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75th anniversary of the start of the famine that killed 10 million in the Ukrainian Genocide/Famine/
Kyiv Post ^

Posted on 03/06/2010 7:28:45 PM PST by toshut

The anniversary of Holodomor - or Death by Hunger as it is known here - where individuals light candles to remember family and frieds who died...10 million lives were lost. The famine was orchestrated by dictator Josef Stalin to force peasants to give up their land and join collective farms and Ukraine, known as the breadbasket of the Soviet Union, suffered the most.

(Excerpt) Read more at kyivpost.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Extended News; Government; Russia
KEYWORDS: communism; famine; genocide; ukraine

1 posted on 03/06/2010 7:28:45 PM PST by toshut
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To: toshut

When the Komsomol killed the nightingales to keep
the Ukranians from knowing spring had come bump.


2 posted on 03/06/2010 7:31:04 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: toshut

I think it was a bit more than 10 million who were murder by starvation by the hand of Stalin.


3 posted on 03/06/2010 7:33:54 PM PST by Jack Hydrazine
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To: toshut
There is no famine or actual starvation nor is there likely to be.
Walter Duranty

4 posted on 03/06/2010 7:35:06 PM PST by Paleo Conservative
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To: toshut
Been a while since this topic has come up. I recommend The Black Book of Communism for details of this famine.

It is an academic book, very dry, but very full of facts. One of the main discussions of the book dealt with whether the failed agrarian reform pogroms were purposeful attempts to subjugate the masses.

5 posted on 03/06/2010 7:35:13 PM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: tet68

Hard to plant when your grain quota includes seizing your seed for that crop.


6 posted on 03/06/2010 7:36:52 PM PST by USNBandit (sarcasm engaged at all times)
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To: Paleo Conservative
ah Mr Duranty, you have come to collect your rubles for the wonderfully inventive articles you wrote as propaganda for the A$$ kissing left media in honor of uncle Joe...
7 posted on 03/06/2010 7:41:51 PM PST by toshut
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To: Paleo Conservative

Pinch Sulzberger and the New York Times still refuse to repudiate Walter Duranty and his Pulitzer Prize.


8 posted on 03/06/2010 7:44:45 PM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: toshut

I believe they light something like 25,000 candles to commemorate the 25,000 who died daily.
It’s crazy to me how few people have heard of the Holodomor.


9 posted on 03/06/2010 7:45:49 PM PST by Katya (Homo Nosce Te Ipsum)
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To: Paleo Conservative
Who ya gonna believe, The Kyev Post or The New York Times? Ah, never mind.
10 posted on 03/06/2010 7:47:00 PM PST by BallyBill (WARNING:Taking me serious could cause stress related illness.)
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To: Katya
Yes Katya,

25,000 candles representing the number that died each day....due to Stalin and his system.

And today we have Russia “CELEBRATING” Stalin's anniversary. Totally insane

11 posted on 03/06/2010 7:48:16 PM PST by toshut
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To: toshut
What I find interesting is that every major famine of the 20th Century was caused by war or deliberate government policy. What happened in the Ukraine may have resulted in 14 MILLION dead from either deliberate starvation or exile in the gulag system in Siberia. This is bigger than what the Nazi concentration camps did between 1933 and 1945.
12 posted on 03/06/2010 8:06:09 PM PST by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
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To: toshut

Lots of Jew-bashing in the comments. Putrid.


13 posted on 03/06/2010 8:08:19 PM PST by piytar (Ammo is hard to find! Bought some lately? Please share where at www.ammo-finder.com)
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To: USNBandit

Hmm, kind of like obama’s failed economic, national defense, and foreign relation policies being intentional, for the purpose of wrecking America?


14 posted on 03/06/2010 8:13:59 PM PST by piytar (Ammo is hard to find! Bought some lately? Please share where at www.ammo-finder.com)
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To: piytar

Oops, to be clear, I’m referring to the comments at the linked article, not here.


15 posted on 03/06/2010 8:15:06 PM PST by piytar (Ammo is hard to find! Bought some lately? Please share where at www.ammo-finder.com)
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To: Katya; toshut

o pripominat’

A.A.C.


16 posted on 03/06/2010 8:15:33 PM PST by AmericanArchConservative (Armour on, Lances high, Swords out, Bows drawn, Shields front ... Eagles UP!)
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To: toshut

IIRC the top few hundred leaders, intellectuals and artists were killed outright.


17 posted on 03/06/2010 8:16:57 PM PST by votemout
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To: votemout
http://www.infoukes.com/history/famine/harvest_of_despair/

Harvest of Despair

18 posted on 03/06/2010 8:19:22 PM PST by votemout
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To: toshut

bm


19 posted on 03/06/2010 8:33:22 PM PST by Para-Ord.45
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To: toshut

20 posted on 03/06/2010 8:39:49 PM PST by Fred Nerks (Fair dinkum!)
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To: toshut
RE: Walter Duranty, the "principal New York Times correspondent in the U.S.S.R"

Ukraine Famine - 1932-1933 - 7,000,000 Deaths

Joseph Stalin, leader of the Soviet Union, set in motion events designed to cause a famine in the Ukraine to destroy the people there seeking independence from his rule. As a result, an estimated 7,000,000 persons perished in this farming area, known as the breadbasket of Europe, with the people deprived of the food they had grown with their own hands.

http://www.unitedhumanrights.org/Genocide/Ukraine_famine.htm

____________________________________________________________

Prize Specimen
The campaign to revoke Walter Duranty’s Pulitzer.

Andrew Stuttaford
May 7, 2003

We will never know how many Ukrainians died in Stalin's famines of the early 1930s. As Nikita Khrushchev later recalled, "No one was keeping count." Writing back in the mid- 1980s, historian Robert Conquest came up with a death toll of around six million, a calculation not so inconsistent with later research (the writers of The Black Book of Communism (1999) estimated a total of four million for 1933 alone).

Four million, six million, seven million, when the numbers are this grotesque does the exact figure matter? Just remember this instead:

The first family to die was the Rafalyks — father, mother and a child. Later on the Fediy family of five also perished of starvation. Then followed the families of Prokhar Lytvyn (four persons), Fedir Hontowy (three persons), Samson Fediy (three persons). The second child of the latter family was beaten to death on somebody's onion patch. Mykola and Larion Fediy died, followed by Andrew Fediy and his wife; Stefan Fediy; Anton Fediy, his wife and four children (his two other little girls survived); Boris Fediy, his wife and three children: Olanviy Fediy and his wife; Taras Fediy and his wife; Theodore Fesenko; Constantine Fesenko; Melania Fediy; Lawrenty Fediy; Peter Fediy; Eulysis Fediy and his brother Fred; Isidore Fediy, his wife and two children; Ivan Hontowy, his wife and two children; Vasyl Perch, his wife and child; Makar Fediy; Prokip Fesenko: Abraham Fediy; Ivan Skaska, his wife and eight children.

Some of these people were buried in a cemetery plot; others were left lying wherever they died. For instance, Elizabeth Lukashenko died on the meadow; her remains were eaten by ravens. Others were simply dumped into any handy excavation. The remains of Lawrenty Fediy lay on the hearth of his dwelling until devoured by rats.*

And that's just one village — Fediivka, in the Poltava Province.

We will never know whether Walter Duranty, the principal New York Times correspondent in the U.S.S.R., ever visited Fediivka. Almost certainly not. What we do know is that, in March 1933, while telling his readers that there had indeed been "serious food shortages" in the Ukraine, he was quick to reassure them that "there [was] no actual starvation." There had been no "deaths from starvation," he soothed, merely "widespread mortality from diseases due to malnutrition." So that was all right then.

But, unlike Khrushchev, Duranty, a Pulitzer Prize winner, no less, was keeping count — in the autumn of 1933 he is recorded as having told the British Embassy that ten million had died. ** "The Ukraine," he said, "had been bled white," remarkable words from the journalist who had, only days earlier, described talk of a famine as "a sheer absurdity," remarkable words from the journalist who, in a 1935 memoir had dismayingly little to say about one of history's greatest crimes. Writing about his two visits to the Ukraine in 1933, Duranty was content to describe how "the people looked healthier and more cheerful than [he] had expected, although they told grim tales of their sufferings in the past two years." As Duranty had explained (writing about his trip to the Ukraine in April that year), he "had no doubt that the solution to the agrarian problem had been found".

Well, at least he didn't refer to it as a "final" solution.

As the years passed, and the extent of the famine and the other, innumerable, brutalities of Stalin's long tyranny became increasingly difficult to deny, Duranty's reputation collapsed (I wrote about this on NRO a couple of years ago), but his Pulitzer Prize has endured.

Ah, that Pulitzer Prize. In his will old Joseph Pulitzer described what the prize was designed to achieve: " The encouragement of public service, public morals, American literature, and the advancement of education."

In 1932 the Pulitzer Board awarded Walter Duranty its prize. It's an achievement that the New York Times still celebrates. The gray lady is pleased to publish its storied Pulitzer roster in a full-page advertisement each year, and, clearly, it finds the name of Duranty as one that is still fit to print. His name is near the top of the list, an accident of chronology, but there it is, Duranty, Times man, denier of the Ukrainian genocide — proudly paraded for all to see. Interestingly, the list of prizewinners posted on the New York Times Company's website is more forthcoming: Against Duranty's name, it is noted that "other writers in the Times and elsewhere have discredited this coverage."

Understandably enough, Duranty's Pulitzer is an insult that has lost none of its power to appall. In a new initiative, Ukrainian groups have launched a fresh campaign designed to persuade the Pulitzer Prize Board to revoke the award to Duranty. The Pulitzer's nabobs do not appear to be impressed. A message dated April 29, 2003 from the board's administrator to one of the organizers of the Ukrainian campaign includes the following words:

The current Board is aware that complaints about the Duranty award have surfaced again. [The campaign's] submission…will be placed on file with others we have received. However, to date, the Board has not seen fit to reverse a previous Board's decision, made seventy years ago in a different era and under different circumstances.

A "different era," "different circumstances" — would that have been said, I wonder, about someone who had covered up Nazi savagery? But then, more relevantly, the Pulitzer's representative notes that Duranty's prize was awarded "for a specific set of stories in 1931," in other words, before the famine struck with its full, horrific, force. And there he has a point. The prize is designed to reward a specific piece of journalism — not a body of work. To strip Duranty of the prize on the grounds of his subsequent conduct, however disgusting it may have been, would be a retrospective change of the rules, behavior more typical of the old U.S.S.R. than today's U.S.A.

But what was that "specific set of stories?" Duranty won his prize " for [his] dispatches on Russia especially the working out of the Five Year Plan." They were, said the Pulitzer Board "marked by scholarship, profundity, impartiality, sound judgment and exceptional clarity…."

Really? As summarized by S. J. Taylor in her excellent — and appropriately titled — biography of Duranty, Stalin's Apologist, the statement with which Duranty accepted his prize gives some hint of the "sound judgment" contained in his dispatches.

""Despite present imperfections," he continued, he had come to realize there was something very good about the Soviets' "planned system of economy." And there was something more: Duranty had learned, he said, "to respect the Soviet leaders, especially Stalin, who [had grown] into a really great statesman.""

In truth, of course, this was simply nonsense, a distortion that, in some ways bore even less resemblance to reality than "Jimmy's World," the tale of an eight-year-old junkie that, briefly, won a Pulitzer for Janet Cooke of the Washington Post. Tragic "Jimmy" turned out not to exist. He was a concoction, a fiction, nothing more. The Post did the right thing — Cooke's prize was rapidly returned.

After 70 years the New York Times has yet to do the right thing. There is, naturally, always room for disagreement over how events are interpreted, particularly in an era of revolutionary change, but Duranty's writings clearly tipped over into propaganda, and, often, outright deception, a cynical sugarcoating of the squalor of a system in which he almost certainly didn't believe. His motivation seems to have been purely opportunistic, access to the Moscow "story" for the Times and the well-paid lifestyle and the fame ("the Great Duranty" was, some said, the best-known journalist in the world) that this brought. Too much criticism of Stalin's rule and this privileged existence would end. Duranty's "Stalin" was a lie, not much more genuine than Janet Cooke's "Jimmy" and, as he well knew at the time, so too were the descriptions of the Soviet experiment that brought him that Pulitzer.

And if that is not enough to make the Pulitzer Board to reconsider withdrawing an award that disgraces both the name of Joseph Pulitzer and his prize, it is up to the New York Times to insist that it does so.

*From an account quoted in Robert Conquest's The Harvest of Sorrow.

** On another occasion (a dinner party, ironically) that autumn Duranty talked about seven million deaths.

http://www.nationalreview.com/stuttaford/stuttaford050703.asp

21 posted on 03/06/2010 8:47:16 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: Fred Nerks

Thanks, Fred! Chilling article (headline and photos). I’d like to read the article, but the text is way too tiny. Do you have a link? Maybe there’s an option there for enlarging it. Screen enlargement or zoom on our end probably wouldn’t result in readable text.


22 posted on 03/06/2010 8:54:06 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: ETL

http://anti-communism.net/

I don’t know how to enlarge, but here’s the link.


23 posted on 03/06/2010 9:08:05 PM PST by Fred Nerks (Fair dinkum!)
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To: toshut
The NY Times and Time Magazine: Covering up the unspeakable atrocities and total inhumanity of socialism for 75 years.


24 posted on 03/06/2010 9:12:14 PM PST by FormerACLUmember (The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule. - H. L. Menken.)
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To: Fred Nerks

Thanks. I’m not sure if the text they have there at the site is from that news clipping or not. But I found another site which definitely has the correct text.

http://www.garethjones.org/soviet_articles/thomas_walker/walker_six%20million_perish_in_soviet_famine.htm


25 posted on 03/06/2010 9:27:18 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: toshut
Yet no Holywood producer,......70 years after the fact, would ever dare make a movie criricizing Uncle Joe. Now that is loyalty.
26 posted on 03/06/2010 9:32:10 PM PST by cookcounty (Let us not speak of the honor of men. Rather, let us bind them with the Constitution. --Jefferson)
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To: cookcounty
Yet no Holywood producer,......70 years after the fact, would ever dare make a movie criricizing Uncle Joe. Now that is loyalty.

A brilliant point.

Instead we get unwatchable visual feces praising Che and other commie scum.

27 posted on 03/06/2010 9:39:06 PM PST by FormerACLUmember (The urge to save humanity is almost always a false front for the urge to rule. - H. L. Menken.)
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To: toshut
You all should investigate Holocaust by Bullets by a French priest who has been uncovering the story of the Nazi slaughtering of Jews in the Ukraine, village by village.

They would drive into the village with a list of the Jews, press local Ukrainians into service clearing land somewhere adjacent to the town, dig a mass grave, line them up, and kill them one by one, one bullet per to keep costs down. Each night the grave would be covered.

Many of the people now giving eyewitness testimony, having kept it in secret all these years, remember the ground moving: many were still alive.

Often tables would be set up right next to these graves where the Nazis would eat and drink through the night.

The murders numbered at least a million by estimates at this point. The Ukraine has suffered tragically with this and under Stalin's genocide. I teach high school and there is an adopted Ukrainian girl in my class who may be returning this summer for the first time. She has a deep connection and drinks in all information about this tragic land.

I cover the starvation holocaust and the trip by Duranty to whitewash Stalin's attrocities in World History, and I always ask students to go home and ask their parents why no one knows of this.
28 posted on 03/06/2010 9:49:34 PM PST by jobim
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To: jobim

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Duranty


29 posted on 03/06/2010 10:20:27 PM PST by packrat35 (Democrat Healthcare is a 9-11 Attack on the Constitution)
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To: ETL

excerpt:

...Starting from Moscow late in the Spring of 1934 on what was advertised by the Intourist Travel Bureau as a complete tour of the Ukraine, we first went to a large Collective Farm near Tambov. Honesty compels me to state that this was indeed a model farm.

Conversation with the workers on this farm established the facts that practically all these people were immigrant Communists from either America, England or Germany, who had eve brought their farming implements with them, at their own expense, from abroad.

I HOPE THEY ALL ENDED UP IN THE GULAGS!

At the railway station at Veronezh I asked a glib-tongued Intourist guide why so many hundreds of persons were sleeping in the railway station-why were they in rags, and why did they have such agonizing looks on their faces.

To which he replied:

“They were sleeping in the railway station because they were all workers from a factory near-by and are leaving today for their month’s holiday in the Crimea, which also accounts for their old clothing, being on holiday and having sat up all night so as not to miss the train, naturally they looked tired”.

I THINK THIS GUIDE MUST STILL BE ALIVE, HE’S POSTING HERE ON FR TELLING US HOW WONDERFUL THE HOPE AND CHANGE IS UNDER OBAMA!

The look of agony and intense misery on all the faces of these misery [sic] did not bespeak of any forthcoming holidays in the Crimea. Questioning a few of these peasants convinced me that we tourists are being shown only the rosy side of a very horrible condition.

THANKS for the link to the text! Aint REVOLUTION the best!


30 posted on 03/06/2010 10:53:27 PM PST by Fred Nerks (Fair dinkum!)
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To: packrat35

That’s a surprisingly incisive and informative summary of Duranty and the issues pertaining to him from the dreaded wikipedia.


31 posted on 03/06/2010 10:54:08 PM PST by jobim
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To: Fred Nerks

Thanks. I’ll take a closer look sometime tomorrow. Now 2AM here in NY.


32 posted on 03/06/2010 10:58:54 PM PST by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: jobim

I know wiki isn’t perfect but it is suprisingly good for many uses. I would never use it as a source for any official document, but it does have its uses.


33 posted on 03/06/2010 11:19:06 PM PST by packrat35 (Democrat Healthcare is a 9-11 Attack on the Constitution)
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To: jobim

A good book if you can find it is “Execution by hunger.”
by Miron Dolot, a first person account of collectivisation
and the terror famine.

Note the collectivization was started by “community activists” entering the villages and getting a few
villagers to join, then forcing them to coerce the
others. The government during the famine also
had special stores that took gold in exchange for
food. Of course when the villagers returned home
the Komsomol was waiting for them to search their
homes for “the rest of the gold”.
villagers were reduced to cannabalism during the
worst of the winter.
Dolot lays it all out in the open.


34 posted on 03/07/2010 10:20:38 AM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: packrat35; All

Here is a better analysis by the NYT and the Pulitzer committe on the lies of Duranty during the 1930s, when he was wined and dined by the commie heads.

Notice they admit that Duranty and his articles were lies, but they do not revoke the award.

kind of makes you think of the Nobel Peace Prize....

http://www.pulitzer.org/durantypressrelease

http://www.nytco.com/company/awards/statement.html


35 posted on 03/07/2010 11:40:39 AM PST by toshut
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To: toshut

It sure does.


36 posted on 03/07/2010 11:50:42 AM PST by yield 2 the right (GO USA! BRING HOME SOME GOLD!)
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