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To Those of Us Born Between 1925-1970
An email I recieved

Posted on 02/06/2010 8:02:54 AM PST by Dallas

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To: Natural Born 54
I had great parents, a wonderful area to grow up in and have lots and lots of good memories of childhood. We may be getting older, but we were very lucky to grow up when we did in the golden years of American life. Those really were the days.

Very true. The socialism of the country has created a very bad beast. Removing God from the town square only resulted in Satan moving in.

101 posted on 02/06/2010 10:24:24 AM PST by eyedigress ((Old storm chaser from the west)?)
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To: Dallas

When I was a kid in Houston, at dusk the city would send smoke trucks down all the streets and they would blanket the neighborhood in an impenetrable smoke screen. We kids could run or grab our bicycles and follow the truck keeping totally immersed in the smoke until our deep gulping breaths were not enough to keep us going as we tired.

DDT smoke made for some of our best child hood fun, and at dusk it was too dark for any more BB gun fights and rock throwing wars anyway, of course after the smoke cleared, there was always door bell ringing.


102 posted on 02/06/2010 10:24:29 AM PST by ansel12 (anti SoCon. Earl Warren's court 1953-1969, libertarian hero, anti social conservative loser.)
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To: Dallas

Having been born in 1971 I experienced the same. The cutoff date of 1970 is peculiar at best. I’d have probably placed it around 1980 - 1985 (having had a child grow up in that time-frame myself I know what things were like for him). PC really became ferociously evident around 1992 or so and just got worse from there on. I worked at a middle school from 1992-1994 or so and it was bad then.


103 posted on 02/06/2010 10:26:14 AM PST by jurroppi1 (America, do not commit Barry Care-y!)
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To: Kickass Conservative
"They had a range in the Basement, under the Gym."

Our middle school was built with a rifle range. It's now used for robotics, but it hasn't been completely destroyed. I'd love to see it used for shooting again . . . not likely, but dreams are free!

104 posted on 02/06/2010 10:27:48 AM PST by Think free or die (The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money - M.Thatcher)
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To: Dallas
1951.

We would leave the house in the morning during summer and go play ball all day long, sometimes returning for lunch, sometimes not. But we were either home by dark or it was a business meeting with Dad downstairs out of earshot of the younger ones.

When we weren't playing baseball, football or basketball we were building tree houses, battles with the next block over or taking old lawn mower engines and mounting them to old bikes.

And then we started noticing girls and everything changed. :-}

105 posted on 02/06/2010 10:28:45 AM PST by jwalsh07
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To: greyfoxx39

Geez, without street lights how did you know when to go home? That must have been a tough childhood. snicker snicker :O)


106 posted on 02/06/2010 10:29:26 AM PST by goat granny
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To: reagan_fanatic
I once built an elevated clubhouse in my backyard with nothing more than scraps of wood found around the neighborhood. It had electricity too, courtesy of an extension cord run from the house, and an old light socket and bulb I found, which hung from the ceiling by a nail.

I wired all the boys houses for two blocks so that we could have our own private telephones. I climbed the trees and ran the wires across the street repeatedly, it was a pretty impressive communications system and the entire time we did stuff like that, it seemed like the grownups were totally oblivious to our sub world of projects and activities.

107 posted on 02/06/2010 10:30:40 AM PST by ansel12 (anti SoCon. Earl Warren's court 1953-1969, libertarian hero, anti social conservative loser.)
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To: goat granny
Geez, without street lights how did you know when to go home? That must have been a tough childhood. snicker snicker :O)

Actually, with several grandparents, aunts and uncles close, going "home" was just an option...I spent more time at relatives than at my own home. ;)

108 posted on 02/06/2010 10:36:16 AM PST by greyfoxx39 ("The Economy Is So Bad, Even 'Rosy Scenario' Lost Her Job"-Jim Geraghty)
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To: Dallas
To Those of Us Born Between 1925-1970

are we sure that this is a good time to take God out of the Pledge of Allegiance

For nearly 2/3 of that time period, God wasn't in the Pledge of Allegiance. We survived that too.

109 posted on 02/06/2010 10:40:46 AM PST by wideminded
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To: greyfoxx39

Now that sounds like fun.......my family was spread out all over the place...


110 posted on 02/06/2010 10:46:33 AM PST by goat granny
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To: ansel12
"it seemed like the grownups were totally oblivious to our sub world of projects and activities"

So true. They gave us space to be kids and to learn by doing. My parents both had a lot of freedom during their childhoods in Czechoslovakia (between the wars), so letting us entertain ourselves came naturally. My mother grew up with grand-dad's lumber mill in her backyard. They had a pond, tennis court, and mounds of lumber just outside the back door. She always reminisced about the fun times and freedom of her childhood. Dad grew up in a village, near a trout stream. He rode his bike or walked everywhere - mostly to the stream to fish. (He's 89 now, and still fishes whenever he can.)

111 posted on 02/06/2010 10:48:35 AM PST by Think free or die (The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money - M.Thatcher)
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To: tflabo
Long before the days of "BMX" bikes, we would go to the town dump with our parents, scrounge "trashed" bicycles, and build "beater bikes" from the parts.

Most of us had "good" bikes from Santa, but it was the "beaters" we rode everywhere -- including pounding our tails off riding for miles on the railroad's crossties... But our favorite summertime "trick tracks" were the huge, dry, surface drainage ditches that abound on the Texas Gulf Coast (between Houston and Galveston Bay).

We never bothered with "fancy stuff" like fenders, chain guards or kickstands -- because they would surely get "thrashed" anyway. (You could spot a "beater bike" owner: their right jeans leg usually showed signs of "chain bite"...)

We learned some physics, too -- because we were thrilled to find scrapped bikes with different tooth-count rear or front sprockets. We had a great time messing with different ratios. (No ten-speeds -- or three-speeds -- for us!)

112 posted on 02/06/2010 10:50:02 AM PST by TXnMA (D'Aleo re Hansen's "GISS" temperature database: "Non Gradus Anus Rodentum!")
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To: Dallas

I guess the older we are at this juncture the more daring and uncontrolled our childhood...I was born in 1938, and remember vividly BB-Gun wars (no eyes put out), jumping off a bridge into the swirling tidal rip at the age of 7 and 8 - no cops no complaints - no disciplinary suggestions... Hell - we raised Hell and had a wonderful time, invented all sorts of games, usually variations of the Marines landing on Guadal or Tarrawa, used names that would today put us or our parents in Court, and never (that I remember) hurt ANYBODY, or even ourselves. I was the fastest draw of my cap gun, and went on to the Marines one day to shoot as well. I cherish a lot of those memories, and defy any present day social and intellectual eunuch to suggest that what they enforce today is one particle better!


113 posted on 02/06/2010 11:02:44 AM PST by CanGyrene (CanGyrene)
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To: Ditter

i’m sorry...indeed...girls were under tighter rein then to roam....no doubt


114 posted on 02/06/2010 11:29:43 AM PST by wardaddy (Book of Eli.....awesome.....Denzel Washington was perfect....Mila Kunis is smoking..nothing PC)
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To: Dallas

How’s this for an old memory....late 50’s. My Grandmother(Baba) used to sour her own sauerkraut. She would place my brother and I in the cement stationary laundry tubs in her cellar to scrub our feet....put clean white cotton socks on our feet....then place us standing in huge crocks to stomp on the raw shredded cabbage and salt...then jar the results once it was cured. PRICELESS!!!!


115 posted on 02/06/2010 11:55:39 AM PST by MadelineZapeezda (Promoted by God to be a mother!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!...................Thanks, Susan!)
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To: Dallas

Yes, those were the days. I remember my first paor of ice skates at age 7. I was thrilled, I spent many after school hours on the frozen pond from the time I walked to the pond until it was dark and I knew I had to get home the quickest way was along the RR tracks. From this falling down and getting bloody to playing on the high school team. The concern that my parents had was don’t be late for supper as you will have to eat it cold.

Summers were another grand adventure - camp out in the woods with our sleeping bags made from old blankets with safety pins holding them to-gether, no adults allowed. Built a log cabin with the gang, jeesh, we had axes and saws we were twelve, eleven, we didn’t cut our fingers off or get trapped by a falling tree.

Leaping from the roof of a building to a light pole guy wire with cardboard folded in our hands so we could slide down without burning our hands. Was a good time to be a child. My kids had almost the same as they were born in the covered period, I didn’t worry that they went to the pind and caught crawdads, or came home covered with mud from falling off the raft they made.

I feel for my grandkids they will not know the fabulous feeling of freedom that we had as children.


116 posted on 02/06/2010 12:07:23 PM PST by balticseaviking (been there done that , Talked the talk and sure as hell walked the walk)
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To: Dallas
Riding in the back of a pick- up truck on a warm day was always a special treat.

Meh. I bet YOUR pickup truck had SIDES around the bed. We rode around on the flatbed, clinging to whatever we could for dear life - and loving it!

117 posted on 02/06/2010 12:16:32 PM PST by ctdonath2 (Pelosi is practically President; the Obama is just her talk show host.)
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To: balticseaviking
"I feel for my grandkids they will not know the fabulous feeling of freedom that we had as children."

We've tried to provide our children with freedom. We let them get dirty, sent them to 7 weeks of old-fashioned boys' camp in New Hampshire, sent them out to play in the stream and woods in the back yard, and provided them with Scout camping trips. They've had more independence than most of their school friends, and yet they think we're over-protective. We each need to do what we can to help youngsters develop independence and to give them some space to play. It's harder than it was in our time. Their pals are all in structured programs, academic "enrichment camps", and otherwise protected from "wasting their time" or getting hurt. Today our guys helped my husband clear the driveway and now are out playing in the fresh 15 inches of snow. They're throwing snow into the stream, attempting to build a land bridge to another continent (along with throwing it at each other, of course). Good old fashioned fun, even at 14 and 16!

118 posted on 02/06/2010 12:37:01 PM PST by Think free or die (The problem with socialism is that you eventually run out of other people's money - M.Thatcher)
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To: Dallas

1946. Grew up in Long Beach, California. Rode my bike everywhere. Took the P.E. (aka Red Car) by myself up to downtown L.A. to see relatives. Made stops in Willowbrook, Watts, etc. Never bothered by anybody. As others have said, it was a different and IMHO better world then.


119 posted on 02/06/2010 12:42:37 PM PST by hanamizu
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To: PLMerite

Dialing 911 is the government’s twisted idea of Dail-a-Parayer.


120 posted on 02/06/2010 1:50:20 PM PST by SandRat (Duty, Honor, Country! What else needs said?)
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To: Ditter

Mysteriously, my mother always knew where we were. A kid would show up at the empty lot where we were playing and tell us our mother wanted us to go home for supper. We were always outdoors. Loved when the seasons changed and we could go out and play after supper. (Newark, NJ)


121 posted on 02/06/2010 1:59:33 PM PST by firebrand
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To: TXnMA

1952 here, small town in central Ohio.

My first two bikes were hand-me-down beaters that barely rolled. The first one didn’t have fenders or a chain guard, and I am fortunate to be here speaking with you today as my pants cuffs once got caught in the chain, bringing me to an abrupt stop while I was in traffic. I nearly got hit by a car coming up behind me, and I was saved only by the car swerving one way while I managed to topple over the other. When I got a paper route in 1965, my second beater-bike’s brakes were failing, so a new bike was needed. I was a working boy now and spending long evenings in the saddle disseminating the news to the masses, so I needed dependable — and safe — transportation. I should have gotten a proper working boy’s heavy-duty bike, but I was seduced by the sports-car appeal of the Schwinn Sting-Ray. I even thought it was practical for the work, since I’d drape the newspaper bags over the banana seat. In the event, sitting on the papers wasn’t that convenient, and it turned out to be a fairly bad choice of bike for the job at hand.

Also — small-wheeled bikes were something new in the world then, and reports came to my ears that the cool kids (who all had ten-speeds) thought I looked “dorky” riding that dinky little thing. All these years later, it seems as though small-wheeled bikes are now pretty much the common type.


122 posted on 02/06/2010 2:20:30 PM PST by Deklane
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To: Dallas
1958 here

Some great memories hereon.

I remember riding down the new freeway towards Adelaide with a mate of mine.We both had an air rifle and a 22 strapped across our backs in a big x shape.We thought it made us look like cool mexican bandits.A traffic cop pulled us over and showed us the sign just up the road that said "no bicycles on freeway" and made us get off and walk the last 1/4 mile till the freeway ended.No mention of the guns!

Can you imagine the scenario today.Good grief we'd have helicopters and half the force after us!

We practically lived on our bikes.

They were great days,not a worry in the world.

123 posted on 02/06/2010 2:51:42 PM PST by mitch5501 (Yeah,but is it shatterproof?)
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To: Peter W. Kessler
Like my Mom once told me: “We don’t go on vacations because we LIVE where people go on vacation.”
I can say that now. I live in Las Vegas. ;)
124 posted on 02/06/2010 2:56:09 PM PST by BluesDuke (Another brief interlude from the small apartment halfway up in the middle of nowhere in particular)
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To: Dallas

BTTT!


125 posted on 02/06/2010 3:01:06 PM PST by wagglebee ("A political party cannot be all things to all people." -- Ronald Reagan, 3/1/75)
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To: tflabo
Schwinn Sting Ray!

Used to ride wheelies for hundreds of yards.

I see that one has a “Slick” on it. Butterfly handlebars,banana seat!

I used to build my own from scavenged parts.

1957 here.

126 posted on 02/06/2010 3:21:18 PM PST by Randy Larsen ( BTW, If I offend you! Please let me know, I may want to offend you again!(FR #1690))
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To: advertising guy

Let me outdo your story.

Many years ago, my Best Friend gets Married. He was working in a Grocery Store and took a part time job working for a Pool Cleaning Service to make extra money.

He is helping unload Pool Chlorine off a flat bed truck. The 5 gallon Chlorine bottles were in boxes of four. As he was sliding the boxes toward the back of the bed, he tripped on a warped board and flew off the truck.

His Wife of one month calls me to tell me he is in the Hospital. I walk in the room. There he is with two broken arms smiling away.

While his Wife was working, his Mother In Law came over to help him out. Needless to say, he suffered with painful “digestive” issues until his Wife got home. He had amazing mind control. LOL

His wife proved her love for him then and there. She was and is a Princess.

And yes, I remember the Stingray with the 3 speed stick shift on the crossbar. A buddy of mine had one and hit a pothole, sliding him off the seat into the stick shift. It was not pleasant to see or hear his reaction...

How in the world did we survive such obstacles in life?


127 posted on 02/06/2010 4:11:26 PM PST by Kickass Conservative (There is nothing Democratic about the Democrat Party...)
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To: Deklane

I did my first paper route on a Stingray too. I delivered the Glendale News Press. The worst part of the job was collecting the money, not delivering the papers.


128 posted on 02/06/2010 4:18:07 PM PST by Kickass Conservative (There is nothing Democratic about the Democrat Party...)
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To: Kickass Conservative; Deklane
"How in the world did we survive such obstacles in life?"

Indeed! My parents got me my only "store-bought" full size (26") bike when I was far too short to reach the pedals. So -- I rode it with no seat, sitting on the luggage rack.

I recall a few painful incidents like your friend's, but I must have survived OK... We have three kids and six grandkids... '-)

(BTW, 1937 for me...)

129 posted on 02/06/2010 4:42:43 PM PST by TXnMA (D'Aleo re Hansen's "GISS" temperature database: "Non Gradus Anus Rodentum!")
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To: Kickass Conservative

we survived cause no one told us we couldn’t !!!!!!


130 posted on 02/06/2010 5:13:21 PM PST by advertising guy (Consumer Of Confiscated Liquers Czar)
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To: advertising guy

I was born in 1948. I remember my mother washing out my mouth with soap for using a swear word and being punished with a switch across my backside and on the back of my hands for being late for dinner...today, that would be child abuse! There was a DDT truck that came around the neighborhood spewing out the white DDT fog and we would run in it and laugh. I’m still alive! I don’t ever remember locking the door to the house .. no need! Things are “uglier.” today. My grandchildren live a very different world than what I knew and it saddens me. I was told that I would need to get a permit for my son to have a treehouse ... how absurd I complained ... so, my kids did not have a treehouse because the Nanny State had arrived. I watched the younger generation tell their children not to walk on a ledge because it was dangerous ... I was considered dangerous for saying that children can’t learn without testing their boundaries. Yes, we had the fear of socialism/communism ... and today we live in socialism/communism.


131 posted on 02/06/2010 7:48:21 PM PST by Docs Galore
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To: Kickass Conservative
Re:#76

LOL...I put baseball cards in my spokes. Those cards are probably worth a fortune today.

132 posted on 02/07/2010 10:47:30 AM PST by Dallas
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To: gitmo
re:#88

Oh man...I did that too. Who knew?...LOL

133 posted on 02/07/2010 10:51:48 AM PST by Dallas
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To: gitmo
Re:#91

You are on a roll...LOL

We never locked our doors.

134 posted on 02/07/2010 10:54:37 AM PST by Dallas
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To: Docs Galore
I was born in 1947 and had my mouth washed out with soap only a couple of times and it cured the bad word problem! Got switched, spanked with a hairbrush, usually for being very sassy.
I caught the city bus to the movie theater, downtown, and the library from the time I was 9 yrs old. Would take off on my bike or roller skates and go for miles. I'm a girl so I had to report in for lunch and dinner.
We drank whole milk, ate eggs and bacon for breakfast and we were all skinny as rails. I knew only a couple of overweight kids and they would be merely plump by today's standards.
The helicopter parent was unheard of but you were in deep if you got in trouble at school.
135 posted on 02/07/2010 11:13:06 AM PST by k omalley (Caro Enim Mea, Vere est Cibus, et Sanguis Meus, Vere est Potus)
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To: Dallas

bfl


136 posted on 02/07/2010 11:15:20 AM PST by Skooz (Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us)
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To: Dallas

All of this is true, but it was also us that let the pansy assed, litigious, politically correct, tree hugging hypocrites, hoplophobes, and progressive Marxist scum take over our universities and government.

So ... until we take out that trash, we really haven’t accomplished as much as we might like to think.


137 posted on 02/07/2010 11:25:26 AM PST by spodefly (I have posted nothing but BTTT over 1000 times!!!)
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To: gitmo
We used to go play in the DDT fog when the mosquito fog machine came down the truck. The fog was so thick you couldn’t see your buddies or even hear them.

1949 checking in here. I loved the "fog machine." No one ever told me not to chase it. Mom would say my clothes smelled bad afterwards, tho.

Of course Mom had some wonderful advice over the years, too. She wasn't sympathetic to my complaints that the boy two doors down was bullying me. She said that I needed to stand up for myself against him. (I was all of 8 years old at the time.) She certainly wasn't going to do it. When I finally took him on and ground his face into the gravel alley next to our house, I can still remember looking up and seeing her smiling through the window above the kitchen sink.

138 posted on 02/09/2010 4:51:18 AM PST by RightField (A fine is a tax for doing wrong. A tax is a fine for doing well.)
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To: Dallas

Needs to be more of this

We would get spankings with wooden spoons, switches, ping-pong paddles, or just a bare hand, and no one would call child services to report abuse.


139 posted on 02/09/2010 5:06:42 AM PST by piroque
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To: Dallas

1954 here... I have so many memories of those times. Nothing like baseball on a handheld AM radio back then.


140 posted on 02/09/2010 5:17:45 AM PST by Lando Lincoln (Gee, it looks like climate change was man-made after all!)
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To: wideminded; Las Vegas Ron; LucyT; Candor7; MHGinTN

I’ll bet that God in the Pledge just drives you bonkers you troll.


141 posted on 02/13/2010 1:23:03 PM PST by mojitojoe (“Medicine is the keystone of the arch of socialism.” - Vladimir Lenin)
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To: SamAdams76

I was in basic training US Army the spring of 1975. Since all our MOS was combat arms, we had some top notch drill Sargents.


142 posted on 04/12/2010 11:34:02 PM PDT by valkyry1
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To: RandallFlagg

Were you ever able to star up and get going a large construction vehicle? I was. It was one one those hinged things and I had to jump off when it got going.

Last I saw of it, it was going around in a circle!


143 posted on 04/12/2010 11:50:11 PM PDT by valkyry1
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To: Ditter

This is true!


144 posted on 04/12/2010 11:52:53 PM PDT by valkyry1
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To: Think free or die

Hey I was in Buchanan from 1965 to 1972


145 posted on 04/12/2010 11:57:34 PM PDT by valkyry1
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To: Dallas; All

Hah I did everything you guys did and more!! LOL

1954 for me


146 posted on 04/13/2010 12:01:38 AM PDT by valkyry1
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To: Dallas
Born in 57 & lucky enough to still have both parents now. I lived in town {Knoxville} from 6-9 and pretty much went where I pleased. I'd check in maybe twice a day in the summer usually for lunch them come in about dark.

Then we moved to the country a dream come true for me. LOL. By age 14 I was camping out by myself on the lake most the summer. Dad left me there with a 14 foot V hull fishing boat with a late 1940’s 7.5 open faced Evinrude, the dog, and a rifle. He'd check in on me every day or so to bring ice and food. Camp was a Lean-to tarp. Cooked my own meals and took care of my self. Nearest phone was about 4 miles away or so.

When dad was a kid he's ride a bike or walk to a farm 30-35 miles away on Saturday to a friends house near the river and spend the night then come back home on Sunday. In the summer he and his brother camped out all summer on the Holston or French Broad rivers. His uncle or his dad came up on weekends. I'm glad I got to see that part of growing up my dad did and that he allowed me to do it. By my late teens or early twenty's that era was gone.

One song by Joe South that was popular when I was a teen says it all. “Don't it make you want to go home.” Except I stayed in the community I spend almost all my life and watched the changes come.

147 posted on 04/13/2010 12:32:43 AM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: cva66snipe

I hear you about staying put and watching the changes. I was born in ‘40 and have lived in and around Houston most of the time. The country roads I rode my horse on are 8 lane freeways now.


148 posted on 04/13/2010 6:20:06 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: cva66snipe

I hear you about staying put and watching the changes. I was born in ‘40 and have lived in and around Houston most of the time. The country roads I rode my horse on are 8 lane freeways now.


149 posted on 04/13/2010 6:36:55 AM PDT by Ditter
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To: Dr. Bogus Pachysandra
This was not written by Jay Leno, nor David Letterman, who it was also attributed to, but by Craig Smith.

I'm not so sure it was even Craig Smith. Craig did write another piece wrongly attributed to Leno and/or Letterman, but this wasn't it.

Is it really too much to ask to do just a small amount of checking instead of just blindly posting emails like this?? (not directed at you Dr. B!)

150 posted on 04/13/2010 7:03:06 AM PDT by Tatze (I reject your reality and substitute my own!)
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