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Jim Rogers: Brace Yourself For Food Shortages, Thanks To The Banks Hoarding Cash
The Business Insider ^ | 1/15/10 | Vincent Fernando

Posted on 01/15/2010 9:21:42 AM PST by FromLori

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To: lfrancis
Depending upon where you are in Michigan, your crop year may be somewhat shorter than mine.

My principal product is cattle. I generally plant enough corn to feed my own herd plus, give or take an equivalent amount to market for cash, which tends to act as a hedge. Corn following several years of alfalfa or following intensive pasture requires very little anhydrous and is not particularly susceptible to insect or disease because of the long rotation.

51 posted on 01/15/2010 11:06:48 AM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: phormer phrog phlyer

Someone sent me a mail suggesting horse manure. I do have horses around and some barns have large, old piles outside. I need to figure out how I would haul it.


52 posted on 01/15/2010 11:13:16 AM PST by MtnClimber (Be a Patriot, contribute to Free Republic today!)
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To: anonsquared

The article prediciting a 2009 wheat failure proved incorrect. The US crop came in at 2.22 Billion bushels and the price today for near term soft red winter wheat is about $.15 per bushel less than when the article you referenced was written.


53 posted on 01/15/2010 11:18:44 AM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: Mr. Lucky

It may have something to do with the mold disease that went thru the mid-atlantic crops this year that the farmers couldn’t sell. They’re sure not going to plant wheat and go thru that again


54 posted on 01/15/2010 11:19:11 AM PST by conservativesister
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To: Mr. Lucky

Thanks for the info. I don’t think they have found a solution to the rust yet. Hopefully, the solution won’t be worse than the rust.


55 posted on 01/15/2010 11:26:34 AM PST by anonsquared (TEA PARTY 2010 - THROW 'EM ALL IN THE HARBOR!)
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To: anonsquared

The gene the rust works on has apparently been identified, so some evil private corporation like Monsanto or Syngenta will probably develope a resistant strain and then expect to be paid for it (just for saving the world from starvation).


56 posted on 01/15/2010 11:30:44 AM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: MattinNJ

FYI: When I was a kid, our neighbors were from Kansas and knew how to work a farm. They always grew their own veg and used egg shells and coffee grounds as fertilizer.


57 posted on 01/15/2010 1:18:16 PM PST by FreeStateYank (I want my country and constitution back, now!)
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To: FromLori

Is he buying food or pieces of paper that says he is buying food?


58 posted on 01/15/2010 2:50:41 PM PST by redgolum ("God is dead" -- Nietzsche. "Nietzsche is dead" -- God.)
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To: FromLori
UNCLASS
AMERICAN HEARTLAND
PRIORITY/ROUTINE
P R 16:16:55Z16JAN2010
FM: American Producers
TO: NyLon Grocery Clerks
SUBJ: Strong message follows




EOM EOM EOM
59 posted on 01/16/2010 8:22:42 AM PST by LomanBill (Animals! The DemocRats blew up the windmill with an Acorn!)
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To: FreeStateYank
>>knew how to work a farm.

Probably not the only thing they knew how to work...




Boy Scout Camps of America - bringing the skills and values of the American Heartland to the McUrban jungle.
60 posted on 01/16/2010 8:43:11 AM PST by LomanBill (Animals! The DemocRats blew up the windmill with an Acorn!)
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To: MtnClimber

Be careful with manure, it could contain seeds which you do not want. When I was a kid (Indiana), my dad got some horse manure as fertilizer and it had chic weed in it. It just about took over the garden.


61 posted on 01/17/2010 1:37:25 PM PST by phormer phrog phlyer
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To: anonsquared; muawiyah; blam; SunkenCiv; decimon
VERY interesting about the wheat fungus -- did you all know that back some time in the 1990s that former army remote viewer Ed Dames told Art Bell that his team foresaw massive starvation due to a fungal infection - which I think I've read would afflict WHEAT.

Makes me wonder just what the US Army and/or US Gov't happened to know about this fungus way long before it erupted on the world stage?

62 posted on 01/18/2010 6:15:55 AM PST by hennie pennie
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To: hennie pennie

Beginning gardeners, a tip — never plant more than one hill of zucchini.


63 posted on 01/18/2010 8:15:53 AM PST by SunkenCiv (Happy New Year! Freedom is Priceless.)
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To: MtnClimber
I live in the Colorado Rockies so have very rocky and poor soil. I have been composting leaves, pine needles and kitchen scraps to build up the soil in the garden areas.

Rabbit manure is terrific - you can plant straight in it with no need to compost. I had GIGANTIC artichoke plants this past year, planted into straight rabbit manure.

64 posted on 01/18/2010 8:20:37 AM PST by SCalGal (Friends don't let friends donate to H$U$ or PETA.)
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To: MtnClimber

I just put in a 60x20 garden, guess I need to learn how to can food too, damn.


65 posted on 01/18/2010 8:20:53 AM PST by jpsb
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To: SatinDoll

Another tip, do not plant all at once, my mistake, plant once every week or two so that crops come in slowly not all at once.


66 posted on 01/18/2010 8:24:40 AM PST by jpsb
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To: jpsb

I was worried about this when Zero got elected since the leftist dictators have used food shortages to gain control of the people so often in the past. I grew my first garden here in Colorado last year. I will be expanding the garden this year. Planting fruit and nut trees too.


67 posted on 01/18/2010 8:25:38 AM PST by MtnClimber (Be a Patriot, contribute to Free Republic today!)
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To: MtnClimber
Can you buy top soil and put in a raised bed? If so I would do that rather then try to build up the soil. At 4 inches one yard will give you an 8x10 garden. I bought 16 yards of top fill for a 20x60 6 inch raised bed. Then I but 6 yards of compost into it. Total cost was under $450.00, my friends told me $450 would buy a lot of green beans at Krogers. lol, well maybe yes and then again maybe not. But they sure are liking the brocolli, cabbage, brussels sprouts and greens I'm getting out of it right now.

I used to do a small garden here in Texas a few years back but had to start all over since hurricane Ike took all my top soil. Good luck with yours!

68 posted on 01/18/2010 8:40:46 AM PST by jpsb
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To: jpsb

I am basically doing raised beds. I live at 8500 ft elevation in the Colorado Rockies and have a 1 acre forested lot. Mostly pine trees and aspens. I rake up and compost the pine needles and leaves along with kitchen scraps. I am trying to expand by 20’X20’ each year for the next few years.


69 posted on 01/18/2010 8:49:35 AM PST by MtnClimber (Be a Patriot, contribute to Free Republic today!)
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To: opentalk
The agency blames poor weather, low prices and the late row crop harvest for the decrease

That would indicate Rogers is talking out his butt. Low prices are a sign of surplus, not scarcity.

70 posted on 01/18/2010 8:57:22 AM PST by MNJohnnie (Either you are for "we, the people", or against us. There is no middle ground anymore)
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To: MattinNJ

Some of the best gardens in the country are in Jersey. Great tomatoes.


71 posted on 01/21/2010 8:35:14 AM PST by Woebama (Never, never, never quit)
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To: Woebama
Agreed. Nothing like stopping off on one of the back roads and chowing down on some Jersey produce. I live in NW jersey and commute to Princeton. I stay on the back roads and it is every bit as rural and beautiful as parts of Tennessee, Virginia, or Kentucky that I have been to.

I know nothing about gardening, but I think we have great soil because we get a very slow snow melt. Buddy of mine just throws his pumpkins in the backyard and a whole patch comes up the next year-or so he tells me.

72 posted on 01/21/2010 1:47:20 PM PST by MattinNJ (O is going to get his candy ass kicked by a girl. Go Sarah.)
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