Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

American Grain Harvest Impact On Agri-Food Prices
The Market Oracle ^ | 2-1-2010 | Ned W Schmidt

Posted on 02/01/2010 8:06:13 PM PST by blam

American Grain Harvest Impact On Agri-Food Prices

Commodities / Agricultural Commodities
Feb 01, 2010 - 01:48 PM
By: Ned_W_Schmidt

The North American Agri-Food harvest is either complete, or almost complete. We say that as much of the corn crop remains still in the field due to being wet, frozen, or covered with snow and ice. For all the best efforts of those involved in the Global Warming Scam, the winter of 2009-10 has been far more powerful than their now clearly questionable documentation would have suggested. Despite the weather, the North American 2009 harvest appears to have been good, with both corn and soybeans seeming bountiful.

Analysts can talk of nothing but the size of the North American harvest. As they do, it seems to get larger on a daily basis. As they think about that bounty, they ponder what seems is going to be a good harvest in South America. One might think that the world is in an era of Agri-Food plenty that will last indefinitely. However, that thinking would be wrong. A good harvest in both North and South America had nothing to do with intentions and effort. It was simply chance, and not likely to be repeated. Now, the harvest is being consumed. Grains are grown to be eaten, not preserved as a curiosity.

In a hungry world, when Agri-Food supplies are plentiful in some region, consumers will be found buying. Our first chart this week, above, is the year-to-year percentage change for the major U.S. grains on two measures, that which has already been exported and export sales yet to be completed. For each of wheat, corn, soybeans, and rice, the right-hand bar represents the percentage change in export sales. The left-hand bar is the percentage change in already completed exports.

For examples, consider soybeans. This grain is one of which China has become a major net importer. For the current crop year, U.S. soybean exports have risen more than 40% from a year ago. At the same time, export sales are also up in excess of 40%. North American soybeans seem to go directly from the field to the rail car to the port to China.

[snip]


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: agriculture; commodities; harvests; peakoil

1 posted on 02/01/2010 8:06:13 PM PST by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: blam

What’s going on with wheat?

Did the wheat crop fail? I had read just that last fall - that there would be a negligible crop, if any.

The above graph seems to verify that as fact.


2 posted on 02/01/2010 9:46:47 PM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SatinDoll

There is a video on the net showing a grain elevator in Seattle that has been idle for years coming to life and shipping out grain overseas.

I have read today if you are thinking of planting a garden this year some seeds are going to hard to find, so you had better order early.

With all the Disaster declarations across the US in the last year many are questioning if we are going to have a food shortage this year.

I dont know what to believe anymore. I can find all kinds of information on a coming food shortage and I can find an equal amount saying we are not.

Why all the games? I am still going to put in a massive garden as I do every year and can every bit of it.


3 posted on 02/01/2010 11:53:10 PM PST by MRBIGMUTTS
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: MRBIGMUTTS

I too, have read about a forthcoming food shortage.

Since I don’t eat much bread if any, a shortage of wheat doesn’t bother me as much as it would others.

I’m seriously considering putting in a garden this year. But many people in the surrounding countryside are small farmers who sell at local farmers markets. I’m sure we can buy essential vegetables this summer.

We’ve already stockpiled rice, beans, triticale, and soft winter red wheat berries. I’m buying extra cans of the things we eat the most often, just in case. Recently I bought beef at low prices, so our freezer is full. There is only so much a person can do.


4 posted on 02/02/2010 12:17:19 AM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: SatinDoll

Here in central Maine I see more and more home gardens every year. Even with our short growing season, a small garden can reap great rewards. Any group that offers classes on preserving food is overwelmed with applicants.

We’ve had a veg garden since we moved here 10 years ago; And every year it gets bigger. I used to call it my ‘victory Garden’. Now I refer to it as my;

.......JOHN GALT MEMORIAL GARDEN......


5 posted on 02/02/2010 4:45:21 AM PST by maine yankee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: MRBIGMUTTS

“With all the Disaster declarations across the US in the last year many are questioning if we are going to have a food shortage this year.”

Scare tactics.
Corn and soybean crops last year were record crops.
Not to say that we couldn’t have something bad happen sometime.
A summer frost would be catastrophic if it ever happened.


6 posted on 02/02/2010 4:52:26 AM PST by HereInTheHeartland (The End of an Error - 01/20/2013)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: maine yankee

“.......JOHN GALT MEMORIAL GARDEN......”

That’s a good one!


7 posted on 02/02/2010 10:55:53 AM PST by SatinDoll (NO Foreign Nationals as our President!!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson