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A Seed Shortage May Come In 2010
Chronicle.com ^ | 1-11-2010 | SUSAN REIMER

Posted on 01/14/2010 10:58:57 PM PST by blam

A Seed Shortage May Come In 2010

By SUSAN REIMER THE BALTIMORE SUN
Jan. 11, 2010, 10:39AM

Will there be a shortage of vegetable seeds for gardeners in 2010?

It is possible, says Barbara Melera, owner of the oldest seed house in the country, D. Landreth Seeds, formerly of Baltimore and now of New Freedom, Pa.

After back-to-back good years — 2008's salmonella scares and 2009's poor economy send homeowners into the garden to grow their own food — you might expect a backslide in seed sales, Melera said. New gardeners get discouraged or bored.

But, she said, “In 2009, we had the worst growing season in 50 years.” Rain and disease destroyed crops and with them, the seeds for next year's garden.

“Onion sets. And a cucumber seed shortage,” she predicted. “We are being told that the cucumber harvest was catastrophic, attacked late in the season by woolly mildew. There was fruit, but no viable seeds inside.

“We are being told that many, many varieties simply won't be available.”

Likewise, Europe had a terrible harvest this year, and Europeans purchased much of their produce from the United States, taking with it the seeds.

And, as further proof that we are in a global marketplace, Europeans and Australians have taken a fancy to eating sprouts — tons of sprouts.

“When you grow vegetables just to get the sprouts, nothing gets to fruit. And they are consuming gigantic quantities of seeds just for the purpose of sprouts.”

Word of possible shortages must be leaking out, Melera said, because retailers are telling her they had their best December in years.

It is certainly true that vegetable gardeners are ordering seeds earlier and earlier, but Melera said she thinks it is more likely that gardeners are acting out of fear

[snip]

(Excerpt) Read more at chron.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: gardens; plants; seeds; shortage

1 posted on 01/14/2010 10:58:59 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

real headline grabber ain’t it?


2 posted on 01/14/2010 11:06:33 PM PST by MissDairyGoodnessVT (Free Nobel Peace Prize with oil change =^..^=)
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To: FromLori; GeronL; The Comedian; djf; hennie pennie; OB1kNOb; autumnraine
Global Food Crisis 2010 Means Financial Armageddon
3 posted on 01/14/2010 11:09:39 PM PST by blam
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To: blam

btrl


4 posted on 01/14/2010 11:15:30 PM PST by TigersEye (It's the Marxism, stupid!)
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To: MissDairyGoodnessVT

I’ve been storing food. Probably should start buying some more. And any seeds that come out for sale, quess I should be buying those, too.


5 posted on 01/14/2010 11:16:27 PM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
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To: artichokegrower
Farm Bureau Says New Energy Policy Will Harm Farmers

Rush talked about this Salazar change on his radio program Thursday.

He said it will greatly affect the small oil companies and hurt us all.
Then Rush said: "It's got to be a deliberate attempt to destroy the country."

6 posted on 01/14/2010 11:20:03 PM PST by blam
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To: SatinDoll

I have problems w/this because..........
YES, you need to take care of your needs forpresent& the future but to me the headline is fear-mongering,because there are those who do not understand this and even worse live in Baltimore City (Susan Reimer,columnist,Balto.Sun)who have absolutely NO ACCESS to storing up .3/4’s of Balto City is on frikkin’ food stamps.


7 posted on 01/14/2010 11:21:39 PM PST by MissDairyGoodnessVT (Free Nobel Peace Prize with oil change =^..^=)
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To: SatinDoll

I do the food storage but I also have my garden seeds for the most part for the garden coming up. Last year early on I tried to order from one online company and they were out. I have never seen that before.

I also prefer open pollinated seeds- meaning I can save seed from year to year, which can not be done with hybrids. That plus I grew up with open pollinated and to me the taste is so much better with things like tomatoes and such.


8 posted on 01/14/2010 11:25:13 PM PST by handmade
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To: blam

Thnx.

I try to save the seeds from what I grow. Some are hard because it’s alot of work to get and decent number of seeds from the pod, like radishes. Others are easier, squash, onions, cabbage.

I had one carrot plant last year that must have really really liked where it was, because it ended up putting out about 25 seed heads. Probably got 5,000 carrot seeds from that one plant!!

Spinach, beets, and lettuce too!


9 posted on 01/14/2010 11:29:23 PM PST by djf (2010 in review: A handfull of Wall Street banks got way more help than Haiti!!!)
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To: MissDairyGoodnessVT
Susan is just reporting what Barbara Melera, owner of the oldest seed house in the country said.

Presumably, their seeds are sold nationwide...this article from Baltimore was picked up by the Houston Chronicle.

10 posted on 01/14/2010 11:29:24 PM PST by blam
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To: handmade

Plus, if you plant seeds you have previously grown and harvested, you have a much better chance that it is a variety that will do well where you are!

Sometimes I go into my garden and think I gotta beat the cabbage back with a stick!!
I leave them overwinter and die back a bit. Then, in the spring, they start to put out tons of new leaves and stems prior to flowering.

A new cabbage leaf in the spring like that has got almost as much sugar in it as a pear, I swear! Delicious!


11 posted on 01/14/2010 11:35:13 PM PST by djf (2010 in review: A handfull of Wall Street banks got way more help than Haiti!!!)
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To: blam

Guns, loaded ammo, powder, primers, bullets, and now seed? Some kind of trend?


12 posted on 01/14/2010 11:38:46 PM PST by matthew fuller (What we do in November will echo in eternity!)
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To: matthew fuller
Guns, loaded ammo, powder, primers, bullets, and now seed?

And next, water.

13 posted on 01/15/2010 12:05:56 AM PST by UCANSEE2
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To: blam

This is a GREAT website- (can’t say that I have ever traded with them), but they have all sorts of survivalist stuff, including seeds, and tons of info.: http://waltonfeed.com/category/70


14 posted on 01/15/2010 12:33:42 AM PST by matthew fuller (What we do in November will echo in eternity!)
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To: blam

I guess we’ve been pushin’ too hard.


15 posted on 01/15/2010 4:28:20 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: blam

Consuming vast quantities of sprouts sounds like a liberal thing.


16 posted on 01/15/2010 4:34:21 AM PST by BuffaloJack (Hoax and Chains is not the same as hope and change.)
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To: matthew fuller

I have a small garden here in Maine. Enough to feed three, and some to sell or trade to neighbors.

I am finishing up my seed purchases this week; because last year in Feb. I ran into shortages.

As more and more seed companies are being bought and destroyed by Monsanto and Dupont, even retail seeds varieties are becoming hard to find.

What will happen in your area when it becomes too expensive to ship food to your area ?

When a loaf bread costs ten dollars, food stamps aren’t going to last through the first week of any given month? Do you think the nice people in the projects are going to give up their potato ships and ding-dongs ?

If you can; grow your own-store your own.

I have re-named my victory garden to;

.........THE JOHN GALT MEMMORIAL GARDEN......


17 posted on 01/15/2010 4:37:08 AM PST by maine yankee
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To: blam

Don’t we have a bunch of seeds stored in Norway?


18 posted on 01/15/2010 4:48:07 AM PST by DaveArk
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To: DaveArk
"Don’t we have a bunch of seeds stored in Norway?"

Yup.

Norway Marks Seed Vault Opening

19 posted on 01/15/2010 5:24:01 AM PST by blam
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To: DaveArk; blam

Yes, there are seed banks around the world and many in the USA, too.

There isn’t a shortage of seeds. I work for a seed company. Granted, some years there are shortages of a particular VARIETY, but we’re not going to run out of seed as long as there are people (like me) who are making money at it.

As far as SAVING seed, you need to grow open-or-self-pollinating varieties, usually called ‘Heirloom Seed.’ You also need isolation cages or acres and acres of land between varieties so you don’t get cross-pollinization.

Hybridized seeds will not produce TRUE, but they still will produce...either the male or female cross of the plant the seed came from in the first place.

See sales last year were up 30%. I predict more of the same this year...and yes, it was the worst growing season I’ve seen in 20 years...but people were still able to produce some of their food around here.

Don’t panic. Stock up if that’s where you want your dollars to sit, but there’s no need to panic.


20 posted on 01/15/2010 5:24:32 AM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Pushing Too Hard
(The Seeds)
21 posted on 01/15/2010 5:26:47 AM PST by blam
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
"There isn’t a shortage of seeds. I work for a seed company. Granted, some years there are shortages of a particular VARIETY, but we’re not going to run out of seed as long as there are people (like me) who are making money at it."

Thanks for the informed/educated input.

Did you see the article about the 4,000 year old bean seeds that sprouted?

22 posted on 01/15/2010 5:32:47 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

Yes, I did. Nature always wins in the end. We live. We die. And in-between we garden. :)


23 posted on 01/15/2010 6:25:01 AM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (Save the Earth. It's the only planet with chocolate.)
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To: blam; All

Thanks for the ping I’m a bit behind on news lately that article has excellent information and links. With the severity of the weather and seed shortages, etc. at best we will see skyrocketing prices.

There is also BO’s other stupid plan in the works to take farmland and plant trees to consider.

http://thecomingdepression.net/main-street/poverty/forests-instead-of-food/

and Oil is rising which will drive up the costs as well. I hope you all prepare stock up as much as you can.


24 posted on 01/15/2010 7:22:59 AM PST by FromLori (FromLori)
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To: FromLori
"I hope you all prepare stock up as much as you can."

Yes, have done so except for gasoline. I normally store 55-110 gallons of gasoline for hurricane season...I will be doing this next week.
Yes, I use Sta-bil, stabilizer.

25 posted on 01/15/2010 8:15:26 AM PST by blam
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To: blam

Jim Rogers: Brace Yourself For Food Shortages, Thanks To The Banks Hoarding Cash

http://www.businessinsider.com/jim-rogers-buy-ahead-of-the-food-shortages-2010-1


26 posted on 01/15/2010 9:08:36 AM PST by FromLori (FromLori)
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To: blam; All
My two favorite sources of heirloom seeds are shown below. Heirlooms are the only type we try to use, because if we have to save our own seeds (which we do now) heirlooms will come back true to type.

One of the keys to saving seeds is to save types that will thrive in your climate, whether your growing season is short and coolish, or long, hot, and humid.

Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds

Seed Savers Exchange

27 posted on 01/15/2010 9:44:02 AM PST by OB1kNOb (Q: What's the difference between Obama and his dog, Bo? A: Bo has papers.)
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To: MissDairyGoodnessVT

What I’ve stored is primarily grains such as hard red wheat, tricale, rye, brown rice, and barley which I have bought from bulk bins. Dry beans goes well with grains and the amino acids are complimentary, meaning the total protein content of both are better utilyzed by the body. Milk also boosts the available and usable protein of grains and legumes, and it can be stored in dry form.

None of these items have to be purchased in huge lots. I buy an extra few pounds of two or three items every month from the bins in a special section of my supermarket - very economical. The items are stored in large plastic buckets with snap on lids that originally contained kitty litter.

Purchasing a few extra cans of canned chicken, salmon, or beef when they are on sale, and cans of tomatoes, eventually adds up.

It is possible to do this with food stamps. There are online sites that can offer advice on this but most of it is common sense.


28 posted on 01/15/2010 9:58:03 AM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
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To: blam

It’s good to be appreciated in my own time. ;’)


29 posted on 01/15/2010 10:03:03 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: SatinDoll; SunkenCiv; blam
>>>> "...large plastic buckets with snap on lids that originally contained kitty litter." <<<<

Are you positive that this is safe?

I'm certain that I've read many times that one is ONLY supposed to use food grade plastic buckets for any type of food storage, much less the long term variety.

That's why lots of people ask bakeries to safe the big buckets that frosting comes in.

It is safe to re-use, because it is FOOD GRADE.

30 posted on 01/15/2010 2:24:56 PM PST by hennie pennie
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To: hennie pennie

I”ve read online that brand new food grade plastic buckets are very inexpensive at Home Depot and Lowes.


31 posted on 01/15/2010 2:26:14 PM PST by hennie pennie
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To: blam

Bump.
Link entered in the survival thread.


32 posted on 01/15/2010 3:01:11 PM PST by nw_arizona_granny ( http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/21813ht92/posts?page=1 [Survival,food,garden,crafts,and more)
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To: matthew fuller

This is a GREAT website- (can’t say that I have ever traded with them), but they have all sorts of survivalist stuff, including seeds, and tons of info.: http://waltonfeed.com/category/70

<<<<<<<<<<<<

I have traded with them, several times, as have my friends and many Freepers.

For me they are the only company to do business with, they spoiled me for the common supplier.

The product is fresh and it is priced for the common man.

I can buy from them, have UPS deliver it to my living room and still beat the local market prices in Kingman Arizona.

That is on the larger orders, would not be true for a single item.

I buy bags of grains/flour/beans/sugar etc and also the dehydrated canned products.


33 posted on 01/15/2010 3:05:41 PM PST by nw_arizona_granny ( http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/chat/21813ht92/posts?page=1 [Survival,food,garden,crafts,and more)
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To: nw_arizona_granny

Thanks for the endorsement. I have a friend asking me for this sort of advice. Now, I won’t hesitate to recommend these people.


34 posted on 01/15/2010 3:15:48 PM PST by blam
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To: hennie pennie

It depends what you put in it.

I have food safe buckets for bulk items such as wheat, rye and triticale. Those buckets have metal bag liners and seal tightly. I purchased them from a food storage specialty company. Items like macaroni and beans bought in plastic bags go in the empty kitty litter buckets because the lids do not fit tightly and the main idea is to protect the items from light and moisture damage, not airtight seal them. Dry milk comes in individual envelopes within boxes - I buy that off the supermarket shelves.

I have steal shelving that keeps the items up off the floor.

My grandparents, who lived through the depression, always had a closet or entire room devoted to food storage. They survived the lean years, so can anyone.


35 posted on 01/15/2010 9:26:36 PM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
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To: SatinDoll
You see, in your original posting you mentioned buying inexpensive bulk items and it read to me like you were putting the inexpensive bulk items in the used kitty litter plastic buckets; bulk items purchased in bulk baskets rarely are well packaged.

Thanks for claritying.

36 posted on 01/16/2010 5:41:12 AM PST by hennie pennie
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To: blam

My pleasure, you will find folks who have ordered from Walton Feed.com, are all quick to say they will again.

Well except for my friend Don, for awhile he was upset that after all the years of ordering from them, his last order was so big, that it came by truck on pallets......LOL and they did not deliver it into his living room, dropped it and said it is all yours now.

He should have read the site, for it is there some place.

Walton has one valuable feature that many miss, on the order page is a link that is for “Read my label”, take time to check it, for it will tell you the vitamins, minerals, etc in the product.

Until I read it, I thought beans were beans....they are all different, some contain more than others.

I found them on the internet, then checked the Mormon food lists and even asked Mormons about them, they order there and that was all I needed to know that it would be safe to deal with them.

I had been warned that all cans of dehydrated foods were not the same.

The real convincer for me, was the sacks of grain and flour come from local mills, you smell the freshness when you open the bag. Beans that I bought 5 and 6 years ago, are still plumper today, than the fresh bulk beans sold in the markets of Kingman.

Check them out, they are not just for storage, most of my purchases from them were to use now, and of course it helps to have some for the feared emergencies.


37 posted on 01/16/2010 4:07:48 PM PST by nw_arizona_granny
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