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Radioactive fish near Vt. nuke plant deemed common
AP ^ | May 31, 2010 | DAVE GRAM

Posted on 05/30/2010 4:39:50 PM PDT by DogByte6RER

Radioactive fish near Vt. nuke plant deemed common

Photobucket

MONTPELIER, Vt. — When a fish taken from the Connecticut River recently tested positive for radioactive strontium-90, suspicion focused on the nearby Vermont Yankee nuclear plant as the likely source.

Operators of the troubled 38-year-old nuclear plant on the banks of the river, where work is under way to clean up leaking radioactive tritium, revealed this month that it also found soil contaminated with strontium-90, an isotope linked to bone cancer and leukemia.

Three days later, officials said a fish caught four miles upstream from the reactor in February had tested positive for strontium-90 in its bones. State officials say they don't believe the contamination came from Vermont Yankee.

Tritium was reported leaking from the plant in January, and since then has turned up in monitoring wells at levels 100 times the federal Environmental Protection Agency's safety limit for that substance in drinking water. Other radioactive isotopes have been found as well, including cesium-137, zinc-65 and cobalt-60.

Officials have said tritium has been flowing downhill from the plant to the adjacent river, though it is diluted quickly in the fast-flowing stream. Tests on river water have not produced measurable tritium readings. Now the question is whether strontium-90, generally considered a more dangerous isotope than tritium, may also have found its way to the river.

State health officials say Vermont Yankee most likely was not the source of the radioactivity in the fish, a yellow perch. Fish and other living things — including humans — around the world have been absorbing tiny amounts of strontium-90 since the United States, Russia and China tested nuclear weapons in the atmosphere in the 1950s and 1960s. A fresher dose was released by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986.

(Excerpt) Read more at google.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events; US: Vermont
KEYWORDS: atomicfish; bigfish; cryptozoology; fish; gonefishing; nuclearpower; radioactive; vermont; vermontyankee; weird
Hmmm...

I wonder if these fish have that fishy mackeral taste or if they taste something like a swordfish?

1 posted on 05/30/2010 4:39:50 PM PDT by DogByte6RER
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To: DogByte6RER

Dang, I wuz going to point out that the fish are safe to eat unless they have three eyes. Pic’s already there.


2 posted on 05/30/2010 4:41:07 PM PDT by Paladin2
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Photobucket In this May 29, 2010 photo, Charles Parker remove a small fish from his line while fishing in the Connecticut River across from the Vermont Yankee nuclear power plant. When a fish taken from the Connecticut River recently tested positive for radioactive strontium-90, suspicion focused on the nearby Vermont Yankee nuclear plant as the likely source. Operators of the troubled 38-year-old nuclear plant on the banks of the river, where work is under way to clean up leaking radioactive tritium, revealed this month that it also found soil contaminated with strontium-90, an isotope linked to bone cancer and leukemia. (AP Photo/Jason R. Henske)
3 posted on 05/30/2010 4:45:42 PM PDT by DogByte6RER ("Loose lips sink ships")
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To: Paladin2

If it’s a plant,
would it be a ‘red herring’?


4 posted on 05/30/2010 4:47:57 PM PDT by aumrl (let's keep it real Conservatives)
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To: DogByte6RER
Obligatory...


5 posted on 05/30/2010 4:48:18 PM PDT by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: DogByte6RER
Other radioactive isotopes have been found as well, including cesium-137

Cesium 137 = Chernobyl.

6 posted on 05/30/2010 4:51:40 PM PDT by denydenydeny (The welfare state turns us all into zoo animals, mouths open, waiting for the next feeding.)
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To: DogByte6RER

Here comes the moratorium un nuclear power.


7 posted on 05/30/2010 4:59:32 PM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: DogByte6RER

This is what they served to the Mexican President, Calderone!!!!!!!!LOL!


8 posted on 05/30/2010 5:15:23 PM PDT by Doc Savage (SOBAMP!)
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To: DogByte6RER

Bullcrap.

Uranium is mined and is a naturally occurring element. Also, Rock of Ages granite mine can certainly open up fissures for U-238. Nothing like MSM-based emotion-based logic.


9 posted on 05/30/2010 5:20:01 PM PDT by CincyRichieRich (Keep your head up and keep moving forward!)
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To: CincyRichieRich

Strontium 90 has a half-life of about 30 years, so if you can see it, it was made within the last 300 years (it takes about 10 half-lives for an isotope to become very, very hard to detect). if you detect Sr90 it is not natural, it had to have been made by us, somewhen. Same with Cs137, it’s not natural. Most likely source is Chernobyl.

Modern gear can detect a few atoms of a radioactive substance.


10 posted on 05/30/2010 5:29:56 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: DBrow

Strontium 90 has a half-life of about 30 years, so if you can see it, it was made within the last 300 years (it takes about 10 half-lives for an isotope to become very, very hard to detect). if you detect Sr90 it is not natural, it had to have been made by us, somewhen. Same with Cs137, it’s not natural. Most likely source is Chernobyl.

Modern gear can detect a few atoms of a radioactive substance.


You’re right, we should trust the governmental scientists who feed the MSM their conclusions. They don’t have any self-interest or benefit in an intended outcome, and, there’s plenty independent, 3rd parties who give us reports and double-blind proofs, etc. Sarc off. Please let’s all worship the EPA while we’re at it.


11 posted on 05/30/2010 5:36:40 PM PDT by CincyRichieRich (Keep your head up and keep moving forward!)
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To: CincyRichieRich

You are suggesting a different half life for Sr90?


12 posted on 05/30/2010 5:52:09 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: CincyRichieRich

It is true that EPA will lower their “standards” for a chemical if the analytical gear improves and you can “see” lower quantities.

The article says “100 times some limit” for H3, but I did not see where they mentioned Sr levels at all, just that they detected it.


13 posted on 05/30/2010 5:54:20 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: DBrow

No, I’m suggesting don’t believe what you read when it is from MSM.


14 posted on 05/30/2010 5:55:46 PM PDT by CincyRichieRich (Keep your head up and keep moving forward!)
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To: CincyRichieRich

I’m with you!


15 posted on 05/30/2010 5:56:32 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: DBrow

How do you get tritium out of the fission of uranium?


16 posted on 05/30/2010 7:40:50 PM PDT by VanShuyten ("a shadow...draped nobly in the folds of a gorgeous eloquence.")
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To: VanShuyten

From lots of neutrons hitting water. Regular water yields some, heavy water (like the CANDU units) generate more.

It is a very rare fission product coming directly from U fission, but the quantity is negligible.

I think the US used to make it by bombarding lithium in reactors, we don’t any more.


17 posted on 05/30/2010 7:52:10 PM PDT by DBrow
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To: DogByte6RER
A fresher dose was released by the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986.

Good, I like fresh doses in my fish.

18 posted on 05/30/2010 7:52:13 PM PDT by razorback-bert (Some days it's not worth chewing through the straps.)
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To: DBrow
What do you think about the “100x normal” claim? Is it believable that a leak in the cooling jacket would release that much tritium that there would be a 100x level in the wells? Maybe that might come from natural sources. Granite is famous for having trapped radioactives. I would think that any tritium produced in the cooling water would quickly go downstream.
19 posted on 05/30/2010 10:34:57 PM PDT by VanShuyten ("a shadow...draped nobly in the folds of a gorgeous eloquence.")
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To: VanShuyten; DBrow
How do you get tritium out of the fission of uranium?

Apparently, by going fission in the Connecticut River.

20 posted on 05/31/2010 10:16:55 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: DogByte6RER
Which radioactive isotope works best for bait?


21 posted on 05/31/2010 10:18:47 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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To: DogByte6RER
Ah...... the good life.

Catching radioactive fish, while being subjected to huge EM emissions from electrical towers.

Later, a drive home sucking up SUV exhaust and asbestos particles.

Then, finally at home, relaxing in front of the radiation gun aimed at the center of your body, to watch reruns.

But hey, the fish wasn't covered in oil.


22 posted on 05/31/2010 10:32:13 AM PDT by UCANSEE2 (The Last Boy Scout)
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