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Jamaica vs. Singapore (in 1965, both were equal in wealth, today one is richer than the other)
The American ^ | 11/19/2009 | Josh Lerner

Posted on 11/19/2009 7:55:57 AM PST by SeekAndFind

In 1965 the two nations were equal in wealth. Four decades later, their standing was dramatically different. What accounts for the difference?

Silicon Valley, Singapore, Tel Aviv—the global hubs of entrepreneurial activity all bear the marks of government investment. Yet, for every successful public intervention spurring entrepreneurial activity, there are many failed efforts, wasting untold billions in taxpayer dollars. When has governmental sponsorship succeeded in boosting growth, and when has it fallen terribly short? Should the government be involved in such undertakings at all? These issues are particularly timely, given the many billions of dollars governments spend worldwide to prop up troubled industries such as automobiles, as well as the urgent public efforts to encourage “green shoots” in areas such as clean-tech in hope of stimulating an economic recovery.

Programs to boost new ventures might seem like an esoteric corner of public policy, far less important than the big issues of war and peace and health benefits, not to mention the rescue of giant firms that are on the ropes. But this perception can mislead because of the magnitude of changes that can occur when venture programs are done well.

To understand their importance, we can contrast Jamaica and Singapore. Both are relatively tiny states, with under 5 million residents apiece. Upon Singapore’s independence in 1965—three years after Jamaica’s own establishment as a nation—the two nations were about equal in wealth: the gross domestic product (in 2006 U.S. dollars) was $2,850 per person in Jamaica, slightly higher than Singapore’s $2,650. Both nations had a centrally located port, a tradition of British colonial rule, and governments with a strong capitalist orientation. (Jamaica, in addition, had plentiful natural resources and a robust tourist industry.) But four decades later, their standing was dramatically different: Singapore had climbed to a per capita GDP of $31,400 (2006 data, in current dollars), while Jamaica’s figure was only $4,800.

What accounts for the amazing difference in growth rates? There are many explanations: soon after independence, Singapore aggressively invested in infrastructure such as its port, subsidized its system of education, maintained an open and corruption-free economy, and established sovereign wealth funds that made a wide variety of investments. It has also benefited from a strategic position on the key sea lanes heading to and from East Asia. Jamaica, meanwhile, spent many years mired in political instability, particularly the disastrous administration of Michael Manley during the 1970s. Dramatic shifts from a market economy to a socialist orientation and back again, with the attendant inflation, economic instability, crippling public debt, and violence, made the development and implementation of a consistent long-run economic policy difficult.

But in explaining Singapore's economic growth, it is hard not to give considerable credit to its policies toward entrepreneurship. The government has experimented with a wide variety of efforts to develop an entrepreneurial sector:

– Providing public funds for venture investors seeking to locate in the city-state

– Subsidies for firms in targeted technologies

– Encouraging potential entrepreneurs and mentoring fledgling ventures

– Subsidies for leading biotechnology researchers to move their laboratories to Singapore

– Awards for failed entrepreneurs (with a hope of encouraging risk-taking)

While much of the initial growth in Singapore can be attributed to sound macroeconomic policies, political stability, and various other factors, the nation’s entrepreneurship initiatives have played an increasingly important role in stimulating growth.

The contrast with Jamaica is striking. Jamaica has long had a high rate of subsistence entrepreneurship: for instance, the 2006 Global Entrepreneurship Monitor survey placed it among the highest of the 42 nations it examined in various rates of entrepreneurial activity. Yet other data collected by the Monitor—and corroborated in anecdotal accounts—suggests that early-stage entrepreneurship is translated into full-fledged business activity at a very low rate. On this measure, the island nation ranked among the lowest nations (28th among the 35 countries ranked by the Monitor in 2005).

Some of the reasons for the inability of Jamaican entrepreneurs to grow can be seen in the World Bank’s reports on the barriers to entrepreneurs. The "Doing Business" series assesses, across 178 countries, the obstacles faced by an entrepreneur in performing various standardized tasks (thereby avoiding some of the subjectivity associated with other attempts to rank entrepreneurship). In several critical indicators, Jamaica ranked extremely low in the World Bank’s 2008 analysis. These suggest some of the barriers that hold back the growth of entrepreneurial enterprises:

– Of the 178 countries studied, Jamaica ranked 170th in the burden of complying with tax regulations. The ranking reflects not just the cost of the taxes themselves, but also the administrative burdens associated with complying with the tax code. The World Bank's analysis suggests that the total cost of complying with all tax laws in Jamaica amounts to just over one-half of gross profits for the typical entrepreneur. Numerous studies have suggested that one of the most important sources of financing for the typical entrepreneur is cash flow generated by the business itself, which is plowed back into the business. If so much of entrepreneurs’ income is going to meet tax obligations, business owners are unlikely to have the resources to invest in their enterprises. By way of contrast, Singapore ranked second worldwide, with a burden of just 23 percent.

– Similarly, when the cost of registering property is compared, Jamaica ranked 108th out of 178: the cost of registering property equaled 13.5 percent of the value of the property. (By comparison, the ratio in the United States is 0.5 percent of the value.) The high cost of registering property means that fewer people register their holdings, which in turn leads to less-secure property rights. Most critically, entrepreneurs who do not hold a firm legal title to property are unlikely to be able to borrow against this holding from a bank. Once again, this comparison suggests that entrepreneurs have fewer resources for growing their enterprises.

One of the most visible manifestations of this lack of activity may be in Jamaica’s productivity: from 1973 to 2007, the nation actually experienced negative productivity growth. Even more striking about this poor performance is the fact that during this period developed nations experienced substantial growth through implementing information technology, and many developing markets experienced even faster growth as they caught up with technologies adopted earlier in the West.

This disparity may change in future years: Jamaica enjoyed a surge in income with the rise of energy and commodity prices, and the most recent prime ministers have shown a greater awareness of, and willingness to lower, barriers to entrepreneurship. But the disparate experiences of Singapore and Jamaica over the past four decades demonstrate why all of us should care about public efforts to stimulate entrepreneurship.

Thus, while the dollars spent each year on entrepreneurship programs—though significant on an absolute basis—pale compared to defense and healthcare expenditures, the picture changes when we consider the long-run consequences of policies that facilitate or hinder the development of a venture sector: that is, the impact on national prosperity of a vital entrepreneurial climate. In the long run, the significance of entrepreneurial policies looms much larger

What public policies are most effective in encouraging the growth of a venture economy? Three principles in particular seem critical as guideposts.

Remember that entrepreneurial activity does not exist in a vacuum. Entrepreneurs are tremendously dependent on their partners. Without experienced lawyers able to negotiate agreements, skilled marketing gurus and engineers willing to work for low wages and a handful of stock options, and customers willing to take a chance on a young firm, success is unlikely. But despite the importance of the entrepreneurial environment, in many cases government officials hand out money without thinking about other barriers that entrepreneurs face. In some cases, crucial aspects of the entrepreneurial environment may seem tangential: for instance, the importance of robust public markets for young firms to spur venture investment. It is critical to take a broad view and address not just the availability of capital, but other components of a productive arena in which entrepreneurs could operate.

Let the market provide direction. Two successful efforts have been the Israeli Yozma program and the New Zealand Seed Investment Fund. While these programs differed in details—the former was geared toward attracting foreign venture investors; the latter encouraged locally based, early-stage funds—they shared a central element: each used matching funds to determine where public subsidies should go. In using the market for guidance, policy makers should keep in mind that these initiatives should not compete with independent venture funds or finance substandard firms that cannot raise private capital. Emulating successful initiatives in the past, programs should require a substantial amount of funds be raised from nonpublic sources. To be sure, in encouraging seed companies and groups, leaders should be aware that extensive intervention may be needed before they are “fund-able.” Programs may need to work closely with the organizations to refine strategies, recruit additional partners (perhaps even from other regions), and identify potential investors. But only through a market-based system are the critical flaws that have doomed so many earlier programs likely to be avoided.

Resist the temptation to over-engineer. In many instances, government requirements that limit the flexibility of entrepreneurs and venture investors have been detrimental. It is tempting to add restrictions on several dimensions: for instance, the locations in which the firms can operate, the type of securities venture investors can use, and the evolution of the firms (e.g., restrictions on acquisitions or secondary sales of stock). Government programs should eschew such efforts to micromanage the entrepreneurial process. While it is natural to expect that firms and groups receiving subsidies will retain a local presence or continue to target the local region for investments, these requirements should be as minimal as possible.

The promotion of new business ventures is of critical importance to all of us. While the challenges facing government initiatives may seem arcane and technical, well-considered policies are likely to profoundly influence our opportunities, as well as those of our children and grandchildren. Misguided policies, unfortunately, will also help determine the future. However challenging the encouragement of entrepreneurship may seem, it is truly too important to leave to the policy specialists!

-- Josh Lerner is the Jacob H. Schiff Professor of Investment Banking at Harvard Business School.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: jamaica; singapore

1 posted on 11/19/2009 7:55:58 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind
– Awards for failed entrepreneurs (with a hope of encouraging risk-taking)

Caning?................

2 posted on 11/19/2009 7:58:19 AM PST by Red Badger (If liberty means anything at all, it means the right to tell people what they do not want to hear.)
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To: SeekAndFind

And one has a culture based on smaoking mother nature???


3 posted on 11/19/2009 7:58:43 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: SeekAndFind

Wealth is not the end all.

Singapore is a police state, with little regard to freedom.


4 posted on 11/19/2009 7:59:35 AM PST by BGHater ("real price of every thing ... is the toil and trouble of acquiring it")
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To: SeekAndFind
I guess that wonderful Ganga culture has its drawbacks.
5 posted on 11/19/2009 8:00:45 AM PST by Cheetahcat (Zero the Wright kind of Racist! We are in a state of War with Democrats)
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To: SeekAndFind

And one has a culture based on smoking mother nature???


6 posted on 11/19/2009 8:01:45 AM PST by 2banana (My common ground with terrorists - they want to die for islam and we want to kill them)
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To: BGHater
Singapore is a police state, with little regard to freedom.

It really depends on one's personal preference. I know a lot of Singaporeans who have taken up residency in Australia because they feel the lack of Freedom in Singapore. On the other hand, I also know a lot of westerners who COME to Singapore to live and work because they prefer societal order and would not mind trading off their freedom to say criticize the government.
7 posted on 11/19/2009 8:06:52 AM PST by SeekAndFind (wH)
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To: SeekAndFind

This article is interesting to read, but it’s premise is absolutely false and cannot lead to an understanding.

Singapore is populated by high IQ Asians and Jamaica is populated by low ID Africans of West African descent. Singapore was being held back by British colonial rule and Jamaica was being carried by British colonial rule.

It’s the same pattern and it plays out everywhere it’s tried.

Is there any nation in Asia as disastrous as Somalia or Rawanda or Zimbabwe? I know the Philippines is poor, but it’s not populated with hollow eyed zombies running around with AK-47’s raping women.

Forget the comparison of Switzerland with Zimbabwe. Let’s see if Zimbabwe looks good when compared with ANY NATION in Asia.


8 posted on 11/19/2009 8:08:43 AM PST by BertWheeler (Dance and the World Dances With You!)
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To: BertWheeler

Excellent points.


9 posted on 11/19/2009 8:14:59 AM PST by Astronaut
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To: BertWheeler

Well, Cambodia’s no picnic...


10 posted on 11/19/2009 8:15:58 AM PST by RockinRight (The sleeping giant has been awoken, and he's PISSED.)
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To: BGHater

Very true - I wouldn’t want to live there.

However, they do some things right economically.


11 posted on 11/19/2009 8:16:35 AM PST by RockinRight (The sleeping giant has been awoken, and he's PISSED.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Perfect way to explain to teens that weed is bad.


12 posted on 11/19/2009 8:18:43 AM PST by Malsua
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To: BertWheeler

Got it in one, Bert. There’s no point whatsoever in blah-blahing over societal and governmental systems if you’re going to turn a blind eye to the racial aspect. It’s fact vs. fashion nowadays, and fashion’s in the ascendancy.


13 posted on 11/19/2009 8:18:44 AM PST by HelenChicago
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To: SeekAndFind
On the other hand, I also know a lot of westerners who COME to Singapore to live and work because they prefer societal order and would not mind trading off their freedom to say criticize the government.

______________________________________________________

Seventy-five years ago Germany was full of westerners like that.

14 posted on 11/19/2009 8:21:07 AM PST by wtc911 ("How you gonna get down that hill?")
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To: BertWheeler

I was wondering how many posts it would take for some dope to blame it on race. You met and exceeded all expectations.


15 posted on 11/19/2009 8:22:31 AM PST by wtc911 ("How you gonna get down that hill?")
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To: HelenChicago

Thanks Helen.

I’m too old to fall for the old “government policies” causing rape, murder, mayhem and a general positive view of looting and larceny among the general populace. A decade ago, I used to believe that the races that are constantly needing aid were just adhering to a lousy culture. Well, that’s dumb on face value. We create the culture in which we inhabit, not the other way around. And if you want to say that the past does influence us (of course it does) that’s because the people who have gone before you in an advanced society built and sustained just like you are trying to do now. The races that always need aid live only for the moment and can’t even comprehend planning ahead.

As for Jamaica, the tourists may not know it but if you wander off the “retreat path” you have a good chance of being “crimed”.

I’ve been to Singapore and it’s as nice as San Antonio, Texas. No kidding either. It’s on par with the U.S.


16 posted on 11/19/2009 8:23:39 AM PST by BertWheeler (Dance and the World Dances With You!)
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To: wtc911
Seventy-five years ago Germany was full of westerners like that.

True, but I don't think Singapore has the capability of being like Nazi Germany. They're too little and dependent on trade with other countries to be aggressive. Indonesia alone could take them out if they had a Hitler-like dictator.
17 posted on 11/19/2009 8:26:31 AM PST by SeekAndFind (wH)
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To: SeekAndFind

The difference was a mindset. Capitalism. Economic Freedom. Self Reliance.


18 posted on 11/19/2009 8:27:47 AM PST by Republic of Texas (Socialism Always Fails)
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To: BertWheeler
Singapore is populated by high IQ Asians and Jamaica is populated by low ID Africans of West African descent.

That is TOO SIMPLISTIC an explanation. I don't believe for a moment that Africans are intrinsically dumber than Asians. It is the CULTURE and HABITS that make societies prosperous. I know of MANY AFRICANS in Europe ( the UK for instance ) who do well compared to native caucasians precisely because they value education and work hard at it.

If you went to Singapore, you will see how much premium parents put on -- manners, education and tradition. 90% of Singaporeans are Chinese and most still instill the Confucian ethic of hard work and merit. Add this to the fact that a lot of Singaporeans are also Christians ( not the wishy washy liberal type, but the conservative type ), and you have a blend of Protestant work ethic coupled with the best of Confucian tradition.

Does Jamaica have something similar instilled in its populace ? I think we ought to look at that before we blame IQ.
19 posted on 11/19/2009 8:33:24 AM PST by SeekAndFind (wH)
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To: Hodar

Jamaica ping...


20 posted on 11/19/2009 8:34:34 AM PST by zlala
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To: BertWheeler
Is there any nation in Asia as disastrous as Somalia or Rawanda or Zimbabwe?

There's a country called Burma. I suggest you look it up.

21 posted on 11/19/2009 8:38:48 AM PST by GL of Sector 2814 (One man's theology is another man's belly laugh --- Robert A. Heinlein)
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To: BertWheeler

I’ve been around. How about comparing a 1 AM stroll through Singapore to the same thing in Washington DC. I’ve done the Singapore one but the Washington tour will NEVER happen.


22 posted on 11/19/2009 8:44:57 AM PST by BillM
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To: BertWheeler

I spent 10 days in Singapore and enjoyed it. Now actually living there might be a different story.


23 posted on 11/19/2009 8:45:15 AM PST by Dewey Revoltnow
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To: BillM
I’ve been around. How about comparing a 1 AM stroll through Singapore to the same thing in Washington DC. I’ve done the Singapore one but the Washington tour will NEVER happen.

Yep. Same here.
24 posted on 11/19/2009 8:46:20 AM PST by Dewey Revoltnow
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To: SeekAndFind
Jamaica worships...

Red weed Pictures, Images and Photos

Singapore worships...

Money Pictures, Images and Photos

25 posted on 11/19/2009 8:51:33 AM PST by erman (Give a man a fire, warm him for one night. Set a man on fire, warm him for the rest of his life.)
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To: HelenChicago; BertWheeler

Yeah, Because Race is the obvious explanation for the difference between North and South Korea. (Or for that matter, the difference between Zimbabwe and Botswana)


26 posted on 11/19/2009 9:16:33 AM PST by Oztrich Boy (Life is a tragedy for those who feel, but a comedy to those who think. - Horace Walpole)
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To: BertWheeler
Very astute observations.

Was in Jamaica earlier this year. To call it a sh*thole it to insult some fine respectable cesspools the world over. 80% unemployment, corruption and laziness is unavoidable. Jamaica demanded Independence from Great Britain, and Great Britain knew a smoking hot deal when they saw it; and granted it.

Just a bit further to the North is the Cayman Islands; less green and hilly when compared to Jamaica; but their economy is thriving. No interest in ever going back to Jamaica again; but would jump at the opportunity to revisit Tortuga.

27 posted on 11/19/2009 9:17:47 AM PST by Hodar (Who needs laws .... when this "feels" so right?)
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To: Oztrich Boy

South Korea and North Korea are a perfect example of why communism is a bad idea. They share the same racial characteristics.

But Jamaica isn’t a communist country. And in Zimbabwe, they HAVE freedom. People in Zimbabwe aren’t required to pick up a shovel and work for the state. But you have to have imagination to design a plan in which a showel would be an appropriate tool.

Singapore, on the other hand, is on par with some of the nicest cities in the U.S.A.


28 posted on 11/19/2009 9:24:49 AM PST by BertWheeler (Dance and the World Dances With You!)
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To: GL of Sector 2814

“There’s a country called Burma. I suggest you look it up”

Or how about north Korea? If asians are so smart on average, how come so many of them bought into disastrous political systems in the past century? (Communist China, communist vietnam, Khmer Rouge/Communist Cambodia, fascist/Emperor worship Japan, etc, etc) There may be small differences in average intelligence between the races (a claim not as yet definitively proven) but I don’t believe it can explain the differences in success between some societies and others.


29 posted on 11/19/2009 10:16:30 AM PST by -YYZ- (Strong like bull, smart like ox.)
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To: BertWheeler
Singapore, on the other hand, is on par with some of the nicest cities in the U.S.A

Singapore is better than most Cities in the USA. It's a FINE city :-P
30 posted on 11/19/2009 10:18:59 AM PST by Cronos (Nuke Mecca and Medina NOW!!! 2010 -- Kick the dims OUT!!)
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To: BGHater
What a stupid thing to say. Have you ever been to Singapore? Its extraordinary. Clean. Gorgeous and friendly to business.

Jamaica is the Commie police state which is why its a failed state. Bob Marley got his wish.

31 posted on 11/19/2009 10:23:37 AM PST by Deb (Beat him, strip him and bring him to my tent!)
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To: SeekAndFind
But despite the importance of the entrepreneurial environment, in many cases government officials hand out money without thinking about other barriers that entrepreneurs face

Been thinking about this a lot lately. What do Entrepreneurs want? FREEDOM................
32 posted on 11/19/2009 10:27:44 AM PST by PeterPrinciple ( Seeking the truth here folks.)
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To: SeekAndFind

Great article, but they have omitted one of the really critical factors of S’pore’s success: PROPERTY RIGHTS.

In biotech, they want low costs but fear locating in the PRC —why? Because patent laws in China are WEAK; if you locate there, your precious secret new stuff will be stolen in a jiffy, and the Chinese cops will laugh at you, and see YOU as the trouble-maker.

Not so in Singapore —the cops will listen to you, and their courts will prosecute a copycat. They want you to tell that story to your rich, greedy friends so that they, too, will locate in Singapore.

See?

PROPERTY RIGHTS.


33 posted on 11/19/2009 7:41:36 PM PST by gaijin
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To: Deb
Yes, I lived and worked there for several years. Did you?

-Conscription
-No free speech
-State controlled news papers
-Cannot talk about other religions in a negative
-State controlled business
-Limited private property, controlled by Gov’t
-Cannot be a member of a secret society-Masons
-Cannot own a firearm
etc.

Yeah, it's a police state, or a Fascist wet dream.

34 posted on 11/20/2009 8:24:30 AM PST by BGHater ("real price of every thing ... is the toil and trouble of acquiring it")
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To: SeekAndFind

Talk about using occam’s butterknife! Compare the cognitive ability of the populations.

Rindermann, H. (2007b). The big G-factor of national cognitive ability (author‘s response on open peer commentary). European Journal of Personality, 21, 767-787.

Rindermann, H. (2008a). Relevance of education and intelligence at the national level for the economic welfare of people. Intelligence, 36, 127-142.

Rindermann, H. (2008b). Relevance of education and intelligence for the political development of nations: Democracy, rule of law and political liberty. Intelligence, 36, 306-322.


35 posted on 11/23/2009 3:04:48 PM PST by Bob017
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To: gaijin

At the macro-social level cognitive competence is more important than economic liberty for the economic growth of nations (Rindermann, 2008a) and it is more important than wealth for the democratic development of countries (Rindermann, 2008b). And intelligence seems to be a sensible measure of development up to indicating failing societies.

Rindermann, H. (2008a). Relevance of education and intelligence at the national level for the economic welfare of people. Intelligence, 36, 127-142.

Rindermann, H. (2008b). Relevance of education and intelligence for the political development of nations: Democracy, rule of law and political liberty. Intelligence, 36, 306-322.


36 posted on 11/23/2009 3:05:40 PM PST by Bob017
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