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TRAVEL WARNING: MEXICO
Travel.State.Gov - UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF STATE - Burea of Consular Affairs ^ | March 14, 2010 | n/a

Posted on 03/14/2010 3:25:07 PM PDT by Cindy

Note: The following text is a quote:

Travel Warning United States Department of State Bureau of Consular Affairs Washington, DC 20520

This information is current as of today, Sun Mar 14 2010 15:23:05 GMT-0700 (PDT).

MEXICO

March 14, 2010

The Department of State has issued this Travel Warning to inform U.S. citizens traveling to and living in Mexico of concerns about the security situation in Mexico, and that it has authorized the departure of the dependents of U.S. government personnel from U.S. consulates in the Northern Mexican border cities of Tijuana, Nogales, Ciudad Juarez, Nuevo Laredo, Monterrey and Matamoros until April 12. Family members of US Government personnel assigned to other areas of Mexico outside the Mexican border states are not affected by this departure measure. This Travel Warning supercedes that of February 22, 2010, and announces the authorized departure of some dependents and updates security incidents.

While millions of U.S. citizens safely visit Mexico each year (including tens of thousands who cross the land border daily for study, tourism or business and nearly one million U.S. citizens who live in Mexico), violence in the country has increased. It is imperative that U.S. citizens understand the risks in Mexico, how best to avoid dangerous situations, and who to contact if victimized. Common-sense precautions such as visiting only legitimate business and tourist areas during daylight hours, and avoiding areas where prostitution and drug dealing might occur, can help ensure that travel to Mexico is safe and enjoyable.

Recent violent attacks have prompted the U.S. Embassy to urge U.S. citizens to delay unnecessary travel to parts of Durango, Coahuila and Chihuahua states(see details below) and advise U.S. citizens residing or traveling in those areas to exercise extreme caution. Drug cartels and associated criminal elements have retaliated violently against individuals who speak out against them or whom they otherwise view as a threat to their organizations. These attacks include the abduction and murder of two resident U.S. citizens in Chihuahua.

Violence Along the U.S. - Mexico Border

Mexican drug cartels are engaged in violent conflict - both among themselves and with Mexican security services - for control of narcotics trafficking routes along the U.S.-Mexico border. To combat violence, the government of Mexico has deployed military troops throughout the country. U.S. citizens should cooperate fully with official checkpoints when traveling on Mexican highways.

Some recent confrontations between Mexican authorities and drug cartel members have resembled small-unit combat, with cartels employing automatic weapons and grenades. Large firefights have taken place in towns and cities across Mexico, but occur mostly in northern Mexico, including Ciudad Juarez, Tijuana, Chihuahua City, Nogales, Matamoros, Reynosa and Monterrey. During some of these incidents, U.S. citizens have been trapped and temporarily prevented from leaving the area. The U.S. Mission in Mexico currently restricts its U.S. government employees’ travel within the state of Durango, the northwest quadrant of the state of Chihuahua and an area southeast of Ciudad Juarez, and all parts of the state of Coahuila south of Mexican Highways 25 and 22 and the Alamos River. This restriction was implemented in light of a recent increase in assaults, murders, and kidnappings in those three states.

The situation in northern Mexico remains fluid; the location and timing of future armed engagements cannot be predicted. Recently, the cities of Durango and Gomez Palacio in the state of Durango, and the area known as “La Laguna” in the state of Coahuila, which includes the city of Torreon, experienced sharp increases in violence. In late 2009 and early 2010, four visiting U.S. citizens were murdered in Gomez Palacio, Durango. These and several other unsolved murders in the state of Durango have caused particular concern.

A number of areas along the border continue to experience a rapid growth in crime. Robberies, homicides, petty thefts, and carjackings have all increased over the last year across Mexico, with notable spikes in Chihuahua, Sinaloa, and northern Baja California. Ciudad Juarez, Tijuana and Nogales are among the cities that have experienced public shootouts during daylight hours in shopping centers and other public venues. Criminals have followed and harassed U.S. citizens traveling in their vehicles in border areas including Nuevo Laredo, Matamoros, and Tijuana. Travelers on the highways between Monterrey and other parts of Mexico to the United States (notably through Nuevo Laredo and Matamoros) have been targeted for robbery and violence and have also inadvertently been caught in incidents of gunfire between criminals and Mexican law enforcement. Such incidents are more likely to occur at night but may occur at any time.

The situation in the state of Chihuahua, specifically Ciudad Juarez, is of special concern. The U.S. Consulate General recommends that American citizens defer non-essential travel to the Guadalupe Bravo area southeast of Ciudad Juarez and to the northwest quarter of the state of Chihuahua including the city of Nuevo Casas Grandes and surrounding communities. From the United States, these areas are often reached through the Columbus, NM, and Fabens and Fort Hancock, TX, ports of entry. In both areas, American citizens have been victims of drug-related violence.

Mexican authorities report that more than 2,600 people were killed in Ciudad Juarez in 2009. Additionally, this city of 1.3 million people experienced more than 16,000 car thefts and 1,900 carjackings in 2009. U.S. citizens should pay close attention to their surroundings while traveling in Ciudad Juarez, avoid isolated locations during late night and early morning hours, and remain alert to news reports. Visa and other service seekers visiting the Consulate are encouraged to make arrangements to pay for those services using a non-cash method.

U.S. citizens are urged to be alert to safety and security concerns when visiting the border region. Criminals are armed with a wide array of sophisticated weapons. In some cases, assailants have worn full or partial police or military uniforms and have used vehicles that resemble police vehicles. While most crime victims are Mexican citizens, the uncertain security situation poses serious risks for U.S. citizens as well. U.S. citizen victims of crime in Mexico are urged to contact the consular section of the nearest U.S. consulate or Embassy for advice and assistance. Contact information is provided at the end of this message.

Crime and Violence Throughout Mexico

U.S. citizens traveling throughout Mexico should exercise caution in unfamiliar areas and be aware of their surroundings at all times. Bystanders have been injured or killed in violent attacks in cities across the country, demonstrating the heightened risk of violence in public places. In recent years, dozens of U.S. citizens living in Mexico have been kidnapped and most of their cases remain unsolved. U.S. citizens who believe they are being targeted for kidnapping or other crimes should notify Mexican law enforcement officials and the U.S. Embassy in Mexico City or the nearest U.S. consulate as soon as possible. Any U.S. visitor who suspects they are a target should consider returning to the United States immediately. U.S. citizens should be aware that many cases of violent crime are never resolved by Mexican law enforcement, and the U.S. government has no authority to investigate crimes committed in Mexico.

U.S. citizens should make every attempt to travel on main roads during daylight hours, particularly the toll ("cuota") roads, which generally are more secure. When warranted, the U.S. Embassy and consulates advise their employees as well as private U.S. citizens to avoid certain areas, abstain from driving on certain roads because of dangerous conditions or criminal activity, or recommend driving during daylight hours only. When this happens, the Embassy or the affected consulate will alert the local U.S. citizen Warden network and post the information on their respective websites, indicating the nature of the concern and the expected time period for which the restriction will remain in place.

U.S. citizen visitors are encouraged to stay in the well-known tourist areas. Travelers should leave their itinerary with a friend or family member not traveling with them, avoid traveling alone, and check with their cellular phone service providers prior to departure to confirm that their cell phone is capable of roaming on GSM or 3G international networks. Do not display expensive-looking jewelry, large amounts of money, or other valuable items. Travelers to remote or isolated hunting or fishing venues should be aware of their distance from appropriate medical, law enforcement, and consular services in an emergency situation.

Demonstrations and Large Public Gatherings

Demonstrations occur frequently throughout Mexico and usually are peaceful. However, even demonstrations intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate to violence unexpectedly. Violent demonstrations have resulted in deaths, including that of an American citizen in Oaxaca in 2006. In 2008, a Mexican Independence Day celebration was the target of a violent attack. During demonstrations or law enforcement operations, U.S. citizens are advised to remain in their homes or hotels, avoid large crowds, and avoid the downtown and surrounding areas. Since the timing and routes of scheduled marches and demonstrations are always subject to change, U.S. citizens should monitor local media sources for new developments and exercise extreme caution while within the vicinity of protests.

The Mexican Constitution prohibits political activities by foreigners, and such actions may result in detention and/or deportation. U.S. citizens are therefore advised to avoid participating in demonstrations or other activities that might be deemed political by Mexican authorities. As is always the case in any large gathering, U.S. citizens should remain alert to their surroundings.

Further Information

For more detailed information on staying safe in Mexico, please see the Mexico Country Specific Information. Information on security and travel to popular tourist destinations is also provided in the publication: "Spring Break in Mexico- Know Before You Go!!"

For the latest security information, U.S. citizens traveling abroad should regularly monitor the Department's internet web site at http://travel.state.gov/ where the current Worldwide Caution, Travel Warnings, and Travel Alerts can be found. Up-to-date information on security can also be obtained by calling 1-888-407-4747 toll free in the United States and Canada, or, for callers from Mexico, a regular toll line at 001-202-501-4444. These numbers are available from 8:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday (except U.S. federal holidays). American citizens traveling or residing overseas are encouraged to register with the appropriate U.S. Embassy or Consulate on the State Department's travel registration website at https://travelregistration.state.gov/.

For any emergencies involving U.S. citizens in Mexico, please contact the U.S. Embassy or the closest U.S. Consulate. The numbers provided below for the Embassy and Consulates are available around the clock. The U.S. Embassy is located in Mexico City at Paseo de la Reforma 305, Colonia Cuauhtemoc, telephone from the United States: 011-52-55-5080-2000; telephone within Mexico City: 5080-2000; telephone long distance within Mexico 01-55-5080-2000. You may also contact the Embassy by e-mail at: ACSMexicoCity@state.gov The Embassy's internet address is http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/.

Consulates:

Ciudad Juarez: Paseo de la Victoria 3650, tel. (011)(52)(656) 227-3000. http://ciudadjuarez.usconsulate.gov/.

Guadalajara: Progreso 175, telephone (011)(52)(333) 268-2100. http://guadalajara.usconsulate.gov/.

Hermosillo: Avenida Monterrey 141, telephone (011)(52)(662) 289-3500. http://hermosillo.usconsulate.gov/.

Matamoros: Avenida Primera 2002, telephone (011)(52)(868) 812-4402. http://matamoros.usconsulate.gov/.

Merida: Calle 60 no. 338-K x 29 y 31, Col. Alcala Martin, Merida, Yucatan, Mexico 97050, telephone (011)(52)(999) 942-5700 or 202-250-3711 (U.S. number). http://merida.usconsulate.gov/.

Monterrey: Avenida Constitucion 411 Poniente, telephone (011)(52)(818) 047-3100. http://monterrey.usconsulate.gov/.

Nogales: Calle San Jose, Nogales, Sonora, telephone (011)(52)(631) 311-8150. http://nogales.usconsulate.gov/.

Nuevo Laredo: Calle Allende 3330, col. Jardin, telephone (011)(52)(867) 714-0512. http://nuevolaredo.usconsulate.gov/.

Tijuana: Tapachula 96, telephone (011)(52)(664) 622-7400. http://tijuana.usconsulate.gov/service.html.

Consular Agencies:

Acapulco: Hotel Continental Emporio, Costera Miguel Aleman 121 - local 14, telephone (011)(52)(744) 484-0300 or (011)(52)(744) 469-0556.

Cabo San Lucas: Blvd. Marina local c-4, Plaza Nautica, col. Centro, telephone (011)(52)(624) 143-3566.

Cancún: Plaza Caracol two, second level, no. 320-323, Boulevard Kukulcan, km. 8.5, Zona Hotelera, telephone (011)(52)(998) 883-0272 or, 202-640-2511 (a U.S. number).

Ciudad Acuña: Closed until further notice.

Cozumel: Plaza Villa Mar en el Centro, Plaza Principal, (Parque Juárez between Melgar and 5th ave.) 2nd floor, locales #8 and 9, telephone (011)(52)(987) 872-4574 or, 202-459-4661 (a U.S. number).

Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo: Hotel Fontan, Blvd. Ixtapa, telephone (011)(52)(755) 553-2100.

Mazatlán: Playa Gaviotas #202, Zona Dorada, telephone (011)(52)(669) 916-5889.

Oaxaca: Macedonio Alcalá no. 407, interior 20, telephone (011)(52)(951) 514-3054, (011) (52)(951) 516-2853.

Piedras Negras: Abasolo #211, Zona Centro, Piedras Negras, Coah., Tel. (011)(52)(878) 782-5586.

Playa del Carmen: "The Palapa," Calle 1 Sur, between Avenida 15 and Avenida 20, telephone (011)(52)(984) 873-0303 or 202-370-6708(a U.S. number).

Puerto Vallarta: Paradise Plaza, Paseo de los Cocoteros #1, Local #4, Interior #17, Nuevo Vallarta, Nayarit, telephone (011)(52)(322) 222-0069.

Reynosa: Calle Monterrey #390, Esq. Sinaloa, Colonia Rodríguez, telephone: (011)(52)(899) 923 - 9331.

San Luis Potosí: Edificio "Las Terrazas", Avenida Venustiano Carranza 2076-41, Col. Polanco, telephone: (011)(52)(444) 811-7802/7803.

San Miguel de Allende: Dr. Hernandez Macias #72, telephone (011)(52)(415) 152-2357 or (011)(52)(415) 152-0068.


TOPICS: Crime/Corruption; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; Government; Mexico; US: California; US: Texas
KEYWORDS: acosta; acostahernandez; ba; bablazo; barrioazteca; catton; caudillo; ceniceros; chihuahua; ciudadjuarez; consulate; diego; dienton; diez; drugcartel; drugcartels; drugtrafficking; embassy; enriquez; enriquezcatton; gang; gangs; hernandez; illicitdrugs; immigrantlist; immigration; joelacaudillo; joseantonio; juarez; juarezdrugcartel; juarezplaza; killingamericans; lalinea; mexico; narcoterror; redelfs; salcido; stayoutofmexico; travelwarning; usconsulate; usembassy; vcf; war; warnextdoor; wod; wot
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1 posted on 03/14/2010 3:25:08 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

https://www.osac.gov/Reports/report.cfm?contentID=114997

YOU ARE HERE: Home > Reports > Consular Affairs Bulletins > Report
Travel Warning: Mexico
CONSULAR AFFAIRS BULLETINS
Americas - Mexico
14 Mar 2010


2 posted on 03/14/2010 3:26:11 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

Previously...

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2323051/posts

Travel Alert [Mexico]
U.S. DEPARTMENT OF STATE Bureau of Consular Affairs - Travel Alert ^ | August 20, 2009 | n/a
Posted on August 24, 2009 1:05:47 AM PDT by Cindy


3 posted on 03/14/2010 3:27:27 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

Remember when you could sleep on the beach there without any problems?


4 posted on 03/14/2010 3:28:47 PM PDT by mylife (Opinions...$1 Halfbaked...50c)
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To: All

Related Link:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2470810/posts

“Obama “outraged” by consulate murders in Mexico”
Reuters ^ | March 14, 2010
Posted on March 14, 2010 9:45:58 AM PDT by Free ThinkerNY


5 posted on 03/14/2010 3:29:03 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

En espanol:
http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/main.html

#

In English:

http://mexico.usembassy.gov/eng/citizen_services.html


6 posted on 03/14/2010 3:31:12 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: mylife

Even when I was young, Mexico (Tijuana and Baja) were always dangerous. Liberalism and drug demand in the US have fueled lawlessness in Mexico.

So, let’s let every Mexican loser and criminal across the border. That will help Mexico become a safer place!!!


7 posted on 03/14/2010 3:31:59 PM PDT by whitedog57
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To: All

Note to the Media, Researchers and Analysts:

Click on FreeRepublic Key Word “Mexico” for information and personal views Mexico:

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/mexico/index


8 posted on 03/14/2010 3:33:20 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

I thought Mexico was a socialist utopia!


9 posted on 03/14/2010 3:33:40 PM PDT by Jack Hydrazine
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To: whitedog57

Baja wasn’t that bad.

All the border towns suck


10 posted on 03/14/2010 3:34:28 PM PDT by mylife (Opinions...$1 Halfbaked...50c)
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To: mylife

Yes I do.
45 years ago use to go deep in to Baja with the folks and do just that.
Now I wouldn’t go to the country.


11 posted on 03/14/2010 3:39:55 PM PDT by Joe Boucher (Just say NO to RINOs. (FUBO))
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To: Cindy

Those towns cover more than the northern states; in fact, that is pretty much all of Mexico, including San Miguel de Allende, which is a large American ex-pat settlement. The State Dept. must have received specific threats on all of those towns and areas. Might as well throw in southern California too!!!


12 posted on 03/14/2010 3:41:35 PM PDT by La Enchiladita (wise gringa)
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To: Joe Boucher

I used to as recently as 20 years ago.

I had wonderful times.


13 posted on 03/14/2010 3:42:31 PM PDT by mylife (Opinions...$1 Halfbaked...50c)
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To: All

ADDING to post no. 5:

http://www.latimes.com/news/nation-and-world/la-fgw-mexico-shootings15-2010mar15,0,1698276.story

“3 killed in drug-related shootings in Mexico”

SNIPPET: “A U.S. Consulate worker and his wife, as well as another consulate employee, are dead, officials say. Also, 13 people are slain in Acapulco just as spring break brings an influx of visitors.”

By Tracy Wilkinson
March 14, 2010 | 1:08 p.m.
Reporting from Mexico City

SNIPPET: “Three people associated with the U.S. Consulate in the Mexican border city of Ciudad Juárez have been killed in drive-by shootings, U.S. officials said Sunday. Two of the dead were U.S. citizens, and the third was the Mexican spouse of a consulate employee.”

SNIPPET: “More than 18,000 people have been killed in Mexico since President Calderón deployed the army to battle cartels in December 2006.”


14 posted on 03/14/2010 3:42:48 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

Note to the Media, Researchers and Analysts:

Click on FreeRepublic Key Words “Ciudad Juarez” and “Juarez” for information and personal views Ciudad Juarez:

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/ciudadjuarez/index

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/juarez/index


15 posted on 03/14/2010 3:45:22 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: La Enchiladita

California and Arizona.


16 posted on 03/14/2010 3:49:41 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

http://www.dhs.gov/files/bordersecurity.shtm

Note: The following text is a quote:

http://www.dhs.gov/files/reportincidents/

Report Incidents
Everyone should be vigilant, take notice of your surroundings, and report suspicious items or activities to local authorities immediately.
Suspected Criminal or Terror Activity

Report any suspected criminal or terrorist activity to the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI).
Online report to FBI Tips
Local FBI Field Offices
International FBI Offices
Immigration or Customs Violations

Report suspected immigration or customs violations to Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).
Report suspicious activity by calling 1-866-347-2423.

This page was last reviewed/modified on September 10, 2009.


17 posted on 03/14/2010 3:52:20 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: All

ICE.gov
http://www.ice.gov

“Report suspicious activity
1-866-DHS-2-ICE”


18 posted on 03/14/2010 3:52:54 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

I hope all the college students on spring break will be safe!


19 posted on 03/14/2010 3:54:32 PM PDT by MadelineZapeezda (Promoted by God to be a mother!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!...................Thanks, Susan!)
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To: Cindy

Well hey, bring all of the bloodsucking leeches up here so our politicians can give them the fruits of the legally employed peoples wages for votes.


20 posted on 03/14/2010 3:56:16 PM PDT by dforest
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To: Cindy

Well, which is more important to Mexico.......

The false teeth and eyeglass business or the drug trade?

The tourist business or the drug business?


21 posted on 03/14/2010 4:04:51 PM PDT by bert (K.E. N.P. +12 . Tax the poor. Taxes will give them a stake in society)
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To: All; AuntB

Thanks to Aunt B for this post I am reposting here.

Note: The following post is a quote:

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/2470870/posts?page=23#23

To: denydenydeny
“I’m really getting sick of having to read about American news events in the foreign press.”

It seems that’s what we’re up against. NAFBPO searches and translates all the news from south of the border daily.
It is a REAL eye opener!

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF FORMER BORDER PATROL OFFICERS
Visit our website: http://www.nafbpo.org
M3 Foreign news report. (Some on FR under keyword: NAFBPO)

This is the latest one:

Friday, 3/12/10

El Universal (Mexico City) 3/11/10

A multi-national plan

The government of Mexico and representatives from Belize, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Panama and the Dominican Republic signed an accord and set up a work group to combat the traffic in chemical precursors in the area, as well as to share information about the traffic routes of drugs, weapons and persons, with the object of confronting trans-national criminal organizations.

—-

U.S. Ambassador, again

The U.S. Ambassador to Mexico, Carlos Pascual, met with “parliament leaders of the (Mexican) Senate, and spoke about the Merida Initiative, immigration, weapons traffic and border security and violence.”

Senator Ricardo Monreal said that Ambassador Pascual informed them that “the presentation of a possible migratory reform in the U.S. is postponed at least until 2012 because this year there are elections in that country and it is an issue which generates much controversy, for which reason it will remain pending.”

[However, “Excelsior,” (another Mexico City paper,) reported on the same issue but said that Pascual told the Senators that the White House is analyzing a new initiative that would be made public after the elections.]

http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/665291.html

http://www.exonline.com.mx/diario/noticia/primera/
pulsonacional/no_habra_reforma_migratoria,_dice_pascual/889301

———————

El Tiempo, Secretaria de Prensa, (Bogota, Colombia) 3/11/10

An explosive find

Colombian military and personnel from the country’s equivalent to our Dep’t. of Justice detected and destroyed a ton and a half of R1, an explosive used to manufacture anti-personnel mines. (The event took place in a rural zone near Argelia, in the department (state) of Antioquia (some 35 mi. S.E. of Medellin).)

This amount would have been sufficient for 10,000 such mines. In the last three months, in Colombia, 7,077 kilos of explosives have been seized from “illegal armed groups.”

———————-

El Financiero (Mexico City) 3/11/10

Mexican officials are readying a project that could bring up to 500 Haitians to Mexico on a humanitarian visa program to reunite Mexican citizens with their Haitian relatives. The program would allow the Haitians a renewable 1 year stay in Mexico, during which time they would be able to study, work and travel.

———————–

El Diario (Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua) 3/11/10

Juarez doesn’t rest

(In the eighth place among the secondary listing of “more news” of the local section)

“Those assassinated yesterday add up to 7”

A more prominent item reported that, as of early afternoon, another four men had become victims of homicide today (Thurs.) And a later report stated that a man was shot and killed outside the Justo Sierra elementary school, just at the time that the children from the morning session were leaving and others were arriving for a later session of classes. “The deceased was identified only as Jose Filiberto, who had a handicap that prevented him from walking.” (photo relates)

————————

Norte (Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua) 3/11/10

Death threat to Juarez mayor

A pig’s head was found on a street in Ciudad Juarez yesterday morning. Beside it, there was also a note addressed to the city’s mayor, Jose Reyes Ferriz. It read: “Jose Reyes Ferriz, you are a pig, you have two weeks of life left ha ha ha.” (The photo in the newspaper accompanying that article shows what appears to be a dead and eviscerated dog, which agrees with other reports about this event.) “Norte” also added that there have been 76 homicides this month in Ciudad Juarez.

————————–

- end or report -

23 posted on March 14, 2010 2:45:46 PM PDT by AuntB (WE are NOT a nation of immigrants! We’re a nation of Americans! http://towncriernews.blogspot.com/)
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22 posted on 03/14/2010 4:09:03 PM PDT by Cindy
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Comment #23 Removed by Moderator

To: hennie pennie

It has never been like this in modern times.


24 posted on 03/14/2010 4:21:48 PM PDT by mylife (Opinions...$1 Halfbaked...50c)
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To: hennie pennie

A bandito is different from a Gang.


25 posted on 03/14/2010 4:22:45 PM PDT by mylife (Opinions...$1 Halfbaked...50c)
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To: Cindy

I don’t expect the Mex. gov. to do anything until there are bloody drug hits in Cancun and Cozumel.


26 posted on 03/14/2010 4:33:59 PM PDT by Rebelbase
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To: MadelineZapeezda

Texas DPS has been advising parents to tell their college age kids to stay out of Mexico this year during spring break.


27 posted on 03/14/2010 4:36:29 PM PDT by comps4spice (Liberalism is a mental illness.)
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Comment #28 Removed by Moderator

To: Cindy

Drugs make the world go round.


29 posted on 03/14/2010 4:45:16 PM PDT by TribalPrincess2U (demonicRATS... taxes, pain and slow death. Is this what you want?)
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To: TribalPrincess2U

Not my world.


30 posted on 03/14/2010 5:02:29 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

It’s coming to the USA:

Mexican drug cartels are infiltrating [USA] federal law enforcement agencies along the Southwest border and those charged with weeding them out say they don’t have the money to catch all the corrupt agents, homeland security officials told a U.S. Senate panel Thursday.
http://azstarnet.com/news/blogs/border-boletin/article_a4776b9e-2e20-11df-b1ae-001cc4c03286.html


31 posted on 03/14/2010 5:04:09 PM PDT by donna (SarahPAC has donated money to...(wait for it)...Lindsey Graham!)
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To: donna

OPINION:

Donna,

The drug cartel-related crime as well as other crime; has bled over the borders now for quite awhile.

Thank you for the link.


32 posted on 03/14/2010 5:07:57 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: comps4spice

Any American kids or adults who go to Mexico and get whacked deserve the Darwin Award. Mexico is very very dangerous toilet.

Send Juan McCain and Graham-nesty down there to visit those areas.


33 posted on 03/14/2010 5:10:49 PM PDT by Frantzie (TV - sending Americans towards Islamic serfdom - Cancel TV service NOW)
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To: MadelineZapeezda

Shoot I am hoping me and my fam are safe we are going to Puerto Vallarta next week.. Geez what a way to worry about Vacation..


34 posted on 03/14/2010 5:29:26 PM PDT by crazydad (What)
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To: Cindy

That’s a shame. Having sworn off all air travel, I was thinking about eventually going to Mexico (via car or bus) but it looks like that’s not gonna happen now.


35 posted on 03/14/2010 5:35:50 PM PDT by OldPossum
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To: mylife

I won’t go to Mexico—never again. Let them feed themselves.


36 posted on 03/14/2010 5:48:18 PM PDT by richardtavor
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To: richardtavor
I won’t go to Mexico—never again. Let them feed themselves.

Same here...I'm sick and tired of Mexicans from the top down blaming the US for all their problems...instead of cleaning up their own crime infested 3rd world hell hole of a country....

37 posted on 03/14/2010 5:50:44 PM PDT by Niteflyr ("Just because something is free doesn't mean it's good for you".)
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To: Cindy

“A number of areas along the border continue to experience a rapid growth in crime. Robberies, homicides, petty thefts, and carjackings have all increased over the last year across Mexico”

We keep being told because of the bad economy here, that many Mexicans have returned to Mexico. Is this what they’re up to now? We can look for crime to increase here as well.


38 posted on 03/14/2010 5:59:43 PM PDT by AuntB (WE are NOT a nation of immigrants! We're a nation of Americans! http://towncriernews.blogspot.com/)
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To: Frantzie

Yeah, but it’s spring break....I’ll be fine.....

/s


39 posted on 03/14/2010 6:10:32 PM PDT by proudtobeanamerican1 (Prayers Up! It's our last defense!)
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To: Cindy

Some our cities are in the same moral condition as Mexico. And things are only getting worse. There are places in the US that I would never even want to visit, because it is way too dangerous. The gangs have taken over. It is clearly the liberal attack on our culture, and the Godless liberal philosophy that has led to all of this.


40 posted on 03/14/2010 7:30:30 PM PDT by Revel
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To: Revel
There are places in the US that I would never even want to visit, because it is way too dangerous. The gangs have taken over.

Yes like Los Angeles...I avoid going there as much as Mexico...actually LA is pretty much like Mexico these days....

41 posted on 03/14/2010 7:33:12 PM PDT by Niteflyr ("Just because something is free doesn't mean it's good for you".)
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To: Revel

I can’t disagree with you.


42 posted on 03/14/2010 7:33:50 PM PDT by Cindy
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To: Cindy

Just the traditional evacuation of families of diplomats from a war zone.


43 posted on 03/15/2010 8:12:58 AM PDT by PAR35
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To: OldPossum

You’d be a lot safer flying to Cancun than you would driving to a border city (on either side).


44 posted on 03/15/2010 8:16:56 AM PDT by PAR35
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To: All

ADDING to post no. 14:

http://articles.latimes.com/2010/mar/15/world/la-fg-mexico-shootings15-2010mar15

MEXICO UNDER SIEGE

“2 Americans and a third victim are killed in Mexico shootings”

SNIPPET: “Two cars leaving a party come under fire in Ciudad Juarez. A baby in the back seat of one car survives unscathed, but her parents are dead.

March 15, 2010|By Tracy Wilkinson and Richard A. Serrano

SNIPPET: “Reporting from Mexico City and Washington — Three people connected to the U.S. Consulate in Mexico’s deadliest city, Ciudad Juarez, were shot to death by men who intercepted their cars as they returned from a child’s birthday party, officials said Sunday. “


45 posted on 03/09/2011 4:38:38 PM PST by Cindy
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To: All

UPDATE:

http://www.fbi.gov/news/stories/2011/march/azteca_030911/azteca_030911

“Violent Border Gang Indicted
Members Charged in Consulate Murders”

03/09/11

SNIPPET: “Thirty-five leaders, members, and associates of one of the most brutal gangs operating along the U.S.-Mexico border have been charged in a federal indictment in Texas with various counts of racketeering, murder, drug offenses, money laundering, and obstruction of justice.

Of the 35 subjects, 10 Mexican nationals were specifically charged with the March 2010 murders in Juarez, Mexico of a U.S. Consulate employee and her husband, along with the husband of another consulate employee.”

###
###

NOTE The following text is a quote:

http://www.fbi.gov/news/pressrel/press-releases/thirty-five-members-and-associates-of-barrio-azteca-gang-charged-with-racketeering-and-other-offenses-including-10-charged-in-u.s.-consulate-murders-in-juarez-mexico

Thirty-Five Members and Associates of Barrio Azteca Gang Charged with Racketeering and Other Offenses, Including 10 Charged in U.S. Consulate Murders in Juarez, Mexico

U.S. Department of Justice
March 09, 2011

WASHINGTON—Thirty-five members and associates of the Barrio Azteca (BA) gang have been charged in a third superseding indictment unsealed today with various counts of racketeering, murder, drug offenses, money laundering, and obstruction of justice, announced Attorney General Eric Holder. Of the 35 defendants, 10 Mexican nationals were charged with the March 13, 2010 murders in Juarez, Mexico of U.S. Consulate employee Leslie Ann Enriquez Catton; her husband, Arthur Redelfs; and Jorge Alberto Salcido Ceniceros, the husband of a U.S. Consulate employee.

Attorney General Holder was joined in announcing the charges by Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney John E. Murphy for the Western District of Texas, FBI Executive Assistant Director Shawn Henry, and Administrator Michele Leonhart of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Today, teams of U.S. federal, state, and local authorities arrested in Texas and New Mexico 12 of the charged defendants not already in custody. Seven of the 10 defendants charged with the March 13, 2010 murders and two other indicted defendants are in custody in Mexico. U.S. authorities are working with Mexican authorities regarding extradition and other matters related to this ongoing prosecution.

“The indictment unsealed today represents our continued action to ensure safety along our Southwest border, to seek justice for victims of violent crime in this region, and to weaken dangerous criminal organizations currently operating in Mexico and the United States,” said Attorney General Holder. “These arrests and criminal charges will disrupt Barrio Azteca’s current operations, and they reaffirm that we will not tolerate acts of violence against those who serve and protect American citizens. We will continue to stand with our partners in Mexico, and together, build on our unprecedented joint efforts to combat violence and protect the safety of the American and the Mexican people.”

“The indictment unsealed today offers a chilling picture of a highly organized, and extremely brutal gang,” said Assistant Attorney General Breuer. “The victims—like so many other victims of the Mexican drug wars—were senselessly caught in the crosshairs of a violent criminal enterprise. This is, at times, a gruesome battle. But let there be no mistake: we will devote our might to bringing Barrio Azteca and other gangs to justice for their acts of violence and intimidation along our border.”

“The vicious murders of Leslie Enriquez; her husband, Arthur Redelfs; and Jorge Salcido illustrate how senseless the violence perpetrated by the drug cartels and their affiliated criminal gangs has become,” said U.S. Attorney Murphy. “Our hearts go out to the families of these three innocent victims, as well as thousands of others, who have suffered tragic losses for which there can be no reparation. The indictment reflects our resolve to vigorously pursue those responsible for these wanton acts and hold them accountable under the rule of law.”

“Trans-border violence is a serious threat that we are using the power of partnerships to combat and prevent,” said FBI Executive Assistant Director Henry. “Along with our other federal, state, and local law enforcement counterparts, we are especially grateful to our Mexican partner agencies for the critical support they provided to help resolve this case and bring the subjects to justice. We may stand on opposite sides of the border, but we stand together on the same side of the law.”

“Barrio Azteca gang members are cold-blooded criminals who show no respect for the law or justice, murdering innocent victims, trafficking drugs, and inciting violence,” said DEA Administrator Leonhart. “But, along with our FBI partners and the support of the government of Mexico, we have shown that the rule of law will prevail, and working together, we will bring these individuals to justice to answer for their ruthless criminal activities.”

The indictment alleges that the defendants are members or associates of the BA, which began in the late 1980s as a violent prison gang and has expanded into a transnational criminal organization. The BA is primarily based in West Texas; Juarez, Mexico; and throughout state and federal prisons in the United States and Mexico. The gang has a militaristic command structure and includes captains, lieutenants, sergeants, and soldiers—all with the purpose of maintaining power and enriching its members and associates through drug trafficking, money laundering, extortion, intimidation, violence, threats of violence, and murder.

The indictment alleges that to increase its power and influence, the BA formed an alliance with the Vicente Carrillo-Fuentes (VCF) drug trafficking organization in Mexico. As part of this alliance, the BA allegedly conducts enforcement operations against VCF rivals and the VCF provides illegal drugs to the BA at discounted prices.

The indictment alleges a host of criminal activity committed by members and associates of the BA since Jan. 1, 2003, including drug trafficking, extortion, money laundering, kidnapping, and murder, including the March 13, 2010, consulate murders in Juarez.

Specifically, the indictment alleges that on March 13, 2010, Ricardo Valles de la Rosa called an individual in the Western District of Texas and received verification of the description of an intended target for murder. The indictment alleges that 10 named BA members, among others, participated in the murders of Enriquez, Redelfs, and Salcido in Juarez.

Jose Antonio Acosta Hernandez, aka “Diego”; Eduardo Ravelo, aka “Tablas”; Luis Mendez, aka “Alex”; Arturo Gallegos Castrellon, aka “Benny”; Ricardo Valles de la Rosa, aka “Chino”; Jose Guadalupe Diaz Diaz, aka “Zorro”; Martin Perez Marrufo, aka “Popeye”; Luis Humberto Hernandez Celis, aka “Pac”; Miguel Angel Nevarez, aka “Lentes”; and Enrique Guajardo Lopez, aka “Kiki” are charged in the indictment with conspiracy to kill persons in a foreign country, murder resulting from the use and carrying of a firearm, and murder in aid of racketeering for their alleged participation in the murder of Enriquez, Redelfs, and Salcido.

Hernandez, Ravelo, and Mendez are currently at large. The United States has filed provisional arrest warrants with the government of Mexico for the arrest of these men in connection with this case. Ravelo is currently one of the FBI’s Top Ten Most Wanted fugitives, and the FBI is offering a reward of up to $100,000 for information leading directly to his arrest.

In addition to the consulate murders, the indictment alleges that in December 2006, a BA member shot and killed Jose Luis Oviedo in El Paso. In 2007, BA members allegedly kidnapped a man in El Paso and took him across the U.S./Mexico border to Juarez. In March 2008, the BA allegedly ordered the murder of BA member David Merez, who was killed that same month in Juarez. The indictment also alleges that the BA caused two persons to be shot and killed in Socorro, Texas, on July 2, 2009. In August 2010, the indictment alleges that BA members kidnapped the wife and parents of a BA member whom they believed was cooperating with U.S. law enforcement and also killed the BA member’s stepdaughter.

According to the indictment, the BA profits by importing heroin, cocaine, and marijuana into the United States from Mexico. The indictment points to specific acts in which more than eight kilos of heroin, more than 100 kilograms of cocaine, and nearly 300 pounds of marijuana are associated with the possession, distribution, or importation of controlled substances into the United States.

BA members and associates also allegedly charge a “street tax,” or “cuota,” on businesses and criminals operating in their turf. These profits are used to support BA members in prison by funneling money into prison commissary accounts of gang leaders and to pay for defense lawyers or fines. The “cuota” profits are also allegedly reinvested into the organization to purchase drugs, guns and ammunition.

If convicted, the defendants face a variety of maximum penalties per charge, including up to life in prison.

An indictment is merely an accusation. All defendants are presumed innocent until proven guilty at trial beyond a reasonable doubt.

The case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorneys Joseph A. Cooley of the Criminal Division’s Gang Unit, Trial Attorney Brian Skaret of the Criminal Division’s Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section, and prosecutors from the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Western District of Texas. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of New Mexico provided significant assistance in this case, including Assistant U.S. Attorney Sarah Davenport. Valuable assistance was provided by the Criminal Division’s Offices of International Affairs and Enforcement Operations. U.S. and Mexican law enforcement authorities, including the Mexican Attorney General’s Office (Procuradura General de la República or PGR) and the Mexican Federal Police (Secretaría de Seguridad Pública or SSP) have cooperated and provided assistance to one another in this ongoing matter.

The case was investigated by the FBI and the DEA. Special assistance was provided by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; Immigration and Customs Enforcement; the U.S. Marshals Service; U.S. Customs and Border Protection; the Federal Bureau of Prisons; U.S. Diplomatic Security Service; the Texas Department of Public Safety; the Texas Department of Criminal Justice; El Paso Police Department; El Paso County Sheriff’s Office; El Paso Independent School District Police Department; Texas Alcohol and Beverage Commission; the West Texas High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area; U.S. Probation Service; New Mexico State Police; Dona Ana County, N.M., Sheriff’s Office; Las Cruces, N.M., Police Department; Southern New Mexico Correctional Facility and Otero County, N.M., Prison Facility.


46 posted on 03/09/2011 4:43:17 PM PST by Cindy
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To: All

ON THE INTERNET:

http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/juarez/index
http://www.freerepublic.com/tag/ciudadjuarez/index


47 posted on 03/09/2011 4:48:50 PM PST by Cindy
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To: All

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/dec/26/mexico-extradites-suspect-in-us-consulate-slaying/

“Mexico extradites suspect in US consulate slaying”

By The Associated Press
2:26 p.m., Dec. 26, 2011
MEXICO CITY —

SNIPPET: “Suspect Joel Abraham Caudillo faces charges of racketeering, drug trafficking, money laundering, and obstruction of justice.

Caudillo is alleged a member of the Barrio Azteca gang, which allegedly killed consular employee Leslie Ann Enriquez Catton and her husband in the border city of Ciudad Juarez.”

SNIPPET: “A U.S. grand jury indicted a total of 35 gang members in the crime, almost all of whom have been arrested.”


48 posted on 12/26/2011 6:09:31 PM PST by Cindy
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To: All

http://www.signonsandiego.com/news/2011/dec/26/mexico-extradites-suspect-in-us-consulate-slaying/

“Mexico extradites suspect in US consulate slaying”

By The Associated Press
2:26 p.m., Dec. 26, 2011
MEXICO CITY —

SNIPPET: “Suspect Joel Abraham Caudillo faces charges of racketeering, drug trafficking, money laundering, and obstruction of justice.

Caudillo is alleged a member of the Barrio Azteca gang, which allegedly killed consular employee Leslie Ann Enriquez Catton and her husband in the border city of Ciudad Juarez.”

SNIPPET: “A U.S. grand jury indicted a total of 35 gang members in the crime, almost all of whom have been arrested.”


49 posted on 12/26/2011 6:09:31 PM PST by Cindy
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To: All

NOTE The following text is a quote:

www.fbi.gov/elpaso/press-releases/2012/juarez-drug-cartel-leader-pleads-guilty-to-charges-related-to-u.s.-consulate-murders-and-is-sentenced-to-life-in-prison

Juarez Drug Cartel Leader Pleads Guilty to Charges Related to U.S. Consulate Murders and is Sentenced to Life in Prison

Defendant Admits to Directing or Participating in More Than 1,500 Murders Since 2008

U.S. Department of Justice
April 05, 2012

Office of Public Affairs

WASHINGTON—The Juarez Drug Cartel’s leader in Juarez and Chihuahua, Mexico pleaded guilty today in El Paso, Texas and was sentenced to life in prison for his participation in drug trafficking and numerous acts of violence in connection with the Barrio Azteca gang, announced Assistant Attorney General Lanny A. Breuer of the Justice Department’s Criminal Division, U.S. Attorney Robert Pitman for the Western District of Texas, FBI Special Agent in Charge Mark Morgan of the FBI’s El Paso Office, and Administrator Michele M. Leonhart of the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

Jose Antonio Acosta-Hernandez, 34, aka “Diego,” “Dienton,” “Diez,” and “Bablazo,” of Chihuahua, was extradited to the United States from Mexico on March 16, 2012. Today, he pleaded guilty to four counts of racketeering, narcotics trafficking, and money laundering. Acosta-Hernandez also pleaded guilty to seven counts of murder and weapons charges, which specifically related to the March 13, 2010 triple homicide in Juarez of U.S. Consulate employee Leslie Enriquez, her husband Arthur Redelfs, and Jorge Salcido Ceniceros, the husband of another U.S. Consulate employee. Immediately after the guilty plea hearing, Acosta-Hernandez was sentenced to seven concurrent life terms, three additional consecutive life terms, and 20 years in federal prison by U.S. District Judge Kathleen Cardone of the Western District of Texas, El Paso Division.

Today’s action is the result of close coordination between U.S. law enforcement and the government of Mexico in the investigation and prosecution of this case. The cooperation and assistance of the government of Mexico was essential to achieving the successful extradition, plea, and sentencing of Acosta-Hernandez.

“As the leader of La Linea’s enforcement wing, Mr. Acosta-Hernandez directed a reign of terror,” said Assistant Attorney General Breuer. “Today’s guilty plea and sentence are a significant step in our effort to bring to justice those responsible for the consulate murders, and it would not have been possible without the extraordinary assistance of our law enforcement partners in Mexico, including Attorney General Marisela Morales Ibáñez. We are determined to hold accountable those individuals who committed the consulate murders and to dismantle the dangerous criminal enterprise that fueled these and many other tragic and senseless acts of violence. Gangs and other criminal organizations that threaten public safety on both sides of the border are on notice that we are working more closely than ever with our Mexican counterparts to shut them down.”

“This plea represents the culmination of a virtual textbook example of cooperation among law enforcement agencies, both in the United States and in Mexico, to hold accountable those at the highest level of the drug trafficking trade,” said U.S. Attorney Pitman. “We will continue to work together with our counterparts in Mexico to target those responsible for the heinous crimes associated with cartel activity.”

“This investigation exemplifies the FBI’s commitment and that of our federal, state, local, and international partners to investigate and prosecute individuals and organized criminal organizations who commit violent acts and other crimes impacting the U.S. and our border area with the Republic of Mexico,” said Special Agent in Charge Morgan. “The joint effort included the participation of USM Service, CBP, DEA, HSI, DOS, Texas DPS, El Paso Police, El Paso County Sheriff’s Office, and our Mexican partners.”

“Acosta-Hernandez is a cold-blooded murderer with no respect for human life or the rule of law,” said DEA Administrator Leonhart. “His violent and deadly actions were put to a stop due to the combined efforts of U.S. law enforcement and the will of the Mexican government. Together, we will relentlessly continue our pressure on the Mexican cartels and gangs that carry out violence on both sides of the border.”

The third superseding indictment, returned on March 2, 2011, alleged that Acosta-Hernandez was an associate of the Barrio Azteca (BA), a violent street and prison gang that began in the late 1980s and expanded into a transnational criminal organization. According to information presented in court, the BA formed an alliance with “La Linea,” which is part of the Juarez Drug Cartel and is also known as the Vincente Carrillo Fuentes Drug Cartel or “VCF.” The purpose of the BA-La Linea alliance was to battle the Chapo Guzman Cartel and its allies for control of the drug trafficking routes through Juarez and Chihuahua. The drug routes through Juarez, known as the Juarez Plaza, are important to drug trafficking organizations because they are a principal illicit drug trafficking conduit into the United States.

Acosta-Hernandez admitted that in approximately 2008, he became the leader of La Linea’s armed enforcement wing and acted as the VCF’s plaza boss in Chihuahua and Juarez. In this role, Acosta-Hernandez, in coordination with the BA, led violent attacks against their common enemies. Acosta-Hernandez admitted that he directed or participated in more than 1,500 murders since 2008.

For example, Acosta-Hernandez admitted that on January 30, 2010, he ordered hitmen in his organization to kill members of the opposition that were sighted at a daytime birthday party at a home in Juarez. As part of this incident, 16 individuals were killed and 10 individuals were wounded at three different residences in Juarez. On July 15, 2010, Acosta-Hernandez directed a car bombing in Juarez that ultimately killed four people.

Acosta-Hernandez admitted that his purpose for engaging in these violent attacks was, in part, to protect and enhance the La Linea-BA alliance’s importation of heroin, cocaine, and marijuana into the Western District of Texas and elsewhere and ultimately to make possible the distribution of those drugs in the United States. Acosta-Hernandez admitted that he knew that the La Linea-BA alliance earned millions of dollars in drug trafficking profits each year. He also knew that these profits were reinvested into the organization to purchase additional drugs to import into the United States and/or to purchase weapons, ammunition, or supplies to continue fighting enemies of La Linea and the BA.

During the guilty plea hearing, Acosta-Hernandez also pleaded guilty to charges relating to the triple homicide of Enriquez, Redelfs, and Salcido, based on his leadership position within La Linea and association with the BA. According to information presented in court, on March 13, 2010, Enriquez, her husband Redelfs, and Salcido, a Mexican national and husband of a second U.S. Consulate employee, were shot and killed by other BA members in Juarez in separate but related incidents. According to information presented in court, on March 13, employees of the U.S. Consulate hosted a child’s birthday party in Juarez. Salcido was shot and killed in his vehicle as he left the party. His three children also were in the car and sustained minor injuries. His wife, a Mexican national employee at the U.S. Consulate, was following Salcido in a separate vehicle and was unharmed in the attack.

At approximately the same time, U.S. citizens Enriquez and Redelfs left the same party and were shot and killed in their vehicle. Enriquez was four months pregnant at the time of the shooting. Enriquez’s and Redelfs’ 9-month-old daughter also was in the vehicle but was unharmed.

During the hearing, Acosta-Hernandez acknowledged that Salcido, Enriquez, and Redelfs were murdered by members and associates of the BA to further the gang’s racketeering activities. Acosta-Hernandez admitted that at the time, under his leadership as VCF’s plaza boss and coordinator of enforcement actions with the BA in Juarez, La Linea and the BA had agreed to unite and commit murders to further their criminal enterprise.

A total of 35 defendants were charged in the third superseding indictment and are alleged to have committed various criminal acts, including racketeering, narcotics distribution, and importation; retaliation against persons providing information to U.S. law enforcement; extortion; money laundering; obstruction of justice; and murder, including the 2010 Juarez consulate murders. Of the 35 defendants charged, 32 have been apprehended; 23 of those defendants have pleaded guilty, while seven others are pending extradition from Mexico. U.S. and Mexican law enforcement are actively seeking to apprehend the three remaining fugitives in this case, including Eduardo Ravelo, an FBI Top Ten Most Wanted Fugitive. Trial against Ramon Renteria, aka “Spooky,” is scheduled to begin in El Paso on May 18, 2012.

The case is being prosecuted by Trial Attorney Joseph A. Cooley of the Criminal Division’s Organized Crime and Gang Section, Trial Attorney Brian Skaret of the Criminal Division’s Human Rights and Special Prosecutions Section, and Assistant U.S. Attorney George Leal of the Western District of Texas-El Paso Division. The U.S. Attorney’s Office for the District of New Mexico provided significant assistance in this case, including by Assistant U.S. Attorney Sarah Davenport. Valuable assistance was provided by the Criminal Division’s Offices of International Affairs and Enforcement Operations.

The case was investigated by the FBI’s El Paso Field Office, FBI’s Albuquerque Field Office (Las Cruces Resident Agency), DEA Juarez, and DEA El Paso. Special assistance was provided by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearm,s and Explosives; Immigration and Customs Enforcement; the U.S. Marshals Service; U.S. Customs and Border Protection; Federal Bureau of Prisons; U.S. Diplomatic Security Service; the Texas Department of Public Safety; the Texas Department of Criminal Justice; El Paso Police Department; El Paso County Sheriff’s Office; El Paso Independent School District Police Department; Texas Alcohol and Beverage Commission; New Mexico State Police; Dona Ana County, New Mexico Sheriff’s Office; Las Cruces, New Mexico Police Department; Southern New Mexico Correctional Facility; and Otero County Prison Facility New Mexico.


50 posted on 04/12/2012 2:22:14 AM PDT by Cindy
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