Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Stimulus Money Helping Richer Tribes(Nationwide, $3 billion in Federal Grants)
The Spokesman-Review ^ | December 14, 2009 | Rob Carson

Posted on 01/09/2010 7:42:21 AM PST by Son House

TACOMA – Nationwide, $3 billion in federal grants, contracts and loans has been set aside for 564 federally recognized tribes in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. As a whole, Northwest tribes are faring better than most as the money filters down from federal agencies.

However, a News Tribune analysis of the money allocated so far shows that the stimulus funds are not helping all tribes in the state equally. On the contrary, the stimulus is widening the gap between rich and poor tribes created by the relative success of their casinos.

Of the $94 million awarded to Washington’s 29 Indian tribes so far, $51 million has gone to five tribes, all among the state’s wealthiest.

Two South Sound tribes, the Nisqually and the Puyallup, are among the big winners.

As of Sept. 30, the most recent date for which totals are available, the Puyallup tribe had received $13.1 million and the Nisqually tribe $12.3 million, money earmarked for dozens of projects ranging from housing and energy conservation to education, roads and law enforcement.

The Yakama Nation, the Tulalip tribes and Lummi Nation, all of which have large, profitable casinos and diversified economies, also are winners.

Meanwhile, the state’s less fortunate tribes so far have received comparatively little.

The Hoh tribe on the Olympic Peninsula, where unemployment exceeds 50 percent and which is struggling to relocate itself out of a flood plain, has received about $300,000 for a contract with the federal Department of Energy to install solar panels on its tribal administration building, preparatory work for a housing project and roadwork through the Bureau of Indian Affairs.

The chronically poor Shoalwater Bay tribe in Tokeland, about 80 miles west of Olympia, has received less than $150,000: $50,000 to disseminate an endangered beach plant called pink sand-verbena, and a $96,253 grant to connect sewer and water lines to a tribal housing project.

“What happens with smaller tribes is we just don’t have the infrastructure to respond to grants,” said Alexis Barry, executive director of the Hoh tribe. “The big tribes have grant writers, and they can jump on that stuff,” Barry said. “It’s very difficult for us – not that we don’t wish them well.”

And a tribe’s political connections have little or nothing to do with its success in getting stimulus funds, said Emmett O’Connell, with the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission.

“It may look like that,” he said, “but what you’ll find is that the money is going to the tribes with capacity. A lot of the stimulus money, at least in the beginning, needed to go to shovel-ready projects. Tribes either had a project or they didn’t.”


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: money; richer; stimulus; tribes
sovereignty
(redirected from Sovereign nation)

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/Sovereign+nation

The supreme, absolute, and uncontrollable power by which an independent state is governed and from which all specific political powers are derived; the intentional independence of a state, combined with the right and power of regulating its internal affairs without foreign interference.

Sovereignty is the power of a state to do everything necessary to govern itself, such as making, executing, and applying laws; imposing and collecting taxes; making war and peace; and forming treaties or engaging in commerce with foreign nations.

The individual states of the United States do not possess the powers of external sovereignty, such as the right to deport undesirable persons, but each does have certain attributes of internal sovereignty, such as the power to regulate the acquisition and transfer of property within its borders. The sovereignty of a state is determined with reference to the U.S. Constitution, which is the supreme law of the land.


1 posted on 01/09/2010 7:42:24 AM PST by Son House
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Son House

Dec 28, 2009

A Stimulating Year

http://www.indiancountrytoday.com/national/80217182.html

The bill also wiped out most of the current IRS restrictions on the ability of tribes to issue tax-exempt bonds.


2 posted on 01/09/2010 7:52:56 AM PST by Son House (The Learning Curve for Democrats on Macroeconomics is getting Exponential)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Son House
The richer tribes can probably spend more on lobbying Congress.
3 posted on 01/09/2010 7:56:54 AM PST by Montfort ("Remember: The issue is never the issue. The issue is control." -- Kazooskibum)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Montfort

They probably got rich off of government grants. They got the grants by contributing money to the politicians that authorized the grants. At what point does it become evident that it’s an exercise in money laundering?


4 posted on 01/09/2010 8:02:16 AM PST by tacticalogic ("Oh bother!" said Pooh, as he chambered his last round.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Son House

Jobs creation: An inexact science
STIMULUS: Statistics reported differently from tribe to tribe

http://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/story/992106.html#ixzz0c8BvwUL9

In it, Washington tribes reported that 358.68 jobs had been created by the distribution of about $94 million in stimulus funds as of Sept. 30.

^
$94,000,000/358.68 jobs = $262,072.04 per Job


5 posted on 01/09/2010 8:03:03 AM PST by Son House (The Learning Curve for Democrats on Macroeconomics is getting Exponential)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: tacticalogic
They probably got rich off of government grants. They got the grants by contributing money to the politicians that authorized the grants. At what point does it become evident that it’s an exercise in money laundering?

...or just buying extra votes. It’s easier to have 150% voting and to find “extra” boxes of ballots on Indian Reservations.

Isn’t that what happened in NM?

6 posted on 01/09/2010 8:30:04 AM PST by az_gila (AZ - one Governor down... we don't want her back...)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson