Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Barack Obama Canít Protect You from a Nuclear Attack. This Card Might.
IsraPundit ^ | 12/23/09 | Bill Levinson

Posted on 12/24/2009 11:09:10 AM PST by Winged Hussar

From Physicians for Civil Defense, "American Lives: Two for a Penny." The following is a wallet card that costs about half a cent, and the information it contains can mean the difference between life and death if Iran gives terrorists a nuclear weapon to detonate in an American city. Note that the cost to provide this card to every American ($1.5 million) is probably less than Barack Obama spent on his recent junket to Copenhagen. With regard to copyright, the accompanying letter says, "The enclosed yellow card offers a half-penny antidote: copy and disseminate."

Our knowledge of civil defense corroborates the above information, such as the 7/10 rule. In addition, it is extremely important to protect yourself from the heat from the weapon. Light-colored materials provide considerable protection, as shown by burn patterns on people from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Dark clothing resulted in serious burns while light-colored portions of the same clothing covered minor burns or uninjured skin.

(Excerpt) Read more at israpundit.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: billlevinson; iran; nuclear; nukes; obama
    60 Second Nuclear Detonation Training for First Responders

    A. Drop and COVER when you see a flash. Stay down behind cover for two full minutes. Even covering with a newspaper can prevent burns. Keep eyes closed during bright light to prevent blindness.

    B. 7/10 rule. Fallout loses 90% of its radioactivity in the first 7 hours after a detonation an an additional 90% for every 7-fold increase in time: 90% in the first seven hours; 99% in 49 hours (two days) and 99.9% in two weeks.

    C. Fallout looks like sand, ash, or grit as it falls and accumulates on the ground. If no fallout is visible on ground, there is no radiation! To be sure, place a piece of white paper, a dinner plate or anything with a smooth surface on the ground & check every 15 minutes for fallout particles. If visual indications of fallout appear take shelter for two or three days underground or behind thick walls. (These tips are generally true.)

    This card may be the only nuclear training you get. Knowing A, B, & C, can protect your life and your department. Give a card to each emergency responder in your jurisdiction.

    These principles were developed during nuclear weapons tests from the 1940s-1960s and remain valid today! The laws of physics do not change.

    This card by: PhysiciansForCivilDefense.org.


1 posted on 12/24/2009 11:09:12 AM PST by Winged Hussar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar

If no fallout is visible on ground, there is no radiation!

Flat out lie. Radioactive Iodine can and most likely will be airborne. And it’s not the only byproduct that can exist in the air.


2 posted on 12/24/2009 11:14:01 AM PST by djf (Invest now! Buy paper! Earn interest! That's more paper!! (A little soy sauce and you CAN eat it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar
boxcar2
3 posted on 12/24/2009 11:16:12 AM PST by Nateman (If liberals aren't screaming you're doing it wrong.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

The card seems to match what FEMA has to say:

http://www.fema.gov/areyouready/nuclear_blast.shtm
“However, any increase in surface build-up of gritty dust and dirt should be a warning for taking protective measures.”


4 posted on 12/24/2009 11:18:28 AM PST by Winged Hussar (http://moveonpleasemoveon.blogspot.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: djf

Strontium 90 too. It’s got a half-life of 29 years.


5 posted on 12/24/2009 11:19:45 AM PST by CholeraJoe (My baloney has a first name, it's B-A-R-A-K. My baloney has a second name, it's O-B-A-M-A)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar

6 posted on 12/24/2009 11:20:35 AM PST by Domandred (Fdisk, format, and reinstall the entire .gov system.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf; CholeraJoe
I think these issues apply only to direct radiation.

“Direct radiation occurs at the time of the explosion. It can be very intense, but its range is limited. For large nuclear weapons, the range of intense direct radiation is less than the range of lethal blast and thermal radiation effects. However, in the case of smaller weapons, direct radiation may be the lethal effect with the greatest range...

...Fallout radiation is received from particles that are made radioactive by the effects of the explosion, and subsequently distributed at varying distances from the site of the blast. “

http://www.skeptically.org/onwars/id22.html

I believe that if you are far enough away from ground zero to survive the blast, then the dangers of radiation are largely due to fallout, not direct radiation in the air around you.

7 posted on 12/24/2009 11:27:17 AM PST by SoCal Pubbie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar

The purpose of this card and its half true information is to placate the population, give us a false sense of security, and protect our government Royalty from an irate, rioting citizenry until they can fly themselves and their families to safe havens where they will receive the best protection and medical care.

By the time we start dying our slow miserable deaths and the realization of how they have lied to gain advantage for themselves sets in, they will have removed themselves from harm and secured their own safety.


8 posted on 12/24/2009 11:30:40 AM PST by Iron Munro (God is great - Beer is good - People are crazy.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CholeraJoe

Thing is, iodine, by it’s very nature, is kinda borderline. If you take iodine crystals and set them on your counter, in a few days, they will be gone.

The same way ice cubes can disappear from your freezer. Sublimation.


9 posted on 12/24/2009 11:30:51 AM PST by djf (Invest now! Buy paper! Earn interest! That's more paper!! (A little soy sauce and you CAN eat it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: djf; SoCal Pubbie

Strontium 90 mimics calcium when ingested. It is incorporated into bones. I’m certain I had Strontium 90 in my skeleton from atmospheric tests back in the 50’s. After Chernobyl there were a number of cases of thyroid cancer downwind due to the I 131 released.


10 posted on 12/24/2009 11:38:42 AM PST by CholeraJoe (My baloney has a first name, it's B-A-R-A-K. My baloney has a second name, it's O-B-A-M-A)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: djf

My father built an underground fall-out shelter for us in the early 60’s. He’s since sold the property. I wish he still had it.


11 posted on 12/24/2009 11:40:49 AM PST by bannie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: djf

They should have added something along the lines of, “When you cells cease to grow due to the damage to the nucleus , and the first couple layers of your colon walls are passed in a bloody mess, you should make sure your will is up to date. And wash your hands.”


12 posted on 12/24/2009 11:41:52 AM PST by Vermont Lt (I have lived here all my life, and now is the first time I am ashamed of my country)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: CholeraJoe

Yup.

And I’m sure an air blast can end up creating some C-14, a radioactive isotope of carbon.

The only thing I’m contesting here is somebody making a statement like unless you see piles of fallout, there is no radiation... that is simply not true, and might lead people to a false sense of security.


13 posted on 12/24/2009 11:42:32 AM PST by djf (Invest now! Buy paper! Earn interest! That's more paper!! (A little soy sauce and you CAN eat it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: djf

You and I are on the same page. I 131 and Sr 90 can occur in dangerous quantities without visible fallout.


14 posted on 12/24/2009 11:47:02 AM PST by CholeraJoe (My baloney has a first name, it's B-A-R-A-K. My baloney has a second name, it's O-B-A-M-A)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Iron Munro

Re:”The purpose of this card and its half true information is to placate the population, give us a false sense of security, and protect our government Royalty from an irate, rioting citizenry until they can fly themselves and their families to safe havens where they will receive the best protection and medical care.”

The card is not from the government, it is from an organization that thinks very poorly of Obama.


15 posted on 12/24/2009 11:50:44 AM PST by Winged Hussar (http://moveonpleasemoveon.blogspot.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: bannie

I know what you mean. My next house will have one and a large pantry.


16 posted on 12/24/2009 11:54:45 AM PST by 2001convSVT ("Only Property Owners that pay taxes should have the right to Vote")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: All

http://www.nukepills.com/docs/nuclear_war_survival_skills.pdf


17 posted on 12/24/2009 11:56:02 AM PST by NYFreeper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: CholeraJoe
"I’m certain I had Strontium 90 in my skeleton from atmospheric tests for the entire decade of the 50's. After Chernobyl there were a number of cases of thyroid cancer downwind due to the I 131 released."

I was downwind, as was everybody in our town, in Utah in the 50's. We used to get iodine tablets in school every month. Chocolate flavored. They claimed it was because we lived so far from the ocean and weren't getting enough iodine from fish. ...right...

18 posted on 12/24/2009 12:00:49 PM PST by redhead (Redhead: That's me: Shovel ready, with the bullseye already on my back.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar
While that might work for a lower-yield weapon, the scary part is that if we get involved in nuclear war with Russia or China the bombs landing will have yields at least in the 200 kT to 500 kT range. In that case, if you're within a few miles of Ground Zero, you won't survive because the heat pulse, radiation pulse and blast wave from a thermonuclear weapon is MUCH bigger, to say the least.

(Indeed, I'll cite the example of San Francisco as Ground Zero. A 500 kT nuclear warhead detonated about 2 km over the Financial District in San Francisco would have such a strong heat and radiation pulse that even if you're standing on the Berkeley Marina or the shoreline of Sausalito several miles away you'll be dead within seconds from the pulse of 5,000-plus degree heat, if not from the enormous amount of radiation hitting you.)

19 posted on 12/24/2009 12:03:55 PM PST by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: redhead

Iodine deficiency is almost unheard of these days, due to iodized salt.

But it can be a crippling and life threatening condition. The average person, in their entire adult lifespan, only needs about the equivalent of a tablespoon full.

I always have it around, and would recommend everybody else does also. In the event of an air burst anywheres on the globe, if you don’t have any KI tabs, you can paint a small quarter sized circle of tincture of iodine on your belly and you will be OK.

And iodine solution is a good disinfectant for water. A drop or two per quart.


20 posted on 12/24/2009 12:08:28 PM PST by djf (Invest now! Buy paper! Earn interest! That's more paper!! (A little soy sauce and you CAN eat it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: 2001convSVT
I think that most people in the Midwest have basements. There just aren't any out here on the left coast. It would be a good idea to reinforce them and add the necessary stuff to make them fallout proof.
21 posted on 12/24/2009 12:12:06 PM PST by bannie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: djf

It’s not a lie. Nuclear detonations do not as a rule produce appreciable amounts of more than a limited number of elemental isotopes that are of direct concern in fallout. Iodine-131 and Strontium-90, while produced, are so uncommon that for humans to get appreciable amounts of either, they must land on plants, that are eaten by cows, who secrete more concentrated amounts in their milk.

Chernobyl did generate large amounts, producing isotopes of both iodine and cesium, both of which are very hazardous, in such quantity that people could uptake enough to do them harm.

So as far as risk assessment goes, if you can stay out of the fallout for two weeks, the hazard from fallout will be so low that you can pay attention to your more immediate problems, which can be just as deadly, after a nuclear detonation.


22 posted on 12/24/2009 12:19:25 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Some of the things we are talking about are lethal in the billionths of a gram range, like plutonium.

If you want to believe that because there is no dust, you are all safe and sound, that’s OK.

That’s one of the reasons I have bottled water and am not going to try to depend on water filters, at least for the first few weeks.


23 posted on 12/24/2009 12:46:55 PM PST by djf (Invest now! Buy paper! Earn interest! That's more paper!! (A little soy sauce and you CAN eat it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

“Chernobyl did generate large amounts, producing isotopes of both iodine and cesium, both of which are very hazardous, in such quantity that people could uptake enough to do them harm.”

Chernobyl was a reactor meltdown and not a nuclear explosion; it was probably a lot dirtier than a nuke.


24 posted on 12/24/2009 1:53:43 PM PST by Winged Hussar (http://moveonpleasemoveon.blogspot.com/)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: djf

I can’t find any iodine for sale.

I thought it had been pulled from the market. I keep the Polar Pure stuff just for this reason.


25 posted on 12/24/2009 2:34:54 PM PST by ASOC (In case of attack, tune to 640 kilocycles or 1240 kilocycles on your AM dial.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: ASOC

Go to your local farm supply.


26 posted on 12/24/2009 3:02:24 PM PST by djf (Invest now! Buy paper! Earn interest! That's more paper!! (A little soy sauce and you CAN eat it!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar; All
Maybe it's time to dust off this ancient post of mine:

Nuclear, Biological, & Chemical Warfare- Survival Skills, Pt. II

27 posted on 12/24/2009 3:10:40 PM PST by backhoe (All Across America, the Lights are being relit again...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar
In view of all this discussion of fallout, let me suggest we look at the civilian population of Kazakhstan, host to 116 above-ground nuclear tests at the Semipalatinsk test site.

Quoting from an article in the Boston Globe ...”the total number affected is thought to be more than one million”... (while I don't have any hard data, I am guessing that this is less than 10% of the total population that has lived in the area over the last 50+ years. I might also point out that in the case of the U.S. downwinders, while the overall cancer rate in the areas closest to the test site, they were statistically indistinguishable from cancers from smoking and other environmental causes. In addition, in the case of Kazakhstan, cancer was only a small part of a whole host of maladies brought on by the repeated nuclear testing) ...”health problems ranging from thyroid diseases, cancer, birth defects, deformities, premature aging, and cardiovascular diseases.”...

As bad as this sounds, consider the implications of the next sentence. “Life expectancy in the area is seven years less than the national average of Kazakhstan.” This population got nuked 106 times & yet, while a large number of the population is doomed to suffer with horrible, chronic illnesses, the scenario of masses of people dying of radiation exposure did not play out here.

Warning - Graphic pictures accompany article -

http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2009/11/kazakhstans_radioactive_legacy.html

I might add that an EMP attack has a far greater potential of causing mass casualties. some projections are of up to 90% of U.S. citizens dead within a year of the attack. from the total loss of infrastructure. The one thing the Kazakhs had going for them was access to continuing medical care, even at the primitive level of the Soviet Union.

Oh well. Merry Christmas, everybody!.

28 posted on 12/24/2009 4:23:42 PM PST by ADemocratNoMore (Jeepers, Freepers, where'd 'ya get those sleepers?. Pj people, exposing old media's lies.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: djf

“Plutonium is more dangerous when inhaled than when ingested. The risk of lung cancer increases once the total dose equivalent of inhaled radiation exceeds 400 mSv (40 rem). The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that the lifetime cancer risk for inhaling 5,000 plutonium particles, each about 3 microns wide, to be 1% over the background U.S. average. It is not absorbed into the body efficiently when ingested; only 0.04% of plutonium oxide is absorbed after ingestion.”

“Atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, generated most environmental plutonium. About 10,000kg were released into the atmosphere during these tests. Average plutonium levels in surface soils from these tests range from .01 to .1 picocurie per gram. Accidents and production releases have caused greater local contamination.”


29 posted on 12/24/2009 5:29:43 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: Winged Hussar

Yes indeed. However, the Russians have mastered the art of incredibly awful nuclear disasters. From dumping expired nuclear reactors and hundreds of curies of nuclear material in the Arctic Ocean, to Russia’s equivalent of Hanford dumping huge amounts of radioactive materials and toxic chemicals into the headwaters of a major river, “Russians make no mistakes but the very worst.”

But even by Russian standards, the Ural Mountain disaster leaves the others in the dust. It began as a reasonably good idea.

Store high grade nuclear waste in a stable, abandoned salt mine in the Ural Mountains. Punch vent holes in the rock, emplace monitoring equipment, then seal the door with a thick concrete plug.

At first, things went well. But then Kremlin bureaucrats decided that it was expensive to set up such a waste disposal site, so once it was at 100% capacity, they ordered that more waste would continue to be added. Finally, when it was overstuffed, the concrete plug was emplaced, but no vent holes or expensive monitoring equipment was done. Then they left.

It is now estimated that by the end of just one month, the internal temperature of the salt mine exceeded the temperature on the surface of the Sun. A US satellite traveling overhead pictured what looked like a nuclear weapon going off. It blew the top of the mountain off. We were perplexed.

Only years later, a physicist unrelated to the accident was driving through the area, when a roadside sign ordered that all vehicles were to close their windows until further notice. He then went from a lush, forested area, into a dead zone with no living things. The zone of death lasted for 40 miles. Then another sign advised that windows could now be opened.

Such devastation could only happen with the multitude of isotopes found in high grade nuclear waste. And it will remain that way for tens of thousands of years. The physicist was allowed to travel, and on one such opportunity, spilled the beans.

Only just before the Soviet Union fell did they confess to it, and several other horrific and terrible accidents, of which they had plenty.


30 posted on 12/24/2009 5:53:08 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: yefragetuwrabrumuy
Fascinating stuff. And, as with most things, there is an idiot lesson and a smart-person lesson to be learned.

The idiot lesson is "nuclear energy is bad."

The smart-person lesson is "Communism is bad."

31 posted on 12/24/2009 6:01:27 PM PST by denydenydeny (The Left sees taxpayers the way Dr Frankenstein saw the local cemetery; raw material for experiments)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Thanks for that one. I had not heard of the Ural incident; I am, however, familiar with some Soviet nuclear submarine incidents (all the result of poor construction and/or reactor system designs).


32 posted on 12/24/2009 7:03:04 PM PST by Army Air Corps (Four fried chickens and a coke)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: ASOC

I just checked. (and got some more)

Rite-Aid has tincture of iodine, 3.99 for 2 fl ozs.


33 posted on 01/02/2010 4:28:24 PM PST by djf (What has killed more people? 1) Guns in cars or 2) Cell phones in cars???? Do the math!!!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: djf

Thanks! Thanks good news

The bad news is - If we had a Rite-Aid in Alaska, I would buy some. We don’t. Walgreens?

Do they sell over the web?


34 posted on 01/02/2010 4:31:32 PM PST by ASOC (In case of attack, tune to 640 kilocycles or 1240 kilocycles on your AM dial.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson