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Haitiís real crisis is poverty (Ya THINK?)
The DC ^ | January 21, 2010 | Ian Vasquez

Posted on 01/22/2010 6:25:32 PM PST by Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Haiti’s humanitarian disaster has rightfully elicited an outpouring of support from around the world. But the tragedy should also elicit outrage because the massive destruction, suffering and loss of life were largely avoidable.

Natural disasters, such as hurricanes and floods that have regularly afflicted Haiti, have plagued mankind throughout history. As the world has become wealthier, the ability to cope with such calamities has grown; annual deaths due to such disasters have declined by 96 percent since the 1920s.

Economic growth has made it possible for countries around the world, increasingly including developing nations, to mitigate damage done by “acts of God.” Growth typically brings sturdier construction, insurance schemes, better infrastructure, a more diversified economy, an improved ability to respond to emergencies, access to savings and credit, and so on. Unfortunately, growth has bypassed Haiti. Despite receiving more than $8.4 billion in foreign aid since 1980, Haiti is poorer today than it was 30 years ago.

Haiti’s poverty—80 percent of Haitians live on less than $2 per day—is especially tragic given the strong link between poverty and vulnerability to natural disasters. A study by the Belgium-based Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters looked at a recent 30-year period comparing natural disasters in the world’s 10 richest countries to those in the 10 poorest countries. The center found that the average annual number of victims per 100,000 population per rich country was 36; for the poor countries it was 2,879 even though rich countries experience the same amount of disasters.

Why is Haiti so vulnerable? Its insular economic policies and dysfunctional institutions have kept Haitians poor. While developing countries around the world have successfully implemented economic reforms and significantly increased growth by participating in globalization, Haiti has not. It ranks in the bottom half of nations listed in the Fraser Institute’s economic freedom index, and its rating has barely improved since 1980. The sustained lack of freedom goes a long way in explaining the precarious nature of Haitian’s lives.

I was able to observe as much on a visit to Haiti five years ago, not long after a popular uprising ousted autocratic President Jean Bertrand Aristide, whom Washington re-installed to power in 1990s as part of a democratic nation-building effort.

I witnessed the extreme degree of Haiti’s dysfunction. Hardly anything worked properly. Piped water delivery was unreliable or non-existent, so Haitians everywhere carried jugs or relied on water delivered by trucks. Electricity service was sporadic, so Haitians who could afford it relied on their own gasoline-powered generators; the rest went without light or used kerosene lamps. A visual inspection of the capital Port-au-Prince at night suggested that only about a third of the grid was in working order.

Public security was not only unreliable; it was dangerous. More than a couple of credible businessmen and civil society representatives recounted personal anecdotes about being kidnapped for ransom by the police. The money they paid in exchange for their freedom, they explained, went directly to Aristide. (Only nine countries in the world have more corruption, according to Transparency International). Crime was widespread, the police were considered just another armed gang, and those who could afford it hired private security.

There has been some improvement in security and foreign investment since then, but not enough to make a difference. Property rights are neither recognized nor protected by the state for the vast majority of Haitians. Bureaucratic regulations are stifling. According the World Bank, it takes 195 days and costs 228 percent of average income in legal and administrative fees just to legally start a business.

Ordinary Haitians labor heroically to survive. Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto recently calculated that 99 percent of Haitian businesses operate in the shadow economy. Prohibitively expensive formal laws push poor Haitians into the highly inefficient informal sector, limiting their potential for wealth creation.

As Haiti moves from emergency to reconstruction, calls for massive, long-term aid programs will only get louder.

The promise of aid is belied by its dismal record. Aid has helped keep Haiti poor. It has sustained poor government policies. It has led to debt, not development. The World Bank’s qualification of Haiti as a country so highly indebted that it required debt forgiveness, is an implicit admission of aid’s failure: all of Haiti’s long-term debt was due to aid and government backed development schemes.

Let’s not add to Haiti’s misfortunes by getting it back on the aid treadmill.

Instead of relying on such largesse, Haiti should use the crisis as an opportunity to unshackle its citizens by dramatically increasing their economic freedom. The key to Haitian prosperity will be the willingness and ability of Haitians themselves to implement far-reaching market reforms.

Ian Vásquez is the director of the Cato Institute’s Center for Global Liberty and Prosperity. He is a member of the Mont Pèlerin Society and a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: aid; aristide; bureaucracy; earthquake; foreignaid; freemarkets; freetrade; globalization; government; haiti; oppression; poverty; regulation; tyranny

1 posted on 01/22/2010 6:25:32 PM PST by Tolerance Sucks Rocks
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

3.8 to 4 babies per woman. No economy.

Mark Steyn talked about some American students there setting up a goat farm. He said it was pathetic that the Haitians were incapable of setting up a goat farm.

They want someone else to do everything for them.

Destroying and bankrupting Florida.


2 posted on 01/22/2010 6:29:59 PM PST by Frantzie (TV - sending Americans towards Islamic serfdom - Cancel TV service NOW)
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To: Frantzie

Poverty is not a problem - it is a symptom of a larger problem.


3 posted on 01/22/2010 6:31:13 PM PST by JudyinCanada
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To: Frantzie

......3.8 to 4 babies per woman. ......

The survival rate is too high


4 posted on 01/22/2010 6:34:44 PM PST by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 . Tax the poor. Taxes will give them a stake in society)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

No, it is not poverty, its the poverty mindset and culture. You have to change those first in order to get to prosperity. Not likely to happen in Haiti.


5 posted on 01/22/2010 6:37:13 PM PST by HerrBlucher (Jail Al Gore and the Climate Frauds!)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

socialism doesn’t work, never has.


6 posted on 01/22/2010 6:40:42 PM PST by TexasFreeper2009 (Obama lied, the economy died)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Because they have no free-market system because they are run by dictators.

Karl Denninger, writing about this, turns around and criticizes Royal Caribbean for having a resort there surrounded by razor wire.

Hey, Karl. What would be better, for RC to pull up their stakes and not stop there, thus cutting off any and all funds they pay to the country.

Or should they stay and continue to protect their interests, which keeps their customers coming back, which keeps money flowing to Haiti, and which, perhaps, may inspire some of the inhabitants to emulate the free-market system and try to make things better for their country?

The guy is such a dolt sometimes.


7 posted on 01/22/2010 6:41:15 PM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (Prepare for survival.)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

On our news this evening they were having coverage of Vikings fans in New Orleans and they were showing the 9th ward and there was an older black lady who said she sure wished obama would give some attention to them.

I for one think we should stop all foreign aid and consider this we have to borrow money and pay interest on it to send it abroad. It’s insane robbing us to pay for the world. Haiti is unsustainable they have too many people in too small an area and they have rendered the land useless. Senegal offered them land they should think about taking it.


8 posted on 01/22/2010 6:49:13 PM PST by FromLori (FromLori)
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To: All

30% of all children under five do not survive.
Clinton brought back the corrupt dictator and is now on CNN asking for money, what a complete piece of garbage this man is!
As for aid, I just read that aid feeds one million people a month! The country does need to learn to stand on its own two feet, but I doubt this crisis will change anything.


9 posted on 01/22/2010 6:50:10 PM PST by ohiogrammy (12)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Or, Pat Robertson is right.


10 posted on 01/22/2010 6:52:56 PM PST by donna (SarahPAC has donated money to...(wait for it)...Lindsey Graham!)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Too many people, too few resources.


11 posted on 01/22/2010 6:54:11 PM PST by Brilliant
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To: JudyinCanada

It is a symptom of a corrupt government and a people who have no morals. Haiti is incapable of governing itself effectively because you cannot find enough honest people to run the place. ALL of the African countries were better off economically under colonial rule.


12 posted on 01/22/2010 6:56:29 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants (Truth - Reality through the eyes of God.)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Haiti’s real problems are cultural, moral, and religious. That is it in a nut shell. Poverty is a result of cultural, moral, and religious failure not its cause.


13 posted on 01/22/2010 7:08:56 PM PST by Nuc1 (NUC1 Sub pusher SSN 668 (Liberals Aren't Patriots))
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To: donna


In Defense of Pat Robertson
14 posted on 01/22/2010 7:12:53 PM PST by RushingWater
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To: HerrBlucher
No, it is not poverty, its the poverty mindset and culture.

Yes. Look at Singapore, wealthy and well-ordered because it was designed by an Englishman, embraces free-market capitalism and doesn't tolerate social disorder. How much natural resources does Singapore possess? Probably less than Haiti.

What I foresee happening is a complete US takeover of Haiti, because they have no funcional government, no strong social institutions, and no clue. This seems likely to turn into a gigantic disaster for the US, and 0bama, as he gets involved in the impossible task of nation-building. God help the Haitian people!

15 posted on 01/22/2010 7:21:52 PM PST by ARepublicanForAllReasons (Give 'em hell, Sarah!)
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To: Nuc1

Bingo! Until we look in the mirror and admit that, our war on poverty in the U.S. and around the world will continue to fail.


16 posted on 01/22/2010 7:21:55 PM PST by ruralvoter
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To: RushingWater

Thanks for the link. It disappoints me so that Freepers carry on the attacks initiated by the media on Christians without regard to basic facts.

The result: we can’t talk about the problem in Haiti or with Islam.


17 posted on 01/22/2010 7:54:26 PM PST by donna (SarahPAC has donated money to...(wait for it)...Lindsey Graham!)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Look!
Someone’s got to be poor, and better that it’s them than us.


18 posted on 01/22/2010 8:15:55 PM PST by BuffaloJack (Hoax and Chains is not the same as hope and change.)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Haiti’s real crisis is socialism, and the misery it brings.


19 posted on 01/22/2010 8:35:20 PM PST by expatpat
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To: FromLori

Not only that, but it is actually destructive. How can a farmer compete with free food from the US, for example. Hence local agriculture destroyed.


20 posted on 01/22/2010 8:37:45 PM PST by expatpat
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

For obvious reasons Haiti is a lost cause, but America will pick up the pieces (nobody else will), and be blamed soundly.


21 posted on 01/22/2010 8:43:39 PM PST by hershey
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Poverty has virtually nothing to do with Haiti’s problems. A corrupt government with no rule of law, no respect for property rights, and no will on the part of the people to ever do it better— now THAT is the problem that Haiti has.

Haiti will be fixed when the people have had enough of what they’ve got. So far, that hasn’t happened.


22 posted on 01/22/2010 8:45:57 PM PST by Ramius (Personally, I give us... one chance in three. More tea?)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Inquiring Minds Want to Know....How many reporters are there? Every city in the US has one/two sometimes three. Europe has to have half that many. What the hell are they doing to help?

Progress’s love central government, why don’t they have a central news outlet!


23 posted on 01/22/2010 9:11:25 PM PST by 23 Everest (NRA Life Member & Tea Party Patriot)
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To: hershey

Haiti is a lost cause. You are definitely right about that. When I first heard about the earthquake there, I thought “My god, of all the countries that this could happen to, Haiti has got to be the worst.”

I’m not convinced that there is enough money in the world to properly rebuild Haiti.

I’m not convinced that there is enough money in the world to properly re-orient Haiti’s social disfunctionality.

I’m not convinced tha there’s enough money in the world to install a national or local govt that respects the rule of law.

And yes, the US will get the blame for anything and everything that goes wrong there.


24 posted on 01/22/2010 9:15:07 PM PST by MplsSteve
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks
The real problems of Haiti are government corruption and paganism. The United States has spent billions of dollars on Haiti since the 1950’s, and it is poorer today than it was ten years ago. We can throw a few billion more dollars on Haiti, and it will only get worse. Haiti is beyond saving.
25 posted on 01/22/2010 9:32:29 PM PST by Nosterrex
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To: Ramius

The only way Haiti can improve is if their entire government is contracted out to a more competent source. All of it.

From the president down to the lowest street sweeper or elementary school teacher.

And even then, it will take at least 2-3 generations of this before there is any sort of change from their ingrained ways. Which, of course, will be called ‘colonialism’.

So, therefore, it’ll never happen... and Haiti will remain a squalid cesspool filled with the dregs of humanity. Ah well, why should we care, if they don’t seem to?


26 posted on 01/22/2010 9:48:29 PM PST by gogogodzilla (Live free or die!)
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To: All
"Haiti’s real crisis is poverty"

No, it's not - it's corruption and greed, which causes poverty.

27 posted on 01/22/2010 9:51:50 PM PST by jackibutterfly
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To: gogogodzilla

I’ve actually already argued that a return to colonialism is probably the only hope that Haiti has. Canada, I think, would be the perfect outfit to do colonial rule of Haiti. After a generation or two, there might be enough local rule to start thinking about independence.


28 posted on 01/22/2010 10:00:31 PM PST by Ramius (Personally, I give us... one chance in three. More tea?)
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To: Tolerance Sucks Rocks

Perhaps the libs can explain the difference in the standards of living (pre-quake) in Haiti and DR. It’s clearly a perfect example of liberty vs tyranny.


29 posted on 01/23/2010 1:52:12 PM PST by Constitutional Patriot (Socialism is the cancer of humanity.)
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To: Ghost of Philip Marlowe

“Karl Denninger, writing about this, turns around and criticizes Royal Caribbean for having a resort there surrounded by razor wire.”

I’ve been to Labadee a few times (while cruising RC). The island is a great stop for the day and it is really great to visit with the local vendors and buy their products (wood carvings, etc.). I remember one instance when some of the vendors expressed their gratitude for people like us stopping by. The business they conducted provided a means for them to feed their families.

I’m heading down there again in March and I plan to spend some money there again.

I sure hope that RC doesn’t cave to the idiot leftists on this one.


30 posted on 01/23/2010 1:59:09 PM PST by Constitutional Patriot (Socialism is the cancer of humanity.)
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To: Constitutional Patriot

I don’t get Denninger sometimes. On some economic issues has has really good analyses, but then he goes and throws a populist comment like this, completely oblivious to the benefits of an enterprise like this.

I’m starting to think he is just opposed to anything “big” because he is “small.”


31 posted on 01/23/2010 2:04:46 PM PST by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (Prepare for survival.)
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