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Why We "REMEMBER THE ALAMO" (Alamo Observance March 6th, San Antonio, TX)
Grand Lodge of Texas A.F. & A.M. ^ | Part reprinted from Spring 1998 | Dwight Stevens

Posted on 03/04/2010 2:16:39 PM PST by Texas Fossil

The Alamo should be remembered as the place where the Mexican Army, under command of General Antonio Lopez De Santa Anna, stormed a former Mexican mission defended by a band of Texans fighting for their independence. Among the defenders were our Masonic Brothers James Bonham, Jim Bowie, David Crockett, Almaron Dickenson and Col. William Barrett Travis.

In rooms where priests had prayed, bayonets clashed with Bowie Knives and swords. Musket and cannon fire tore into the Texan defenders. By dawn, all the Texan combatants lay dead. Their sacrifice, on March 6, 1836, would immortalize them as legends, and turn the Alamo grounds into Sacred Ground.

Each year more than three million Americans visit the Alamo. For many of the visitors, who gaze with reverence at the paintings and exhibits, the Alamo is more shrine than historic monument. They have come to the Alamo to honor those whose death gave birth to a Republic.

Brother William Barrett Travis, Commander of the Alamo garrison, is said to have drawn a line in thesand requesting all who would stay and fight to: "step across the line." He drew that line not only in the sand, but into the hearts and minds of every Texas Mason.

Many months after the battle, the charred remains of the Alamo defenders were laid to rest not far from the Alamo itself. Presiding at the ceremony was Brother Juan Sequin. The words he spoke at the interment speak to us even today:

"The spirit of liberty appears to be looking down from it's elevated throne saying: Behold your Brothers: Crockett, Bowie, Travis. They preferred to die a thousand times rather than submit themselves to the tyrants yoke. Their sacrifices are worthy of inclusion in the pages of history. What a brilliant example for others to follow."

If you have not had the opportunity to visit the Alamo, please do so at your earliest possible convenience. The Daughter's of the Republic of Texas have lovingly turned the Alamo Mission into a shrine. It remains to this day a shrine to the heroes of Texas liberty. The veneration of the defenders reached a new height in 1939 with the dedication of The Alamo Cenotaph. Towering sixty feet above the Alamo, the monument's theme is: "The Spirit of Sacrifice". Statues of the principal defenders, and the names of all the Texans who died at the Alamo, are carved into the granite foundation. During your visit, you will find that the Alamo is a powerful place. It's a place filled with legends and memories. It's a place we all should go think about our own potential, about what we need to sacrifice so that we can keep the fraternity on the road that those men fought to preserve.

--

One of the few who survived the massacre at the Alamo was Mrs. Almaron Dickenson (Suzanna) who had been advised by her husband to display his Masonic apron over herself and the child during and after the battle. Santa Anna saw to her needs and even offered to adopt her child. She declined the offer declaring that she would "crawl and work her fingers to the bone to support the baby, but that she would rather see the child starve than given into the hands of the author of so much horror."


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: alamo; remember; sanantonio
People that have never been to the Alamo cannot understand how such a small building can command such reverence from the citizens of the state.

Would be oppressors should take note that although this building symbolizes a defeat in battle, but will forever be a symbol of defiance to tryants.

So may it forever be.

1 posted on 03/04/2010 2:16:40 PM PST by Texas Fossil
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To: MeekOneGOP; basil; Jeff Head

Ping


2 posted on 03/04/2010 2:20:04 PM PST by Fiddlstix (Warning! This Is A Subliminal Tagline! Read it at your own risk!(Presented by TagLines R US))
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To: Texas Fossil

Hallowed ground. God Bless Texas.


3 posted on 03/04/2010 2:21:10 PM PST by TADSLOS (Tea Party. We are the party of NO! NO to more government! NO to more spending! NO to more taxation!)
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To: Texas Fossil

Thanks (from us real Texans) for posting this.

I had no idea those brave warriors were Masons.


4 posted on 03/04/2010 2:27:03 PM PST by wolfcreek (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lsd7DGqVSIc)
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To: wolfcreek
You don’t know much about American history do you?
5 posted on 03/04/2010 2:32:11 PM PST by Little Bill (Carol Che-Porter is a MOONBAT.)
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To: Texas Fossil

I am moved every time I see the flags of all the countries and all the states that those brave men represented.


6 posted on 03/04/2010 2:33:46 PM PST by Jedidah (Character, courage, common sense are more important than issues.)
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To: Texas Fossil

“People that have never been to the Alamo cannot understand how such a small building can command such reverence from the citizens of the state.

Would be oppressors should take note that although this building symbolizes a defeat in battle, but will forever be a symbol of defiance to tryants.

So may it forever be. “

_______________

I second that, as a Texas Born American.

We lost some GOOD men that day. Cong. David Crockett had the fortitude to actually stand up to the wrongs of his very popular president.

Some historians contend Congressman David Crockett’s political career ended because of his support for the Cherokee against President Jackson’s removal plans. Crockett explains his position in 1834:

“.......His famous, or rather I should say infamous, Indian bill was brought forward, and I opposed it from the purest motives in the world.

Several of my colleagues got around me, and told me how well they loved me, and that I was ruining myself. They said this was a favourite measure of the president, and I ought to go for it.

I told them I believed it was a wicked, unjust measure, and that I should go against it, let the cost to myself be what it might; that I was willing to go with General Jackson in everything that I believed was honest and right; but further than this I wouldn’t go for him, or any other man in the whole creation.

I voted against this Indian bill, and my conscience yet tells me that I gave a good honest vote, and that I believe will not make me ashamed in the day of judgment.”


7 posted on 03/04/2010 2:34:34 PM PST by AuntB (WE are NOT a nation of immigrants! We're a nation of Americans! http://towncriernews.blogspot.com/)
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To: Texas Fossil

I’m a 7th generation Texan, and every time I visit the Alamo I’m struck by the reverence I feel for what happened there.

Liberty fought and died for by men who came from Texas, other states and other countries.

Thanks go to the Daughters of the Republic of Texas for preserving the site.


8 posted on 03/04/2010 2:34:56 PM PST by Texas56
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To: Texas Fossil

Texas forever.


9 posted on 03/04/2010 2:39:30 PM PST by Deaf Smith (When a Texan takes his chances, chances will be taken that's for sure.)
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I was in San Antonio for a conference and only got to visit the Alamo at night, when it was closed. But even at night, it is a majestic presence.

I don’t think my liberal conference mates understood how thrilled and in awe I was to finally see the Alamo in person and to touch its walls. I’ve been around and seen a lot, but seeing the Alamo was certainly one of the highlights of my travels.


10 posted on 03/04/2010 2:41:47 PM PST by radiohead (Buy ammo, get your kids out of government schools, pray for the Republic.)
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To: Texas Fossil

Remember Goliad.


11 posted on 03/04/2010 2:44:08 PM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: wolfcreek

About the Republic of Texas>

http://www.starmuseum.org/questions.htm

An article from the June 24, 1934 issue of the Dallas News by T. B. Baldwin relates the story of how Texas got its Lone Star. His story recounts the actions of Henry Smith, who became the first governor of pre-revolutionary Texas in 1835. “In Smith’s day overcoats had large brass buttons. It happened that the buttons on the coat of Governor Smith had the impress of a five-pointed star. A few days after he was inaugurated Governor, a messenger arrived with important papers. After reading and signing them the Governor said: “Texas should have a seal,” and forthwith he cut one of the big buttons from his overcoat and with sealing wax stamped the impress of the Lone Star upon the documents.”

It might also be noted that there may have been a Masonic influence to the adoption of a five-pointed star for Texas. George K. Teulon in Freemasons’ Monthly Magazine in 1844 noted, “Texas is emphatically a Masonic Country; all of our Presidents and Vice-President, and four-fifths of our State Officers were and are Masons: by Freemasonry to illustrate the moral virtues—it is a Five Pointed Star...May it ever bind us in the holy Bond of Fraternal Union and govern our social, Masonic, and Political intercourse.”

None of this should surprise anyone.


12 posted on 03/04/2010 2:48:14 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil
Interesting coincidence to your post as I am in San Antonio right now (from So Cal for work) and just returned to my hotel from a quick visit to the Alamo a few minutes ago! It is a great place to spend one or a few hours. I think many here would appreciate how many of the defenders were not from Texas.
13 posted on 03/04/2010 2:49:15 PM PST by Shark24
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To: Texas Fossil
Hallowed Ground.


14 posted on 03/04/2010 2:49:31 PM PST by ConservaTexan (February 6, 1911)
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To: TexasRepublic
Remember Goliad.

Yes, Indeed. But more importantly remember San Jacinto!

15 posted on 03/04/2010 2:51:22 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Shark24

Yes. Texas is not where you were born, but a State of Mind, Heart and Attitude.

Some of my ancestors were born in Texas during “The Republic”. But none the less, the above statement is still true. We are Texans not because of birth but because of loyalty to each other.

Similar to this. “Born American but in the wrong place”

http://www.claremont.org/publications/pubid.5/pub_detail.asp

Some things never change, especially amoung people who love freedom, and defy tyrannts.


16 posted on 03/04/2010 2:57:25 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil

My wife and I went to the Alamo several years ago and I can’t explain the feelings that came over me, it is truly hollowed ground and those that died do live on as they have not been forgotten. We had planned on being there just a short time, well it ended up being hours, and more than worth it.


17 posted on 03/04/2010 3:03:24 PM PST by engrpat (A village in Kenya is missing their idiot...lets send him back)
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To: Texas Fossil

Even though I was born and raised in Iowa, and I’ve never been to Texas, I feel I have a lot more in common with Texan’s beliefs and their value system than I do with these darn Yankees!


18 posted on 03/04/2010 3:04:39 PM PST by reagan_fanatic (Our politicians are stupid and our policies unsustainable)
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To: Texas Fossil

Doug Sahm lyrics SOONER OR LATER:

“Everybody makes a promise, everybody breaks a promise, say we’re only human after all.
Toe to toe and eye to eye you take a stand you draw the line, pretty soon your back’s against
the wall. Then the bombs will fly, shootin’ stars across the sky by the dawn’s early light you
might be free.

“Sooner or later we’re all gonna’ make it to the Alamo. Ready or not there’s a battle to be won.
Are you coming with me to the Alamo? Sooner or later you’ve got to fight for what you love.

“Lord lead me to the Alamo. That’s where I want to go. Sooner or later I’m comin’ home.”


19 posted on 03/04/2010 3:14:30 PM PST by Anima Mundi (The trouble with trouble is it starts out as Utopia)
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To: Texas Fossil

“remember San Jacinto!”

Yep, don’t mess with Texas - we kick ass.


20 posted on 03/04/2010 3:16:40 PM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: Texas Fossil
So true. Of course this Connecticut Yankee loves his heritage and as a bonus any State that can give us both Laura Ingraham and Ann Coulter can't be all bad! Now I am off to the River Walk with the rest of my motley crew for some fine Texas cuisine and adult beverages. Will hoist one to the spirit of the Alamo.
21 posted on 03/04/2010 3:24:32 PM PST by Shark24
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To: Texas Fossil

I am a proud descendant of Andrew Kent who fought and died there. I am always in awe when I think about the fact that they knew they were outnumbered and were really just regular folks doing what they saw as the right thing.


22 posted on 03/04/2010 3:27:04 PM PST by brytlea (Jesus loves me, this I know.)
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To: Texas Fossil
I'll make my second visit to this venerable site in April.
Whomever The Alamo's caretakers are, (city of San Antonio?), they do a magnificent job.

Only 49 days until I am amongst the revelers at


23 posted on 03/04/2010 3:28:04 PM PST by jla
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To: Texas Fossil

Born not far from the Alamo, at Ft Sam Houston, now isn’t that a coincidence, I consider it an honor and humble privilege to have been born in the free republic of Texas. Bought and paid for by those who stood so long ago in defense of Liberty and the Alamo.


24 posted on 03/04/2010 3:37:10 PM PST by wita
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To: reagan_fanatic

I traveled for a living for over 30 years, all over the Midwest. Farm people are similar almost everywhere you go. That is what rural Americas was and is. Rooted in earth, un-pretentious and largely honest. The essense of this great nation.

I have spent time in Iowa and liked the people very much.

Patriots are the same everywhere.

TF


25 posted on 03/04/2010 3:43:01 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil

My ancestor Thomas R.Miller:

OLD EIGHTEEN. “Old Eighteen” was a term used to describe the Gonzales men who, late in September 1835, delayed Mexican attempts to reclaim the town’s cannon until militiamen from surrounding settlements could be summoned. Their efforts in large measure provoked the subsequent battle of Gonzales. Members of the Old Eighteen were William W. Arrington, Valentine Bennet, Joseph D. Clements, Jacob C. Darst, George W. Davis, Almaron Dickinson, Benjamin Fuqua, Thomas Jackson, Albert Martin, Charles Mason, Thomas R. Miller, Simeon Bateman, Almon Cottle, Graves Fulchear, James Hinds, John Sowell, Winslow Turner, and Ezekiel Williams.

And a slaut to my GGGG uncle, Deaf Smith, who helped bury the burned remains at the Alamo and also fired the first shot at the Battle of San Jacinto.


26 posted on 03/04/2010 4:11:15 PM PST by SaxxonWoods (Gone Galt and loving it)
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To: SaxxonWoods

slaut = salute (above)


27 posted on 03/04/2010 4:12:41 PM PST by SaxxonWoods (Gone Galt and loving it)
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To: Texas Fossil

To The People of Texas and
All Americans In The World —
February 24, 1836

Fellow citizens & compatriots —

I am beseiged, by a thousand or more of the Mexicans under Santa Anna — I have sustained a continual Bombardment & cannonade for 24 hours & have not lost a man — The enemy has demanded a surrender at discretion, otherwise, the garrison are to be put to the sword, if the fort is taken — I have answered the demand with a cannon shot, & our flag still waves proudly from the walls — I shall never surrender or retreat. Then, I call on you in the name of Liberty, of patriotism, & every thing dear to the American character, to come to our aid, with all dispatch — The enemy is receiving reinforcements daily & will no doubt increase to three or four thousand in four or five days. If this call is neglected, I am determined to sustain myself as long as possible & die like a soldier who never forgets what is due to his own honor & that of his country —

VICTORY OR DEATH

William Barret Travis
Lt. Col. Comdt.


28 posted on 03/04/2010 4:29:37 PM PST by Texas Mulerider (Rap music: hieroglyphics with a beat.)
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To: Texas Mulerider

Thank you for that letter - very interesting.

Not sure what I can do about it though. I hope someone else can help this poor guy though. Does he have a website? Maybe I’ll send him a couple of bucks. I’m not sure what the big deal is though. Those Mexicans are just looking for a job to survive and feed their families. Heck, most of them are jobs Americans don’t want to do anyway.


29 posted on 03/04/2010 4:37:40 PM PST by 21twelve (Having the Democrats in control is like a never-ending game of Calvin ball. (Giotto))
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To: SaxxonWoods

Out of respect for your GGGG uncle, Deaf Smith. San Jacinto is not far away.

Here is a description of that battle and it is mentioned he was tasked to burn the Vince’s bridge (escape path).

http://www.grandlodgeoftexas.org/node/1219

Houston’s Army defeats Santa Anna

(written as a newpaper article)

From the El Paso Times (during the Sesqui-centennnial)

by Ed Pass

San Jacinto, Texas, April 21, 1836

Here, where the land meets the sea. Gen Sam Houston’s Army of 783 men has defeated and put to rout Mexico’s Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna and his military force of about 1,200 men.

The Lone Star flag of Texas, and no other, flies over the newly-born republic as the sun sets on this glorious day.

Two Texans were killed and about 30 wounded. Mexican loses were heavy 630 dead and 700 prisioners.

Somewhere in the marshes at land’s end, where there is no escape, Santa Anna, Mexico’s dictator-president, is in hiding.

The Texans expect to find the general tomorrow and establish surrender terms.

The victorious battle climaxes a long retreat by Houston from Gonzales, across swollen rivers, as he sought the right place and time to recoil. He found them here.

Santa Anna had outrun the main body of his army hoping to capture the Texas government at Harrisburg. President David Burnett and his cabinet fled in the nick of time to Galveston Island.

Santa Anna burned Harrisburg, then moved his army over Vince’s Bridge that crosses a bayou. When Houston learned of this move, he ordered his troops across the bridge and marched them to within less than a mile of the Mexicans.

At 9:00AM this morning (April 21), 540 men under Gen. Martin Perfecto de Cos crossed Vince’s bridge to join Santa Anna. Houston dispatched Erastus Deaf Smith to destroy the bridge, thereby preventing more arrivals or retreat by either side.

For Texans, this meant victory or death.

At 3:30PM today, Houston paraded his troops, telling them the time of battle was at hand. The infantry formed a line 1,000 yards across. Artillery and cavalry flanked them. Somebody in the line held a flag a five-point blue star on a white field Proclaiming in Latin where liberty lives, there is our homeland.

A German with a fife struck up a tune. Come to the Bower, as a black man beat a drum. Houston, on horseback, commanded: Forward Texas as he drew his sword. The Twin Sisters, two cannon given by the people of Cincinnati, were poised.

Col. Sydney Sherman, on the left flank, cried. Remember the Alamo! Remember Goliad!

Others picked up the chant as they advanced up a small rise of land shielding them from the enemy. Then they charged as the cannon blew away a bulwark of baggage and saddles. Caught in siesta and without sentries, the Mexican army was in panic. The Texans were amoung them before they could strike a formation.

Houston had 2 horses shot from under him and a rifle ball hit his foot.

In 18 minutes, the fighting was over. The following silence was like an anthem.


30 posted on 03/04/2010 4:58:13 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas56
’m a 7th generation Texan, and every time I visit the Alamo I’m struck by the reverence I feel for what happened there.

I am not a Texan but I was at the Alamo in the late 80s and
I felt that same reverence. It was almost tangible.

31 posted on 03/04/2010 5:11:08 PM PST by Know et al (Everything I know I read in the newspaper and that's the reason for my ignorance: Will Rogers)
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To: Texas Fossil

32 posted on 03/04/2010 5:18:14 PM PST by AdvisorB (Obamatude could be defined by Blago as something tangible, but not quite as tangible as JJJ's offer.)
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To: Texas Fossil
God bless Texas!

The Alamo and Thermopylae have much in common. Overwhelming odds, men of honor and preservation of something greater than themselves:

At the Battle of Thermopylae, Xerxes I of Persia, with 600,000 men, met King Leonidas I of Sparta, with only 300 men. Leonidas had predicted the outcome of the battle, and so he chose only men with sons old enough to take over their family duties. Xerxes promised to spare the lives of the 300 Spartans if they would only lay down their weapons. The Spartans refused, shouting "Molon Labe" ("Come and Get Them"), and held the narrow mountain pass of Thermopylae for days. All the Spartans were eventually killed, but they inflicted such damage to the Persian army (20,000-40,000 dead) that Xerxes was unable to utterly conquer the Greek Peninsula. This act of heroism did nothing less than save Western civilization. The world that you know is due in no small part to those brave men who gave their lives 2,500 years ago. Today there lies a plaque at the site of the battle. It reads: "Go tell the Spartans, passerby, that here, by Spartan law, we lie." John Ruskin called this epitaph the noblest words ever uttered by man. The story of Thermopylae is very similar to the Alamo. Travis, Crockett, and Bowie considered their lives less important than the freedom of their people. As Otto Scott said, "Ours are the same tests and crises that our fathers and forefathers encountered." Our people face the threat of extinction today, and unless we count our lives as less important than the lives of our children, our people will perish. Sic Semper Tyrannis.

Our brave ancestors would be heart broken and outraged to know of the current invasion overtaking our nation. May we draw inspiration from the actions of these valiant men.

33 posted on 03/04/2010 5:18:23 PM PST by Altura Ct.
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To: Altura Ct.
God bless Texas!

Yes, God Bless Texas Indeed! And God Bless the United States of America!

May "We the People" Allways Defend Her, Against All Enemies both Foreign and Domestic!

34 posted on 03/04/2010 6:07:43 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Fiddlstix; All

If Texas were to secede tomorrow, I would move there immediately with 6 other good fellows to defend our Freedom.

Or, as Davy himself said:

‘You can go to hell! I’m going to Texas!’


35 posted on 03/04/2010 7:49:51 PM PST by x1stcav (Charter member of the Yukon Army..)
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To: Texas Fossil

Fantastic thread Fossil, As for myself, I was born in Baptist Hospital in San Antonio in the late 50’s. Spent a lot of time in and around The Alamo when I was a kid, and go back every chance I get. I still live within 70 miles of that Hallowed Ground. God Bless Texas and all who fought for her.


36 posted on 03/04/2010 8:05:29 PM PST by davetex (Arm up, Ammo up, Practice up, We're on our own.)
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To: davetex

Thanks.

I am affected for life by this and other Texas history.

Have some family history stories that are not in the books.

What matters is that when the chips are down Texans will still get the job done. Tyrannts have no place here.

We could field a million man army in a few days with just the word “help” uttered by the Governor. I know of no other state which that would be possible in.

Lets pray it is never necessary. But I have no doubt in the outcome should it be. Lots of 60-80 year olds would be there too. There are still some tough old birds on this turf.

My father was an armorer in Europe during WWII, he maintained quad 50’s and Bofors. He saw Dachau 3 weeks after it was liberated. Left a permainent imprint on him.

He came back home married and went back to farming and raised my brother and I. Modern day Cincinattius. Quiet farmer warrior. He hates what is happening as much as I do. Last time I looked he had 18 rifles in his gun case. And he is still good with them at 84. My brother and I owe him a lot.


37 posted on 03/04/2010 10:47:00 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil

Thank you, that’s a nicely written account. San Jacinto, where the mulatto (yellow) “Rose” of Texas distracted Santa Anna at the appointed time, assisting the Texians to achieve surprise. That’s one story anyway, and I like it. It also would explain how Santa Anna acquired the dress he was wearing when captured.


38 posted on 03/04/2010 11:18:12 PM PST by SaxxonWoods (Gone Galt and loving it)
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To: Texas Fossil

< p>


39 posted on 03/05/2010 4:04:25 AM PST by Rightly Biased (If Clinton was the first black president then Obama is the first black Jesus.)
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To: TexasRepublic

The Goliad Massacre

On Palm Sunday, March 27, 1836, after being held captive for one week, the men were told to gather up their things. They thought that they were going to the port of Copano and then on to New Orleans. They were happy and singing. They knew that Colonel Fannin had returned from the Port of Copano the previous day. What they didn't know was that at 7:00 p.m. the pervious evening, Colonel Portilla had received word directly from Santa Anna to execute the men. About an hour after Portilla received the execution order from Santa Anna, he received another order from General Urrea to "Treat the prisoners with consideration, particularly their leader, Fannin, and to employ them in rebuilding Goliad."

At sunrise the able bodied men were formed in three groups and under very heavy guard taken out of the fort. One group was taken out on the San Antonio road, another on the Victoria road, and the other on the Copano road. The prisoners had little suspicion of their fate because each group had been given a different story as to where they were going. One group told that they were going to gather wood, another to drive up cattle and the they they were going to the port of Copano. At selected spots on each of the three roads from one half to three-fourths of a mile from the fort, the groups were halted. After they halted, the guards on one side stepped through the ranks so that all the guards were on one side, they turned and fired at very close range. Those men where not killed ran and were pursued by the cavalry.

The soldiers then came back to the fort and executed the wounded. There were about forty of them. Colonel Fannin was saved until last. He was taken outside the chapel, blind folded and seated in a chair. He made three requests, not to be shot in the face, his personal possessions sent to his family and that he be given a Christian burial. He was shot in the face, an officer took his personal possessions and his body was burned along with many of the other bodies. Not all bodies were burned, some were left where they died. There were 342 men who died in the Goliad Massacre, which is almost twice the number of men who died at the Alamo and San Jacinto combined. Twenty-eight men did escape from the three massacre sites and seventeen men's lives were spared. It is from the accounts of the men who escaped and were spared that we know what happened at Presidio La Bahia. Francita Alavez, the Angel of Goliad and the wife of General Urrea saved the lives of a number of the men.

40 posted on 03/05/2010 6:21:38 AM PST by Rightly Biased (If Clinton was the first black president then Obama is the first black Jesus.)
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To: Little Bill

My great grandfather was a Mason and a Grand Wizard. My Grandfather was a 32 degree Mason and his daughter, my Mother, was in the teen organization (sorority?).

I was never brought into the fold and was discouraged from reading the Masonic *bible*. Still don’t know to this day why.

Maybe you would like to tell me where they teach about Freemasonry (in regard to US history) in school? Cause it isn’t obvious.

All I know is it’s some sort of secret society with even more secret members.


41 posted on 03/05/2010 11:59:24 AM PST by wolfcreek (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lsd7DGqVSIc)
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To: Texas Fossil

See post # 41 and please tell me where I would of learned anything about Freemasonry in school.

Going to school in central Texas back in the 70s, it was simply not talked about. (even in my own house)


42 posted on 03/05/2010 12:06:38 PM PST by wolfcreek (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lsd7DGqVSIc)
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To: wolfcreek
All I know is it’s some sort of secret society with even more secret members.

Membership is published (in this country). Although it is often described as a secret society, we have many public functions. Generally we have not sought publicity like many organizations. We have out faults like all organizations of men, but do not believe all the negative tripe you hear from outside groups. Many mis-informed religious groups have gone on witch hunts with little knowledge and a preconceived agenda.

An example was the Southern Baptist Convention 20 or so years ago. They payed to have an examination done by a researcher and then did not accept his conclusions because it did not meet their pre-conceived notions. I had exchanges with them then, because my family have been Southern Baptists for many generations and also Masons.

There is not a "Masonic Bible", I have one that is simply a KJV bible with some pages added related to freemasonry.

I have been a Mason since I was 21 and am now 62. I appologize to no man for my association. Feel much more confident of out positive contribution to Texas and this nation than I did when I was 21.

43 posted on 03/05/2010 12:32:16 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Alamo-Girl

Thought you might like this. Have a good one.


44 posted on 03/05/2010 12:36:40 PM PST by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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To: Texas Fossil
HARRIS, JOHN (1813–1836). John Harris, Alamo defender, was born in Kentucky in 1813 and lived in 1836 in Gonzales, Texas. He took part in the siege of Bexar and later served in the Bexar garrison in Capt. Robert Whiteqv's infantry company, the Bexar Guards. Sometime before the siege of the Alamo began, Harris returned to his home in Gonzales, where he was mustered into the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers on February 23, 1836. He returned to the Alamo with this group on March 1, 1836, and died in the battle of the Alamo five days later.

My GG Uncle

45 posted on 03/05/2010 12:55:41 PM PST by saminfl ( FUBO)
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To: Captain Beyond

Indeed. Thanks for the ping!


46 posted on 03/05/2010 9:32:15 PM PST by Alamo-Girl
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To: jla

“Whomever The Alamo’s caretakers are, (city of San Antonio?), they do a magnificent job.”

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas do - here’s their website.

http://drt-inc.org/


47 posted on 03/05/2010 9:38:07 PM PST by decal (The Key To Flexibility is Indecision)
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To: Texas56
I’m a 7th generation Texan...

I'm a naturalized Texan, but I've told my three kids that despite all my faults, they'll forever thank me for the following:

1. I made sure they were born in Texas, and

2. I taught them all how to swim.

Anything else is just icing on the cake.

48 posted on 03/07/2010 2:39:29 PM PST by Night Hides Not (If Dick Cheney = Darth Vader, then Joe Biden = Dark Helmet)
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To: Night Hides Not

What an awesome parent you are!!!


49 posted on 03/07/2010 4:25:34 PM PST by Texas56
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