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S. Korea: Naval patrol boat capsizes after sinking
Yonhap News ^ | 03/27/10

Posted on 03/27/2010 8:54:02 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster

Naval patrol boat capsizes after sinking

[ 2010-03-27 10:32 ]

March 27, INCHEON, South Korea -- A South Korean Coast Guard ship (R) approaches the Navy's patrol ship Cheonan, which capsized after sinking on March 26, during a rescue operation in the Yellow Sea, west of Seoul, on March 27. Only part of the sunken ship's bottom remained above water. (Yonhap)

(END) / 데스크1


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: asia; frigate; navy; sinking; skorea; southkorea

1 posted on 03/27/2010 8:54:02 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster
From another related article:

http://app.yonhapnews.co.kr/YNA/Basic/Article/Print/YIBW_showEnArticlePrintView.aspx?contents_id=AEN20100327004300315

(7th LD) S. Korea continues rescue operations on sunken ship

(ATTN: UPDATES with comments by ship captain in paras 10-14, salvage boat heading to the scene)

By Shin Hae-in

SEOUL, March 27 (Yonhap) — Military rescuers will continue their search through the night for dozens of sailors who went missing when their warship sank after a mysterious explosion in its hull, officials said Saturday.

A 1,200-ton South Korean Navy corvette with 104 sailors on board went down late Friday evening near the Yellow Sea border with North Korea, the scene of three bloody skirmishes between the navies of the two countries in November last year, 1999 and 2002.

Military officials said a total of 58 sailors have so far been rescued, with 46 others still unaccounted for and rescue operations delayed due to bad weather. A salvage vessel was due to arrive at the scene Sunday afternoon to expedite rescue efforts.

North Korea's possible involvement was initially suspected, but Seoul government officials said it was premature to draw any conclusions.

“It is hard to say for sure now, but chances appear to be slim that North Korea was related,” a senior official said, speaking on the condition of anonymity. “If North Korea's attack really caused the sinking, it means there is a serious loophole in our defense system.”
Navy divers had planned to go underwater to search the sunken craft Cheonan which officials said is protruding from the shallow waters about 24 meters deep, but the effort was hampered by inclement weather.

Defense Minister Kim Tae-young said after visiting the disaster site that the government is “yet to track down the exact cause behind the tragedy.”

“The investigation hasn't been easy due to strong currents. I could see the difficulties there. We have 40 minutes or so for the divers to stay in the waters each day,” Kim told reporters.

“Making predictions is meaningless in this situation, I believe. We are making the utmost effort to find anyone. Please bear with us.”

Choi Won-il, captain of the sunken vessel, said his ship tilted to the right soon after he heard a loud bang as he was looking over an operation plan in his cabin.
“All power and communication means were lost,” he said. “When I came out of the cabin, the rear of the vessel was already missing,” he told a group of families of the missing sailors.

The defense minister said images of Cheonan, as taken by special equipment called thermal observation device (TOD), indicate that the ship was split in half before sinking.

The National Assembly's defense committee was briefed that the captain had communicated with Pyeongtaek-based 2nd Navy Fleet, to which Cheonan belonged, saying that his ship was sinking.

The captain also reported that the blast, the loss of power, and the ship's split all occurred in less than two minutes, according to lawmakers who received the briefing.

The sunken vessel, known to be 88 meters long and 10 meters wide, was put into service in 1989, according to Navy officials.

President Lee Myung-bak re-convened a security meeting later Saturday after several hours of break to assess the latest developments. All South Korean government officials were put on standby.

President Lee ordered a “quick and thorough” investigation with “all possibilities” in mind, the presidential office Cheong Wa Dae spokeswoman Kim Eun-hye told reporters.

“The military should make all-out efforts to rescue as many survivors as possible,” the spokesman quoted the president as saying as he presided over the security meeting.

The Navy vessel, armed with missiles and torpedoes, went down well inside South Korean waters, about 1.8 kilometers from South Korea's northernmost island of Baengnyeong, a fact that may preclude North Korean involvement.

Quoting reports from the crew of the sunken ship, defense officials said an unidentified explosion punched a hole near the screw, forcing the craft to take on water.

On Saturday, multiple officials told Yonhap News Agency that chances of North Korea's involvement appear slim. They cited the relatively long distance between the maritime border and the scene of the incident.

The incident took place at a sensitive time when South Korea, along with the U.S. and three other regional players, are stepping up efforts to lure North Korea back to six-party nuclear disarmament talks that have been stalled since late 2008. The other countries involved are China, Japan and Russia.

President Lee instructed his government to update the other members of the six-way talks on the situation
North Korea has remained silent on the incident, with its military showing no unusual moves, according to South Korean defense officials.

Cross-border traffic between the two Koreas remains normal, with seven South Korean company officials visiting a mountain resort in the communist nation as scheduled, according to the Unification Ministry.

“We are detecting no unusual movement from North Korea,” Joint Chiefs of Staff spokesman Park said. Another JCS officer, Lee Ki-shik, said the military is “very cautious about pointing fingers at North Korea or any other causes at the moment.”

In Washington, the State Department said it has no evidence of North Korea's involvement.

“Let's not jump to conclusions here,” State Department spokesman Philip Crowley said Friday, responding to a question about any North Korean involvement. “I'm not aware of any evidence to that effect. But I think the authoritative source here would be the South Korean government.”

Military officials were narrowing down the possibilities to the vessel's collision with a rock, a torpedo attack from outside forces, including North Korea, or an internal explosion due to the gunpowder and explosives the ship was carrying.

The Navy plans to salvage the sunken vessel for investigation to determine what caused the incident, a long process that may take at least 20 days, officials said. The ship, first deployed in 1989, was equipped with missiles and torpedoes, according to officials.

The incident comes amid heightened tension between the two Koreas, which technically remain in a state of conflict since the 1950-1953 Korean War ended in a truce, not a peace treaty. North Korea has said in recent weeks it is bolstering its defense in response to joint South Korean-U.S. military drills that were held this month.

North Korea does not recognize the western sea border, drawn by the United Nations at the end of the Korean War, and claims that it should be redrawn further south.

2 posted on 03/27/2010 8:56:25 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Capsizes after sinking? Now that would be a first.


3 posted on 03/27/2010 8:57:41 AM PDT by buccaneer81 (ECOMCON)
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To: TigerLikesRooster
Doesn't sinking imply that the darn thing "goes under"?

Capsizing, OTOH, could just mean "turn over"...
What am I missing here?

4 posted on 03/27/2010 8:58:10 AM PDT by China Clipper (My favorite animals usually are found next to the rice on my plate.)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

The sea around the location of sinking is shallow, some 20~30 meter(approx 67~100 feet) deep. That is why the part of ship could stick out to the surface.


5 posted on 03/27/2010 9:00:00 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: China Clipper

It sank into the shallow sea(70~100 feet deep.) The ship is 88 meter(some 300 feet) long. That is why part of the ship can stick out to the surface.
The ship rolled around while sinking. It finally went down with its bottom up.


6 posted on 03/27/2010 9:03:30 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Has anyone seen a closeup of the hole>

Inward bent metal would indicate an external explosion, such as a torpedo or mine. Outward bent metal would indicate an internal, probably accidential, explosion.


7 posted on 03/27/2010 9:14:23 AM PDT by MindBender26 (Prezdet Obama is what you get when you let the O.J. jury select a president !)
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To: China Clipper

Who writes this crap


8 posted on 03/27/2010 9:14:26 AM PDT by al baby (Hi Mom sarc ;))
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Has anyone seen a closeup of the hole? (oops>

Inward bent metal would indicate an external explosion, such as a torpedo or mine. Outward bent metal would indicate an internal, probably accidential, explosion.


9 posted on 03/27/2010 9:14:50 AM PDT by MindBender26 (Prezdet Obama is what you get when you let the O.J. jury select a president !)
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To: MindBender26

Yes, many here are dying to find that out, too. I suspect they may know by now, but no announcement. The ship is said to be completely broken in half while sinking. Probably many pieces are down there, creating navigation hazard for navy divers.


10 posted on 03/27/2010 9:19:39 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: MindBender26

Bush did it.


11 posted on 03/27/2010 9:20:05 AM PDT by bunkerhill7
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To: TigerLikesRooster
The 1,200-ton patrol ship Cheonan was on routine patrol when it sank Friday at 9:45 p.m. A cause has yet to be determined but the Yonhap News Agency quoted military officials as saying that an unidentified explosion punched a hole in the bottom of the ship.
12 posted on 03/27/2010 9:22:19 AM PDT by McGruff (Don't criticize. Explain to me who I should support other than Sarah Palin.)
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To: buccaneer81

I was going to say.


13 posted on 03/27/2010 9:22:24 AM PDT by Scotsman will be Free (11C - Indirect fire, infantry - High angle hell - We will bring you, FIRE)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Eternal Father...


14 posted on 03/27/2010 9:31:47 AM PDT by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: TigerLikesRooster

Would the South appease and cover up the incident?


15 posted on 03/27/2010 9:39:03 AM PDT by FreeAtlanta (Hey Barack Hubris Obama, $10 is all it would take, why spend millions to cover it up?)
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To: McGruff
The story sounds a bit different today. It will be interesting to see what the divers observe. I don't recall hearing the ship split in half yesterday, or that it rolled over. It sure would be embarrassing if the ship blew up from some sailor smoking around the ships explosives.
16 posted on 03/27/2010 9:40:43 AM PDT by stumptalker
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To: buccaneer81

The defense minister said images of Cheonan, as taken by special equipment called thermal observation device (TOD), indicate that the ship was split in half before sinking.

Torpedo. Has to be one Hell of an explosion to bust a keel in half. Not likely an internal explosion.

Sounds like this is going to be a TWA 800 investigation.


17 posted on 03/27/2010 9:50:55 AM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: stumptalker
I agree the waters are still murky concerning this incident. Here's another version of what happened.

Rear Adm. Lee Ki-sik of the Joint Chiefs of Staff told lawmakers "The explosion at the rear of the Cheonan shut down its engine, wiped out power and caused the ship to sink a little over three hours later...

18 posted on 03/27/2010 9:51:17 AM PDT by McGruff (Don't criticize. Explain to me who I should support other than Sarah Palin.)
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To: buccaneer81

Should make the investigation easier. Im betting on a mine, and open to a *very* remote possibility of an internal explosion. But with the hole right there, a definitive provable answer should be coming.


19 posted on 03/27/2010 10:00:16 AM PDT by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office)
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To: McGruff
As a 28 year Navy guy.. I offer this..
1.It is VERY rare that naval ordnance just explodes all by itself.
2. When Naval Ordnance does explode or have a mishap, it is usually being handled,loaded or fired.
3. To the extent of reports that the ship "Broke In Half", "The stern was missing" indicates to me that external hydro-graphic forces were involved.
4. Naval mines and torpedoes are designed to explode underneath a vessel, causing the hydro-graphic forces to create a Bubble under the ship.
That bubble first causes the ship to "bend" because the middle of the ship is no longer supported by the water itself.
Then as the bubble collapses, in rushing water along with the explosive effects , lift the middle of the ship up.
This Bending motion then breaks the keel and the ship sinks.
IMHO this is a acoustic mine or torpedo as evidenced by the event occurring around the screws (props)

"No Higher Honor" is a book detailing the extraordinary tale of the USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58) which was hit by a mine in the Persian Gulf back in 1988

20 posted on 03/27/2010 10:05:19 AM PDT by Robe (Rome did not create a great empire by talking, they did it by killing all those who opposed them)
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To: Walkingfeather
Torpedo. Has to be one Hell of an explosion to bust a keel in half. Not likely an internal explosion.

Not a navy guy, right?

21 posted on 03/27/2010 10:06:18 AM PDT by ColdWater ("The theory of evolution really has no bearing on what I'm trying to accomplish with FR anyway. ")
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To: TigerLikesRooster
The explosion blew out the bottom of the keel at the stern, causing the ship to lose its entire stern. The location of the explosion is where the anti-submarine depth charges and mines are stored onboard.

They were about 4 miles from the Line of Demarcation in an area that S Korea, not N Korea has mined with anti-ship, sea floor anchored magnetic mines. My theory is that one of S Korea's own mines may have accidently released, surfaced, found the ship and exploded.

Torpedo, nope, too dark, no N Korea naval ships on radar for many miles, damage too extreme.

The other possibility is mishandling of onboard ordnance.

The ship and detached stern will be floated and dry-docked. N Korean involvement is discounted.

22 posted on 03/27/2010 10:08:31 AM PDT by gandalftb (OK State: Go Cowboys)
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To: al baby

Yonhap News


23 posted on 03/27/2010 10:09:08 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: ColdWater

No, but I play one on tv....


24 posted on 03/27/2010 10:11:14 AM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: gandalftb

Sounds like a good theory!


25 posted on 03/27/2010 10:12:48 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Walkingfeather
Most warships TIKO do not store explosives in the engine room.

Have they ruled out a mine, bottom or limpet?

FFG-58 hit one in 1988, the hull metal was pretty twisted - but fairly obvious that the explosion was outside the hull.

And further, you cannot rule out sabotage until all reports are in....

26 posted on 03/27/2010 10:20:06 AM PDT by ASOC (In case of attack, tune to 640 kilocycles or 1240 kilocycles on your AM dial.)
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To: Walkingfeather

http://www.history.navy.mil/docs/wwii/pearl/ph117.htm


27 posted on 03/27/2010 10:23:10 AM PDT by ColdWater ("The theory of evolution really has no bearing on what I'm trying to accomplish with FR anyway. ")
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To: Walkingfeather

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Hood_(51)


28 posted on 03/27/2010 10:25:18 AM PDT by ColdWater ("The theory of evolution really has no bearing on what I'm trying to accomplish with FR anyway. ")
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To: Walkingfeather

http://www.kbismarck.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=1571&start=30


29 posted on 03/27/2010 10:28:10 AM PDT by ColdWater ("The theory of evolution really has no bearing on what I'm trying to accomplish with FR anyway. ")
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To: Robe
As a former torpedoman I agree with your assessment. If you look at the FOURTH SET of photos down, (SECOND POST) on the following web page:

http://www.kbismarck.org/forum/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=1571

(colored photos in series) you will see a pictoral description of EXACTLY what you described... Stern completely removed from the vessel. IF the SK ship lost her whole stern section it looks like a torpedo or underwater mine attack to me.

30 posted on 03/27/2010 11:42:04 AM PDT by Jmouse007 (Heavenly Father, deliver us from evil and from those perpetuating it, in Jesus name, amen.)
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To: McGruff
Well at least S. Korea has the sense to check it out before escalating the situation.
31 posted on 03/27/2010 12:48:10 PM PDT by stumptalker
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To: ASOC

Well I still am thinking of torpedo. The location of where the explosion occurred and the timing of the rhetoric of NK is too coincidental. My bet is they did it.


32 posted on 03/27/2010 3:07:46 PM PDT by Walkingfeather
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To: Walkingfeather

Snapping a ship’s keel is exactly what modern naval mines & torpedoes are designed to do. The days of contact fuses went out early in WW2.


33 posted on 03/27/2010 6:00:50 PM PDT by Tallguy ("The sh- t's chess, it ain't checkers!" -- Alonzo (Denzel Washington) in "Training Day")
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To: Walkingfeather

The NoROKs still sneek adross the DMZ and plant mines in the SOuth. WHen I was there (76) we lost 5 Army troops to mines. Until an officer gets killed, it doesn’t seem to make the news.

So, did they sneak in a bottom mine? They have them and have used them..... I guess we will have towait until the news gets around to reporting it.

Remember the Maine!...oh, wait


34 posted on 03/28/2010 11:53:20 AM PDT by ASOC (In case of attack, tune to 640 kilocycles or 1240 kilocycles on your AM dial.)
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