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Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning ( Must Read )
http://mariovittone.com/2010/05/154/ ^ | Mario

Posted on 07/09/2010 8:16:57 AM PDT by ventanax5

The new captain jumped from the cockpit, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim as he headed straight for the owners who were swimming between their anchored sportfisher and the beach. “I think he thinks you’re drowning,” the husband said to his wife. They had been splashing each other and she had screamed but now they were just standing, neck-deep on the sand bar. “We’re fine, what is he doing?” she asked, a little annoyed. “We’re fine!” the husband yelled, waving him off, but his captain kept swimming hard. ”Move!” he barked as he sprinted between the stunned owners. Directly behind them, not ten feet away, their nine-year-old daughter was drowning. Safely above the surface in the arms of the captain, she burst into tears, “Daddy!”

How did this captain know, from fifty feet away, what the father couldn’t recognize from just ten? Drowning is not the violent, splashing, call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, had learned what drowning looks like by watching television. If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us) then you should make sure that you and your crew knows what to look for whenever people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” she hadn’t made a sound. As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn’t surprised at all by this story. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing, and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for, is rarely seen in real life.

(Excerpt) Read more at mariovittone.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: accidentaldeath; coastguard; drowning; firstaid; health; lifeguard; lifeguards; rescue; swimming
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1 posted on 07/09/2010 8:17:02 AM PDT by ventanax5
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To: ventanax5

I never knew. Thanks.


2 posted on 07/09/2010 8:24:09 AM PDT by pingman (Price is what you pay, value is what you get.)
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To: ventanax5

This is so true. A few years ago at a pool my son (who’s had swimming lessons) got stuck under a life ring and couldn’t get back up to the surface. At first I thought he was just playing under water, but as I watched from the side of the pool, I realized he was struggling. I was about to kick off my shoes and jump in when the lifeguard finally caught my eye with a look of “should I do something?” I yelled, “YES!” and she dove in and saved him. It was terrifying for both him and me.


3 posted on 07/09/2010 8:25:02 AM PDT by reegs
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To: ventanax5
I hope I'm not hijacking the thread, but I've been thinking a lot lately about how TV shows us a false reality. A lot of what people "know" comes from TV and is not at all reflective of reality. I'm not talking about "Palin is stupid" (although that's part of it), but the phenomenon is much broader. Examples:

Drowning people make a lot of noise, and go down three times.
Waitresses in NYC can afford 3000 sq foot rental apartments.
Police officers often kill 14 people and smash 8 cars in an average working day.
Any computer password can be cracked in less than 10 seconds, if you know what you're doing.
etc.

People take TV for reality and then they walk out their front door and don't function very well in the real world.

4 posted on 07/09/2010 8:26:02 AM PDT by ClearCase_guy
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To: ventanax5

A friend of mine drowned a few years back while drinking. The guys he was with swam to shore after the boat overtuned and said he was just gone.

A few months later I talked to the cop who recovered the body and he said that my friend likely slid beneath the water and never came back up or struggled.


5 posted on 07/09/2010 8:26:16 AM PDT by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: ventanax5

Timely post.


6 posted on 07/09/2010 8:27:35 AM PDT by secret garden (Why procrastinate when you can perendinate?)
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To: reegs

Wow. That is scary. I am not afraid of the water but I haven’t been to a water park in about 20 years and will never ever go again. I was in an inner tube and somehow fell through so I was lodged in there. I got bounced under and hit my head very hard on the side of the slide. I could have been knocked unconscious. I hope people watch their children as carefully as you were on that day.


7 posted on 07/09/2010 8:27:56 AM PDT by Paved Paradise
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To: ventanax5

Very frightening description, but true and worth remembering. It’s simply a physical fact that when people are drowning, they can’t call out for help or thrash around; I saw a near-drowning once, and it was like that.


8 posted on 07/09/2010 8:28:22 AM PDT by livius
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To: ClearCase_guy

The depictions of childbirth.

Totally unrealistic.

Done it multiple times, unmedicated, but if it were as awful as shown on TV, I’d remain childless.


9 posted on 07/09/2010 8:29:14 AM PDT by Jedidah
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To: livius

I have never looked at water the same way since I got Life Guard certed 20 years ago. I’m always scannin.


10 posted on 07/09/2010 8:30:47 AM PDT by downwdims (It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority)
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To: ventanax5

•Head low in the water, mouth at water level
•Head tilted back with mouth open
•Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
•Eyes closed
•Hair over forehead or eyes
•Not using legs – Vertical
•Hyperventilating or gasping
•Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
•Trying to roll over on the back
•Ladder climb, rarely out of the water.

Sounds like our economy.


11 posted on 07/09/2010 8:30:54 AM PDT by frithguild (I gave to Joe Wilson the day after, to Scott Brown seven days before and next to JD Hayworth.)
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To: ventanax5

Another example of good content, unreadable blog.

Here, just post it. No need to excerpt, and much more readable here. Kind of imporant information, too.

**************************

Drowning Doesn’t Look Like Drowning

by Mario on May 18, 2010

in Boating Safety,Coast Guard,gCaptain

Artículo en Español

The new captain jumped from the cockpit, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard, he kept his eyes on his victim as he headed straight for the owners who were swimming between their anchored sportfisher and the beach. “I think he thinks you’re drowning,” the husband said to his wife. They had been splashing each other and she had screamed but now they were just standing, neck-deep on the sand bar. “We’re fine, what is he doing?” she asked, a little annoyed. “We’re fine!” the husband yelled, waving him off, but his captain kept swimming hard. ”Move!” he barked as he sprinted between the stunned owners. Directly behind them, not ten feet away, their nine-year-old daughter was drowning. Safely above the surface in the arms of the captain, she burst into tears, “Daddy!”

How did this captain know, from fifty feet away, what the father couldn’t recognize from just ten? Drowning is not the violent, splashing, call for help that most people expect. The captain was trained to recognize drowning by experts and years of experience. The father, on the other hand, had learned what drowning looks like by watching television. If you spend time on or near the water (hint: that’s all of us) then you should make sure that you and your crew knows what to look for whenever people enter the water. Until she cried a tearful, “Daddy,” she hadn’t made a sound. As a former Coast Guard rescue swimmer, I wasn’t surprised at all by this story. Drowning is almost always a deceptively quiet event. The waving, splashing, and yelling that dramatic conditioning (television) prepares us to look for, is rarely seen in real life.

The Instinctive Drowning Response – so named by Francesco A. Pia, Ph.D., is what people do to avoid actual or perceived suffocation in the water. And it does not look like most people expect. There is very little splashing, no waving, and no yelling or calls for help of any kind. To get an idea of just how quiet and undramatic from the surface drowning can be, consider this: It is the number two cause of accidental death in children, age 15 and under (just behind vehicle accidents) – of the approximately 750 children who will drown next year, about 375 of them will do so within 25 yards of a parent or other adult. In ten percent of those drownings, the adult will actually watch them do it, having no idea it is happening (source: CDC). Drowning does not look like drowning – Dr. Pia, in an article in the Coast Guard’s On Scene Magazine, described the instinctive drowning response like this:

1.Except in rare circumstances, drowning people are physiologically unable to call out for help. The respiratory system was designed for breathing. Speech is the secondary or overlaid function. Breathing must be fulfilled, before speech occurs.
2.Drowning people’s mouths alternately sink below and reappear above the surface of the water. The mouths of drowning people are not above the surface of the water long enough for them to exhale, inhale, and call out for help. When the drowning people’s mouths are above the surface, they exhale and inhale quickly as their mouths start to sink below the surface of the water.
3.Drowning people cannot wave for help. Nature instinctively forces them to extend their arms laterally and press down on the water’s surface. Pressing down on the surface of the water, permits drowning people to leverage their bodies so they can lift their mouths out of the water to breathe.
4.Throughout the Instinctive Drowning Response, drowning people cannot voluntarily control their arm movements. Physiologically, drowning people who are struggling on the surface of the water cannot stop drowning and perform voluntary movements such as waving for help, moving toward a rescuer, or reaching out for a piece of rescue equipment.
5.From beginning to end of the Instinctive Drowning Response people’s bodies remain upright in the water, with no evidence of a supporting kick. Unless rescued by a trained lifeguard, these drowning people can only struggle on the surface of the water from 20 to 60 seconds before submersion occurs.
(Source: On Scene Magazine: Fall 2006)

This doesn’t mean that a person that is yelling for help and thrashing isn’t in real trouble – they are experiencing aquatic distress. Not always present before the instinctive drowning response, aquatic distress doesn’t last long – but unlike true drowning, these victims can still assist in their own rescue. They can grab lifelines, throw rings, etc.

Look for these other signs of drowning when persons are n the water:

Head low in the water, mouth at water level
Head tilted back with mouth open
Eyes glassy and empty, unable to focus
Eyes closed
Hair over forehead or eyes
Not using legs – Vertical
Hyperventilating or gasping
Trying to swim in a particular direction but not making headway
Trying to roll over on the back
Ladder climb, rarely out of the water.
So if a crew member falls overboard and every looks O.K. – don’t be too sure. Sometimes the most common indication that someone is drowning is that they don’t look like they’re drowning. They may just look like they are treading water and looking up at the deck. One way to be sure? Ask them: “Are you alright?” If they can answer at all – they probably are. If they return a blank stare – you may have less than 30 seconds to get to them. And parents: children playing in the water make noise. When they get quiet, you get to them and find out why.


12 posted on 07/09/2010 8:31:16 AM PDT by Larry Lucido (You can evade reality, but you cannot evade the consequences of evading reality. ~Ayn Rand)
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To: ventanax5
Good read, thank you.
Children especially would revert to instincts and not be rational or obvious.

13 posted on 07/09/2010 8:31:29 AM PDT by BitWielder1 (Corporate Profits are better than Government Waste)
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To: Paved Paradise

I worked as a lifeguard on Lake Michigan for a couple of years.

Faking was pretty easy to spot. The people that were in real trouble always got a really stupid look on their faces - as in “Oh sh$%, I don’t know what to do!”


14 posted on 07/09/2010 8:32:01 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: ventanax5

Thank you for posting an EXCELLENT article. If you have children or grandchildren this is a MUST READ!


15 posted on 07/09/2010 8:32:09 AM PDT by Kartographer (".. we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes, and our sacred honor.")
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To: ventanax5

I just took the time to log in to say “thank you” for
posting this item. It goes into the 1. safety file and
2. Why TV is bad file. Anent the latter, I recall a
private detective writing (Blye Private Eye, a small
paperback book seen many years ago) that TV fosters
misconceptions at least as bad as this one about the
effects of blunt trauma, especially to the head.


16 posted on 07/09/2010 8:32:10 AM PDT by cycjec
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To: livius

It’s not splashes or flailing you look for. It’s struggle and desperation


17 posted on 07/09/2010 8:32:22 AM PDT by downwdims (It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority)
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To: ventanax5

I recall around 1982 I “rescued” 2 small kids in a pool, but 3 days apart. In each case, it was in about 4 feet of water and the child was just sinking down silently. What links both events was that their parents had taken their eyes off them for a few minutes...what also links both events was that each child had been using those small “water wing” floatation devices on their arms, but now they weren’t wearing them at the time of the near drowning. All I did was step in the direction of the child and pulled them to the surface. It was really quick and uneventful, when I aided each child. Their parents were certainly surprised that their child was in trouble.

My own kids were also in the pool, so I was actually looking out for all the kids there. I really believe that those water wing things give small children a false sense of security, and the minute they take them off, disaster can occur.


18 posted on 07/09/2010 8:35:35 AM PDT by FDNYRHEROES (In just His first 3 days, the War on Terror became the War on Free Speech.)
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To: ventanax5

Never read anything that says “must read”. Never.


19 posted on 07/09/2010 8:35:37 AM PDT by don-o (My son, Ben - Marine Lance Corporal texted me at 0330 on 2/3/10: AMERICA!)
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To: ventanax5
The new captain jumped from the cockpit, fully dressed, and sprinted through the water. A former lifeguard

BS !

The first thing you do, as I remember from MY training, is to strip to your shorts before you go rushing into the water.

ML/NJ

20 posted on 07/09/2010 8:36:17 AM PDT by ml/nj
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To: ventanax5; Fred Nerks; null and void; stockpirate; george76; PhilDragoo; Candor7; rxsid; ...

Must read.


21 posted on 07/09/2010 8:36:37 AM PDT by null and void (We are now in day 531 of our national holiday from reality. - 0bama really isn't one of US.)
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To: glorgau
Faking was pretty easy to spot.

Sort of reminds me of the fake drowning scene from Sandlot.

22 posted on 07/09/2010 8:37:25 AM PDT by wastedyears (The Founders revolted for less.)
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To: ClearCase_guy
Try being a middle-aged, white Texas father.

If Hollywood ran the world, that alone would be a felony.

And if your middle name happened to be Wayne...

23 posted on 07/09/2010 8:39:32 AM PDT by Tex-Con-Man
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To: ml/nj

I’m sure this is embellishment to help illustrate the Captain’s sense or urgency, but I agree, he should have at least kicked off his shoes!


24 posted on 07/09/2010 8:39:44 AM PDT by reegs
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To: reegs; ventanax5

I just recalled the terror I felt when my airway was
blocked by phlegm (bronchitis). It’s like nothing else
I can recall. I was just able to move enough to unblock
it. If drowning is like that, one has indeed about 10
to 30 seconds to act.


25 posted on 07/09/2010 8:40:21 AM PDT by cycjec
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To: Kartographer
Thank you for posting an EXCELLENT article. If you have children or grandchildren this is a MUST READ!

It should be passed along to anyone and everyone you know who is around or on the water.

Thank heavens for email, so easy to distribute information like this.

26 posted on 07/09/2010 8:40:52 AM PDT by TYVets
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To: wastedyears

Decent swimmers can’t fake drownings. They know how to keep their head up to well.


27 posted on 07/09/2010 8:40:56 AM PDT by downwdims (It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority)
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To: don-o
Never read anything that says “must read”. Never.

Never say never.

Make an exception to your rule this time.

Really.

28 posted on 07/09/2010 8:41:12 AM PDT by null and void (We are now in day 531 of our national holiday from reality. - 0bama really isn't one of US.)
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To: ClearCase_guy

Take a look at The Last Psychiatrist’s blog.
http://www.thelastpsychiatrist.com
Is there a FR keyword like whyTVisbad? if not
we need one.


29 posted on 07/09/2010 8:42:01 AM PDT by cycjec
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To: Larry Lucido

The original blog site worked fine to me in lynx.


30 posted on 07/09/2010 8:44:32 AM PDT by cycjec
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To: cycjec

Thread Hi-jack in progress....


31 posted on 07/09/2010 8:44:54 AM PDT by FDNYRHEROES (In just His first 3 days, the War on Terror became the War on Free Speech.)
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To: ventanax5

Lifesaving information BUMP


32 posted on 07/09/2010 8:45:31 AM PDT by thesearethetimes... ("Courage, is fear that has said its prayers." DorothyBernard)
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To: ventanax5

I can remember being rescued when I was young. I remember seeing these 2 girls sitting on the edge of the pool 3 feet away totally oblivious to my struggle. Fortunately, the lifeguard was also my babysitter and was on the lookout for me - and her station was about 75 feet away!


33 posted on 07/09/2010 8:45:38 AM PDT by RushingWater
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To: ventanax5

Thanks for this!

Very timely and informative - I posted it to my facebook.


34 posted on 07/09/2010 8:47:18 AM PDT by mommya
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To: FDNYRHEROES

Instead of bumping hit report abuse


35 posted on 07/09/2010 8:47:33 AM PDT by downwdims (It does not take a majority to prevail... but rather an irate, tireless minority)
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To: reegs

“fully dressed *may* have meant a t-shirt and shorts.
boat shoes kick off easily.


36 posted on 07/09/2010 8:48:13 AM PDT by cycjec
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To: ml/nj
The first thing you do, as I remember from MY training, is to strip to your shorts before you go rushing into the water

Depends on the situation. The parents were standing, so the water wasn't that deep. Removing his shoes might have helped, though, depending on the sea bed type.

I had the training, too.
37 posted on 07/09/2010 8:48:16 AM PDT by ConservativeWarrior (In last year's nests, there are no birds this year.)
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To: reegs

I was caught in a riptide at the beach in LA, but I didn’t realize it because of the wave action. It felt like I was moving forward, but I was being dragged back. A lifeguard spotted me and pulled me out. I was not yet in danger, but he saw a situation that I wasn’t aware of, that could have gotten worse quickly.

Drowning does not look like drowning, and humans are not amphibians. Interesting article.


38 posted on 07/09/2010 8:52:24 AM PDT by bboop (We don't need no stinkin' VAT)
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To: ClearCase_guy
I've been thinking a lot lately about how TV shows us a false reality.

Those of us involved in gun rights know exactly what you're talking about: "High powered" assault rifles, "Cop killer" bullets, shooting the gun out of the bad guy's hand. What's worse is that our idiot lawmakers believe that fluff. We've got laws here in California that are based on what legislators saw in kung fu movies back in the '70s. Ever wonder why things like Japanese shuriken are illegal here?

I hope I'm not hijacking the thread

Next stop, FReeper Island!

39 posted on 07/09/2010 8:52:44 AM PDT by Redcloak (What's your zombie plan?)
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To: null and void

I never knew this, null and void. Does that mean I watch too much TV?

Kidding aside, good article. Will file this info in my brain.


40 posted on 07/09/2010 8:53:32 AM PDT by azishot
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To: cripplecreek

If the person goes in and gasps for air underwater he probably wont come back up again.


41 posted on 07/09/2010 8:54:50 AM PDT by valkyry1
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To: livius

//they can’t call out for help or thrash around//

No they cant because they are not taking air, they are taking in water. It does not take long at all, 30 seconds or so like the article says.


42 posted on 07/09/2010 8:58:53 AM PDT by valkyry1
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To: frithguild

No comment reference bump ... ;-)


43 posted on 07/09/2010 9:00:02 AM PDT by Tunehead54 (Nothing funny here ;-)
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To: ventanax5

About 25 years ago I happened to come down to the beach where my wife and a German babysitter had taken the kids. One of my adult sons was then a toddler, I think around a year old.

Everyone was relaxed in the son, when I heard the next oldest daughter happily say, “Hey, look at Peter! He’s swimming!” I glanced down, and the youngest was floating face down in about a foot of water, not stirring or making a sound.

I rushed down and pulled him out. He was, fortunately, just fine, and not even very upset. Completely relaxed. But he would have drowned in another minute or two.

I guess my wife thought the babysitter was watching out for him, and vice versa.


44 posted on 07/09/2010 9:00:17 AM PDT by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: FDNYRHEROES

The first thing that child needs to be taught is how to swim, those things are incredibly dangerous, pretty much any flotation device is unless you already are a swimmer. My parents never let me wear then until my dad taught me how to swim when I was 7-8 I think


45 posted on 07/09/2010 9:03:43 AM PDT by dimk
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To: ventanax5

Excellent, excellent post. Thanks for sharing.


46 posted on 07/09/2010 9:04:01 AM PDT by bolobaby
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To: glorgau

>>The people that were in real trouble always got a really stupid look on their faces - as in “Oh sh$%, I don’t know what to do!”<<

Kinda like an Obama voter who just realized there’s BS in the soup.


47 posted on 07/09/2010 9:07:14 AM PDT by B4Ranch (Remember, guys, the enemy is to the left.)
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To: valkyry1; null and void

Null, thanks for pinging me.

I almost drowned on a beach on the Big Island which is notorious for drownings and rip tides. The drop off to deep water is very radical and it creates rips that are very dangerous. I was in my 30s and a very strong swimmer, was in water with around 20 other people up to the chest. I felt perfectly safe. I got in the rip and was instantly carried out, off to the side, and under the water in mere seconds. Around and around under the water, head bumping on sand, no way to know which way was “Up”.

Instantly I went into prayer (was automatic - not a conscious decision) and within a second was thrown on some rocks, maybe 100 feet or more down the side of the beach. I was trembling and bruised, and if I had not surfaced, my lungs would have been full of water.

I was always too afraid to swim in waves after that. Drowning is a terrible way to die.


48 posted on 07/09/2010 9:09:21 AM PDT by little jeremiah
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To: ventanax5

On a related note, “dry drowning” can occur hours after someone has been in water. Seems that there’s no end to what parents have to be alert for. They end up beating themselves up like this mom. Check out this site:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/110157.php


49 posted on 07/09/2010 9:20:03 AM PDT by 1951Boomer
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To: ventanax5
Years ago I was teaching swimming lessons to children at a public lake. Most of the people there were parents and their children who had come for the lessons. Others were there just to swim and picnic but during the lessons they were constrained to a certain area until the lessons were over.

My mother was on the shore watching my younger sibs taking their swim lesson's. She noticed a bobbing head in the water beyond where the lessons were taking place. The swimmer was wearing a swimming cap and was easy to spot. Mother said the swimmers head was just above the water line and there was no sound and no splashing water. The swimmer disappeared and my ever so shy mother went to the lifeguard and told him what she saw. They evacuated the lake and found the little girl. She was saved.

Two weeks later the little girl and her family thanked my mother. Later the owner of the lake later personally taught the little girl to swim. Libby

50 posted on 07/09/2010 9:22:02 AM PDT by libbytarian
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