative Destruction." ''First, it was always the baby boomers overshadowing everything. Then there was this brief period in the mid-'90s where Gen X was cool. "Now it's, 'What are the new kids doing?' It's like 'Yo, hello, the Google guys are Gen Xers.'"

They can sound a little whiny. But there's also some evidence that Gen Xers really are being taken for granted at work. One survey done this year for Deloitte Consulting LLP, for instance, found that nearly two-thirds of executives at large companies were most concerned about losing Gen Y employees, while less than half of them had similar concerns about losing Gen Xers. The assumption is often that Gen Yers are the least loyal and most mobile, says Robin Erickson, a manager with Deloitte's human capital division.

However, she points out that a companion survey of employees found that only about 37 percent of Gen Xers said they planned to stay in their current jobs after the recession ends, compared with 44 percent of Gen Yers, 50 percent of baby boomers and 52 percent of senior citizen workers who said the same. Everyone surveyed worried about job security. Gen X and Gen Y were most likely to complain about pay. But a "lack of career progress," was by far the biggest gripe from Gen Xers, with 40 percent giving that as a reason for their restlessness, compared with 30 percent of Gen Yers, 20 percent of baby boomers and 14 percent of senior workers. Gen Yers, meanwhile, were more likely than the other generations to cite "lack of challenges in the job" as a reason they would leave, while baby boomers more often chose "poor employee treatment during the downturn" and a "lack of trust in leadership." The Deloitte study warns of a "resume' tsunami" once economic recovery begins, especially among Gen Xers, and notes that many executives were largely unaware of employee complaints unrelated to money.

Such findings don't surprise Rich Yudhishthu, a 37-year-old Gen Xer who's a business development consultant from Minneapolis. "The lack of promotional opportunities has pretty much killed job loyalty within a generation," he says. Liza Potts, a 35-year-old professor at Old Dominion University in Norfolk, Va., agrees, but also notes that the disillusionment took hold for many of her peers as far back as childhood. "Many of my friends had hoped to have jobs like their parents -- places they would stay forever that would take care of them like they did their parents. But then we saw that start to crumble for our folks," she says, recalling friends whose fathers and mothers got laid off from companies such as IBM or had to relocate.

Now worried about their own foreclosures, debt and unemployment, her generation is left to do the soul-searching their parents did. "Is there still time to become something different? Must we just accept where we are? Is there time to innovate elsewhere?" asks Potts who left her own career in the software and Internet industry for a life in academia. It's meant less money, she says, but also more freedom to choose her work hours and projects. In Chicago, 40-year-old real estate agent Adon Navarette has taken on extra jobs to make it, from consultant for an energy supply company to starting his own health and wellness business. He's heard his peers sniping about other generations, but also thinks their experience with other rough economic patches makes them resilient, too. It's a pivotal moment, he says. "What's going to define me as a Gen Xer is how I come out of this. What's going to define me is, 'What have I done to allow myself to take advantage of the market when the market turns around?'" he says.

Sometimes, it means working for less money.

Jon Anne Willow, co-publisher of ThirdCoastDigest.com, an online arts and culture site in Milwaukee, is among employers who've recently been able to hire more experienced candidates for jobs traditionally filled by 20somethings. They're hungry to work, she says. And as she sees it, that gives her fellow Gen Xers and the baby boomers she's hired a distinct advantage over a lot of the Gen Yers she's come across. "When the dust settles, they'll be exactly as they were before and we'll just have to sift through them and take the ones that actually get it and hope the rest find employment in fast food," she quips. Spoken like a truly jaded Gen Xer.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society
KEYWORDS: amoral; bums; generationy; genx; lazy; slackers; workplace

1 posted on 11/15/2009 4:55:09 PM PST by The Magical Mischief Tour
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
And when the generations interests collide?


2 posted on 11/15/2009 5:01:41 PM PST by HangnJudge
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
a companion survey of employees found that only about 37 percent of Gen Xers said they planned to stay in their current jobs after the recession ends

I don't think it's just Gen Xers who feel this way.  A lot of employers are in for a rude awakening when - and it will - the economy eventually turns around.

3 posted on 11/15/2009 5:20:26 PM PST by WeatherGuy
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To: qam1; ItsOurTimeNow; PresbyRev; Fraulein; StoneColdGOP; Clemenza; m18436572; InShanghai; xrp; ...

Xer Ping

Ping list for the discussion of the politics and social (and sometimes nostalgic) aspects that directly effects Generation Reagan / Generation-X (Those born from 1965-1981) including all the spending previous generations are doing that Gen-X and Y will end up paying for.

Freep mail me to be added or dropped. See my home page for details and previous articles.  

4 posted on 11/15/2009 5:26:33 PM PST by qam1 (There's been a huge party. All plates and the bottles are empty, all that's left is the bill to pay)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

On behalf of all my fellow Generation Xers I want to thank the self-proclaimed Greatest Generation and the Baby Boomers for leaving us a country in such a strong moral, economic, and political position.

For my fellow Generation Xers and upcoming Yers, enjoy the illusion cast upon you by American Idol while you can. In the meantime, pick up “Atlas Shrugged” and go through a few pages during commercial breaks.


5 posted on 11/15/2009 5:31:54 PM PST by DeuceTraveler (Freedom is a never ending struggle)
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To: WeatherGuy

Yeah right. I would not be betting on any economic turn around unless a judge will hear the Hussein BC issue. If he stays in until 2012 he will do incredible damage.


6 posted on 11/15/2009 5:33:50 PM PST by Frantzie (Judge David Carter - democrat & dishonorable Marine like John Murtha.)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

I don’t see much of a chance at an economic turn around as long as the democrat and rhinos wield power.

We are going to need to fundamentally transform America. Vast cuts in government agencies and government spending. Punitive corporate taxes and taxes on small businesses must go if we are to succeed in transforming our economy. Entitlement programs need to be cut off for future generations.


7 posted on 11/15/2009 5:39:32 PM PST by listenhillary (A "cult of personality" arises when a leader uses mass media creating idealized/heroic public image)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

More generational generalizing. There has always been a lack of promotion possibilities. “promotional possibilities” are always there for self-promoters.

I think this likely describes the majority of Gen Xers like I was Maynard Krebs.


8 posted on 11/15/2009 5:41:08 PM PST by decimon
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

Gen X and Yers if you want to preserve your jobs and have a chance for higher pay, establish an American management system that understands that if America keeps her high tech secrets, she keeps her high standard of living. The boomers blew it by accepting the notion of globalism that everything and everyone can be outsourced without thinking what is the impact on the people of the United States. I remember an old saying, if we give everything the unions want, we will have no trade, but if we give corporate America everything they want we will have no good paying jobs. I think we swung too much to corporate America (just look at what the Wall Street lead, government enablement did to our economy and finances). Somewhere between the two extreme viewpoints is the answer. I think that will be the challenge our new generation of leaders must resolve.
Just as an example, China and the emerging world is a good example where the stable concepts of socialism and the freedom of capitalism are mixed together that meets the unique characteristics of the country. These nations are emerging and prospering. Europe sticks to pure socialism and they stagnate, the US sticks to free for all capitalism and they just destroyed themselves with one gigantic financial bubble and believe it or not are trying to inflate an even larger one. Europe and the US style of economics is not the answer.


9 posted on 11/15/2009 5:41:25 PM PST by Fee (Peace, prosperity, jobs and common sense)
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To: DeuceTraveler

Perfectly, perfectly stated!!!


10 posted on 11/15/2009 5:43:16 PM PST by GOPsterinMA ("Henceforth, you shall be known as...'Nobel Obama'".)
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To: listenhillary

“Entitlement programs need to be cut off for future generations.”

No. They need to be cut off now.

And now we will hear from “conservatives” who have all kinds of reasons why their particular form of welfare is special and shouldn’t cut off.


11 posted on 11/15/2009 5:44:54 PM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
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To: Fee

The United States in not Captilistic, it is Corportist. The small and middle sized businesses pay for the subsidizations of the Too Big Too Fails and Unionized Manufacturing. If we were a Capitalistic country we would have less big banks, more small banks. Not a Big 3, but the small 30 auto makers. People would have more skill sets, because being a local technical expert in your community would give you greater wealth and social standing. There would be an incentive to achieve, instead of dropping out of school and trying to be an NBA star for your one small chance. Being a Capatilist Republic should be our goal, but instead we are a Corportist Oligarchy. Don’t let the Oligarchs use Crony Capatilism and tell you that we now need Socialism. Socialism is just another scam that keeps the powers that be in power. Look at Al Gore for an example. He can go from a Socialist Environmentalist to a Corportist power player with his own Congressionally-backed firm depending on the audience and setting.


12 posted on 11/15/2009 5:52:05 PM PST by DeuceTraveler (Freedom is a never ending struggle)
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To: qam1

I’d settle for them returning all the money I’ve dumped into Social Security over my last 20 years. Then at least I can let my kids inherit it to help pay their future draconian tax burden.

— Class of 84


13 posted on 11/15/2009 5:54:08 PM PST by ReaganGeneration2
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To: achilles2000

You are going to need to have a cut off age. If we have to sell national assets to meet obligations to those that have given significant chunks of money expecting some day to benefit from that investment, we should sell the national assets. Add means testing to SS and medicare, medicaid.

Get rid of the IRS and transition to a flat tax, git rid of onerous regulations and we will grow our way out of our current predicament.


14 posted on 11/15/2009 6:06:31 PM PST by listenhillary (A "cult of personality" arises when a leader uses mass media creating idealized/heroic public image)
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To: listenhillary

git = get


15 posted on 11/15/2009 6:07:55 PM PST by listenhillary (A "cult of personality" arises when a leader uses mass media creating idealized/heroic public image)
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To: qam1

Ping!


16 posted on 11/15/2009 6:10:55 PM PST by Keith Brown (Among the other evils being unarmed brings you, it causes you to be despised Machiavelli.)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
The Deloitte study warns of a "resume' tsunami" once economic recovery begins, especially among Gen Xers.

Yeah, we'll they may have resumes, but the Baby-Boomers will still have the jobs. I am a well paid Boomer manager. I am 63. Why should I "fire myself" and retire at 66??! We'll, I won't. I am healthy and fit and maybe at 70 I'll consider retirement. But just maybe. And the X'ers waiting..will just have to wait. That's life. Get over it. And the comment, "once economic recovery begins" is a joke. That may take 10 years! Sorry Xer's, you may be out of luck. Poor timing on when you were born. Lot's of luck.

17 posted on 11/15/2009 6:23:49 PM PST by ExtremeUnction
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
The Deloitte study warns of a "resume' tsunami" once economic recovery begins, especially among Gen Xers.

Yeah, we'll they may have resumes, but the Baby-Boomers will still have the jobs. I am a well paid Boomer manager. I am 63. Why should I "fire myself" and retire at 66??! We'll, I won't. I am healthy and fit and maybe at 70 I'll consider retirement. But just maybe. And the X'ers waiting..will just have to wait. That's life. Get over it. And the comment, "once economic recovery begins" is a joke. That may take 10 years! Sorry Xer's, you may be out of luck. Poor timing on when you were born. Lot's of luck.

18 posted on 11/15/2009 6:23:49 PM PST by ExtremeUnction
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To: fieldmarshaldj; rmlew; Cacique
They're the 32- to 44-year-olds who are wedged between baby boomers and their children, often feeling like forgotten middle siblings -- and increasingly restless at work as a result. "All of a sudden, we've gone from being the young upstarts to being the curmudgeons,"

My GF learned the phrase "curmudgeon" by trying to figure out a good English word for my "critical grouchiness." In this sense, I guess I am a typical GenXer.

BTW: What's orange and looks good on a Millennial/Gen Yer?

Fire, of course...

19 posted on 11/15/2009 6:26:08 PM PST by Clemenza (Remember our Korean War Veterans)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
At 53, I'm still supporting my wife and 3 sons in their twenties. What generation is that? No matter. I can't retire. My 401k was devastated by the Wall St looters and I expect to be working for another 15 or 20 years. I won't be vacating positions for whiners who want a promotion. As a software engineer, I'm perpetually updating my skill sets to track with the current state of the art. If you stagnate, you'll be unemployed. If your breadth of knowledge and skill is too narrow, job opportunities will not be there. Just because you have skills is no guarantee. You have to perpetually market those skills to those with needs and funds to pay you. I've had multiple proposals that reached the stage of approval and pending funding only to have some politician rip the money away with the stroke of a pen. Lots of time, money and effort is expended with no return on the effort. That's the nature of the current economy.
20 posted on 11/15/2009 6:26:40 PM PST by Myrddin
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To: Clemenza

I got called a dusty old fart by one of those younger gems... at 29.


21 posted on 11/15/2009 6:29:51 PM PST by fieldmarshaldj (~"This is what happens when you find a stranger in the Alps !"~~)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

Young people in today’s America haven’t a chance for the most part...

They’re screwed, as our government and politicians completely sold them and the rest of us out.


22 posted on 11/15/2009 6:30:43 PM PST by dragnet2
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To: DeuceTraveler

I agree with you.

Skilled trades would be a good future choice for some but just like most other screwed up aspects of our country, it is not run by capitalism but by the government. The corupt government gets to decide who gets licensed, what the test is about, how much money it costs and who gets to bid on jobs. If it were truly capitalism the best skilled tradsman would get the job.


23 posted on 11/15/2009 6:56:34 PM PST by annelizly
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

These spoiled brats will whine no matter what shape the economy is in. They just plain don’t want to work!


24 posted on 11/15/2009 7:03:18 PM PST by JoeMac ("Dats all I can stands 'cuz I can't stands no more!'' Popeye The SailorMan)
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To: achilles2000

I wish I had a particular form of welfare. I’ve never received anything. Not even a student loan.

But I can see that some things need to continue.SS benefits need to continue if only for the reason that so many people have already paid into them their whole life.


25 posted on 11/15/2009 7:04:52 PM PST by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: ExtremeUnction

Ran into you before...not personaly...but your type of employee...I sat in a room with 100 of you...we’d all been laid off...DOn’t think you’re immune...and We(gen-x) do know what you think of us...Thanks for the confirmation of intent.

Appreciate it bud.


26 posted on 11/15/2009 7:46:48 PM PST by Explodo (Pessimism is simply pattern recognition)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
Someone call the WAAAHbulance for those poor widdle spoled brats.

Perhaps if their "boomer" parents had not spent so much on them giving them everything they wanted, including paying for them to go to college, then those "boomers" would have had enough money to retire long ago.

Perhaps if the "boomers" had not bought into the psychobabble school of raising children where "everyone is a winner" and all the other overprotective crap then perhaps these "Gen X & Y'er's" would know the universal truth that life is hard-there is no such thing as a free lunch and no one gives a damn about your "self esteem".

I have to laugh at these "Gen X & Y'er's" who apply for employment where I work and expect 100k to start, to write their own hours, have weekends and every holiday off and get a company car. Needless to say their resume's hit the trash after their interviews.

I have to laugh at my nephew's girlfriend who racked up 179k in student loans to go through law school and party and when she graduated decided she wanted to be a massage therapist. She fully expects her parents to sell their house to pay off her loans and buy her a car. They finally wised up and told her the harsh truth that she is an adult now. She is the one who got the loans, she is the one who signed the papers and she is responsible for paying them back. Taking responsibility for her own actions is something she does not want to do.

So "Gen X & Y'er's"...

You are adults now-get out of your parents basements and wean yourself off your parents wallets. You are responsible for yourselves and your actions. Only children blame everyone but themselves for their own problems.

27 posted on 11/15/2009 7:50:52 PM PST by Nahanni
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To: listenhillary
Add means testing to SS and medicare, medicaid.

So after I paid for forty some years into the governmental Ponzi schemes, if I was frugal and managed to actually put aside something for a rainy day and maybe even enjoy a private pension or perhaps a 401K 0r 403B, now you want to add a means test? Fine, just pay back what the government extorted from my salary before I even got to see the checks along with the time value of the money they stole. Otherwise shove your means test where the sun don't shine.

I had no choice as to participation in their shaky scams so don't try and change the rules now.

we will grow our way out of our current predicament.

Yeah, like that's gona' happen! It case you haven't noticed the Fed is busy printing money and the plan is rather obvious. They intend to inflate their way out of the hole they've dug. God help us all.

Regards,
GtG

28 posted on 11/15/2009 7:57:29 PM PST by Gandalf_The_Gray (I live in my own little world, I like it 'cuz they know me here.)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

we’ll just have to sift through them and take the ones that actually get it and hope the rest find employment in fast food,” she quips. Spoken like a truly jaded Gen Xer.

TRUELY SAD TO BE SO JADED!~


29 posted on 11/15/2009 8:54:37 PM PST by JSDude1 (www.wethepeopleindiana.org (Tea Party Member-Proud), www.travishankins.com (R- IN 09 2010!))
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To: annelizly

I agree but we need to speak this view clearly. This is not a failure of free markets because we don’t have a free market. This is a failure of government run economics.


30 posted on 11/15/2009 8:56:14 PM PST by DeuceTraveler (Freedom is a never ending struggle)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
Generation X voted overwhelmingly for fellow-Generation Xer, Obama.

They can go to hell with him as far as I'm concerned.

31 posted on 11/15/2009 9:03:28 PM PST by behzinlea
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour

How is that “hope and change” working for those who foolishly and irresponsibly executed their right to vote for an inexperienced Democrat who is undermining the foundations of this country.


32 posted on 11/15/2009 9:07:13 PM PST by af_vet_1981 (The bus came by and I got on, That's when it all began,)
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To: behzinlea
Generation X voted overwhelmingly for fellow-Generation Xer, Obama.

Um...Pres. Obama is not Gen-X. He's a baby boomer/Generation Jones (born 1961). Gen-X didn't come along until 1965.

33 posted on 11/15/2009 9:36:44 PM PST by Tamar1973 (http://koreanforniancooking.blogspot.com/)
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To: ExtremeUnction
I will never retire. I will be working until the day I die. Not a problem, since my great-grandparents all did. Only my grandparents and parents had the luxury of retirement.

Medical debt saw to that for us, but I'm not complaining. God gave us beautiful babies and they had a rough entry into this world. Doctors, hospitals, nurses are skilled service providers who earned every penny we paid them.

What medical debt didn't wipe out, this latest down turn is eating away. Our nest eggs are shrinking despite choosing "safe" options.

I plan to live life now and hopefully drop dead right around the time my children need money for college. I'm worth substantially more dead than alive!

34 posted on 11/15/2009 9:53:46 PM PST by TheWriterTX (I am a Declarationist!)
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To: listenhillary

Not bad, but as to the tax, tax everybody. If you are not paying, you have no investment in fiscal responsibility.


35 posted on 11/16/2009 3:51:10 AM PST by Jimmy Valentine (DemocRATS - when they speak, they lie; when they are silent, they are stealing the American Dream)
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To: mamelukesabre

They didn’t “pay into” anything. Payroll taxes are just taxes. There is no lockbox, trust account or anything else. The money is simply spent as it comes in - just like the money from income taxes, tariffs, etc. I am no more entitled to something because I have paid payroll tax all my life than I am entitled to something because I have paid sales taxes or income taxes. The idea that paying payroll taxes is somehow “special” is just another government engendered delusion. Social security is just another income transfre program - welfare without much of a means test.


36 posted on 11/16/2009 6:32:51 AM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
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To: achilles2000

SS is full of IOUs.

Do you understand what that means? It means there is a huge surplus that was borrowed for other purposes.

Think about that.


37 posted on 11/16/2009 6:58:17 AM PST by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: Nahanni

Probably half of my generation had Silents for parents, not Boomers. They were kids during the Great Depression and learned to be frugal and work hard and passed that on to their children.

I look around and see the half raised by Boomers (of my own friends or childhood friends) all voted for Obama. The half raised by Silents held their nose and voted for McCain. None of them live in their parent’s basement.


38 posted on 11/16/2009 7:02:03 AM PST by Betis70 (Never Forget)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
The company I used to work for offered a voluntary separatiion from the company before making cuts. The package was far better than the standard severance, so I took it. Why? A few reasons. One, I could no longer work at a company that didn't practice what they preached, meaning, what happened behind the scenes in HR was morally and ethically wrong. Two, I want to decide my own fate, not let someone else decide it for me.

It was a tough decision with a lot of risk. I was unemployed for 10 months and drew on unemployment benefits for a month before getting a contract position in the same industry, but a much smaller and friendly company. During those months of unemployment, I panicked a few times, especially at the thought of possibly losing my house.

But I never regretted the decision to leave. It was the right thing to do for me. Now, I'm going to be offered a full time position at this new company in January, doing things I'd never be able to do at the old place.

39 posted on 11/16/2009 7:06:35 AM PST by rintense (You do not advance conservatism by becoming more liberal. ~ rintense, 2006)
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To: mamelukesabre

I’ve thought about for 30+ years. It is just a scam. The IOUs are not marketable government securities. All social security promises, when you cut through the lies, is to transfer massive amounts of income from younger generations to older generations through taxation. It has never ever been anything else.


40 posted on 11/16/2009 8:16:24 AM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
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To: achilles2000

You still aren’t thinking.

If SS has been running a surplus since its inception, but there’s nothing but IOUs in the piggy bank...then OBVIOUSLY it’s quite a bit more than a scam to transfer wealth from youngsters to old people, isn’t it??!?!

Think some more.


41 posted on 11/16/2009 4:24:36 PM PST by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: ReaganGeneration2

“I’d settle for them returning all the money I’ve dumped into Social Security over my last 20 years.”

I’m 38 and I’ve been paying in for almost 25 years. I will do you one better and let them keep my money if they will let me and my employer out now.


42 posted on 11/16/2009 4:41:25 PM PST by Bluestateredman (Self-sufficiency is the American Way)
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To: JoeMac

This goes to a few others as well. This is starting to become a real point of contention for me on FR. Gen X-ers are not the bunch of slackers that you seem to think they are. I’m 38, a classic Gen-Xer. Let me tell you something. I’ve worked hard my whole life, since I was 13 years old delivering newspapers. Then I worked as a bagger in a grocery store that was so busy you had to raise your hand and ask for a bathroom break (usually denied). My parents never pampered or spoiled us for a minute. I’ve never been unemployed in my life. My wife takes care of our three boys and I bust my ass, picking up extra work whenever I can to make ends meet. I have to do so because of the punishing taxes which are being taken from me to fund the retirements of others. And guess what? When I reach “retirement age” that money will be gone.


43 posted on 11/16/2009 5:01:39 PM PST by Bluestateredman (Self-sufficiency is the American Way)
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To: The Magical Mischief Tour
"They're antsy and edgy, tired of waiting for promotion opportunities at work as their elders put off retirement."

______________________________________________

See, that right there is bullshit, and it's the first line of this whine. Cream rises. When I was younger I advanced over older guys and when I was older I worked for younger guys. I repeat...cream rises.

44 posted on 11/16/2009 5:05:06 PM PST by wtc911 ("How you gonna get down that hill?")
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To: Nahanni

Your post refers mostly to Gen Y - don’t lump us Gen Xers in with them. Most Gen Xers don’t have boomer parents. Our parents were depression and WWII babies. That was a particularly small generation, which is why Gen X is also a small generation. They also taught us, by and large, to be more self-reliant than the boomers taught their children to be, since the idea of wealth redistribution as a good thing really caught on with the boomers.

The good-for-nothing boomers spawned the smug little jerks known as Gen Y who don’t read, won’t write, still have Mommy doing their homework for them while in college, bring a parent to job interviews with them, and expect to earn $100K fresh out of school.

I say this last part with some authority as I’m tenure-track college professor currently teaching Gen Y/Millenials and I’ve seen these things first-hand. Oh, and before you call me a lazy Gen X college professor who likes to have her summers off, it’s one of the four paying jobs I work in order to pay off my student loans and get ahead while the governement takes more and more of the profits from my work.


45 posted on 11/16/2009 7:28:08 PM PST by cammie
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To: mamelukesabre

No. All “surplus” means is that one revenue stream (payroll taxes) was once enough to pay retirees receiving SS and Medicare and to provide revenue for other government boondoggles. Now the payroll tax is insufficient, so now general revenues and deficit spending are needed to transfer money to retires.

SS was always a wealth transfer scheme. It was never “insurance” or actuarially based. This was pointed out when it was adopted, and there is a vast conservative literature pointing out that how words and phrases like “trust fund”, “surplus”, “old age insurance” are just cynical misuses of words to mislead the public.

SS is not “insurance”, there is no “trust fund” (the IOUs aren’t backed by anything other than a willingness to tax the daylights out of working people for the benefit of geezers, which means that it is no different from any other statutory income transfer program.), and nobody has an “account”.


46 posted on 11/16/2009 7:34:29 PM PST by achilles2000 (Shouting "fire" in a burning building is doing everyone a favor...whether they like it or not)
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To: ExtremeUnction

Why not? You seem to enjoy toying with those that work for you until you get tired of them and fake up some reason to get them fired.. rather surprised they aren’t on to your pattern there yet.


47 posted on 12/09/2009 8:04:02 PM PST by Silicon Cowboy
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To: DeuceTraveler

Amen, brother.. the boomers (with very few exceptions) are the most self-indulgent group of whiners and children.. racing to their ultimate end to see who winds up with the most toys


48 posted on 12/09/2009 8:14:44 PM PST by Silicon Cowboy
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