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Is Childhood Obesity a Sign of Neglect?
Time.com - Wellness ^ | July 16, 2010 | Tiffany O'Callaghan

Posted on 07/17/2010 3:38:07 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX

So how can care providers determine when negligence or abuse is a cause of childhood obesity? The authors suggest that similar standards to other types of disease-related neglect be applied. That is, "parental failure to provide their children with adequate treatment for a chronic illness (asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, etc) is a well accepted reason for a child protection registration for neglect" and as such, failure to adhere to obesity treatment — missing appointments, refusing to support children with treatment programs or actively undermining those programs — should convey neglect, especially among children who are at high risk for obesity-related conditions such as type 2 diabetes, they argue. Yet, the authors stress, having adequate evidence of this negligence is key. "Clear objective evidence of this behaviour over a sustained period is required, and the treatment offered must have been adequate and evidence based."

(Excerpt) Read more at wellness.blogs.time.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: allyourchildrenare; belong2gubmint; children; government; obesity
This is from the UK, but expect it to arrive here soon. First they want everyone's BMI, next they will declare that children over a certain weight are being abused or neglected and will remove them from their homes.

This is truly frightening. It reminds me of the social engineering that took place in Nazi Germany in the attempt to produce a perfect race. Those who don't fit the mold were forced to comply or were eliminated.

1 posted on 07/17/2010 3:38:11 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Pining_4_TX
Childhood obesity is actually a sign of an eating disorder. Fat kids eat dis order and dat order.

Ha ha ha. Fat kids. Ha ha.

2 posted on 07/17/2010 3:42:07 PM PDT by Gurn (Remember Mountain Meadows.)
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To: Pining_4_TX

Childhood obesity is more of a product what happens when kids don’t go out and play. If they sit home on the computer, tv or are just not allowed to play do to neighborhood safety, they will likely be more chubby than those that play outside and run around like kids used to.


3 posted on 07/17/2010 3:46:39 PM PDT by Dutch Boy
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To: Pining_4_TX; Gurn; Dutch Boy

Let’s not deceive ourselves here, this has nothing to do with childhood obesity. It’s just another excuse to expand the power of the state.


4 posted on 07/17/2010 3:51:07 PM PDT by sinanju
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To: Pining_4_TX

It’s another means to break up the family.

I’ve been wondering why the Obama administration and the Democrats in Congress have been mostly mum about homeschooling. I think an easy back door to controlling one’s children is through the doctor’s visit. I took my third child in for his 5-year-old shots for sports, etc., and I felt myself feeling angry that soon the government will have access to our health information. It made me resent and distrust the doctor. I turned down a urinalysis because the nurse had just let my son go to the potty and laughed at him when he mentioned ‘peeing in a cup’. Five minutes later, when the lady doctor asked for a urinalysis, I said ‘tough luck!’. If I had known it was required, I would have had my son do it at the point he asked the nurse to use the restroom. I don’t tolerate them wasting my time very well. (They wanted me to return at a later date with the sample - NO). I had to argue with the doctor about the nurse’s incompetence, and it got nasty! (And I am a very meek person, but I’d had enough). My son is perfectly healthy, anyway.

I am NOT a paranoid person. I am not anti-shots, etc. But having lived through 18 years of public school, I’m well aware of how choices are nearly completely stripped away from parents, and how a child’s privacy is completely given over to the state. I remember physicals in middle school that I shouldn’t have been subjected to, etc. My parents didn’t even sign a permission slip.

Just a minor rant.

“Dr.” George McGovern blew it with the “food pyramid”. Now there is a possibility that there are other reasons for obesity that we don’t yet understand.

http://www.physorg.com/news198518697.html


5 posted on 07/17/2010 3:52:40 PM PDT by agrarianlady
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To: Dutch Boy; wintertime

Health at Every Size http://www.haescommunity.org/

Show me chunky parents and they will probably have chunky kids, no matter what they do or eat. Show me tall or short parents and the kids will be of similar height. This remains true even when kids are adopted. Kids still look like their biological parents.


6 posted on 07/17/2010 3:53:03 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Pining_4_TX
Maybe, just maybe, the schools shouldn't be feeding these kids. Just provide milk at lunch....and stop saying the fat is no good for you. Just drink the damn milk.

Allergic??? All of a sudden, everyone is allergic.

7 posted on 07/17/2010 3:55:52 PM PDT by Sacajaweau (What)
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To: Pining_4_TX

Yeah this all sounds like the National Socialist

Some interesting thoughts:
The Moral Failure of German Medicine

The complicity of German physicians in the Nazis’ crimes against humanity is a well-established historical fact. Explaining that fact is far more difficult. Why were German doctors such avid fans of fascism? Why did nearly half of all German physicians join the Nazi party?

I don’t think it was the tirades of Julius Streicher in Der Stürmer that attracted their interest, but rather the promises of Nazi leaders to solve Germany’s problems medically, surgically. The Nazi state was supposed to be a hygienic state; Nazism was supposed to be “applied biology” (Fritz Lenz coined this phrase in 1931). Hitler was celebrated as the “great doctor” of German society and as the “Robert Koch of politics” (Koch was a nineteenth century pioneer in studying the bacterial origin of diseases). The seductive power of National Socialism for many physicians lay in its promise to cleanse German society of its corrupting elements — not just communism and Jews, but also metallic lead and addictive tobacco, along with homosexuality and the “burdensome” mentally ill.

The relation of science and politics in Nazi Germany was therefore more complex than most people like to think. Part of the misunderstanding, I would suggest, lies in the widely accepted belief that when science is politicized, “real” science inevitably suffers: the freedom of scientists is abrogated, distorting biases are introduced into research, minds are closed, avenues of inquiry are blocked. In many areas of science, of course, that is indeed what happened in Nazi Germany; one thinks of the fate of Einstein’s relativity theory, for example. But in other areas — e.g., many areas of public health — that was not the case at all.

http://www.adl.org/braun/dim_14_1_nazi_med.asp


8 posted on 07/17/2010 3:57:17 PM PDT by Marty62 (marty60)
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To: agrarianlady

I know what you mean! I found out from my daughter-in-law that doctors are required to ask all kinds of intrusive questions at well child visits. I’m glad you stood up for yourself.

We started homeschooling in the 80s when it was still somewhat of a novelty, and we had a neighbor turn us in because our kids were not in school. I can’t tell you how scared I was when the truant officer showed up at our door. It turned out OK, but knowing that these people would be more than happy to take my kids away from me made me distrust government completely. The phrase “the banality of evil” comes to mind.


9 posted on 07/17/2010 3:58:28 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Pining_4_TX

This will be interesting, because you know that the BMI thingy will be deemed racist. (Seriously.)


10 posted on 07/17/2010 3:58:37 PM PDT by keats5 (Not all of us are hypnotized.)
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To: Pining_4_TX

Yes.


11 posted on 07/17/2010 3:58:43 PM PDT by Paperdoll (REGISTER TO VOTE THEN DO IT RIGHT!)
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To: Pining_4_TX

No, it is not. It is wrong to make eating a mental battle between you and your child. Tell him that it’s better to exercise more, and eat less, but if he (or she) eats a lot of healthy carbs, and chooses NOT to exercise, even if you go with him, then let him be. I am talking about an overweight kid and not a grossly obese one.

If your child is grossly obese, it is time for some mental assistance. It’s not the eating ALONE. Maybe he is scared or left alone too much, or is trying to satisfy much more important needs with food. He needs some positive behavior therapy and some “Jillian Michaels” probing, though very kindly, into why he might have gotten this heavy. Of course a med eval is required first too, as some conditions cause weight gain (as do some medications).

Kids come in all sizes, thin and chubby, tall and short. It’s OK!!!!


12 posted on 07/17/2010 3:58:43 PM PDT by Yaelle
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To: Pining_4_TX

Guess the Dums will need to BREED it out of society. /S


13 posted on 07/17/2010 3:59:19 PM PDT by Marty62 (marty60)
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To: Pining_4_TX

Let me guess: The state will take over care of such children and make them into Obama Youth? Am I close?


14 posted on 07/17/2010 4:01:48 PM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (Soapbox & Ballot Box or Ammo Box.)
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To: keats5

You are right. I had not thought about that. Since minorities have higher rates of obesity than whites, I wonder how they will avoid the charge of racism? Unfortunately, minorities have been so conditioned to do what government tells them, that they may not even resist.


15 posted on 07/17/2010 4:01:53 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Pining_4_TX
If this is going to be adopted in the U.S., then Michelle can be the first one to be prosecuted.
16 posted on 07/17/2010 4:03:47 PM PDT by notpoliticallycorewrecked (According to the MSM, I'm a fringe sitting, pajama wearing, Freeper)
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To: Dutch Boy

Here in New York City many inner city kids are obese. They don’t go out and play because their neighborhoods are gang infested. Random bullets shooting people isn’t uncommon. The schools should have more phys ed classes. Why are those programs the first ones cut? Lazy parenting is also a problem. Throw some money at a kid and off the McDonalds they go. Of course you can healthier fare at McDonalds but they don’t know who to make the right choices.


17 posted on 07/17/2010 4:04:11 PM PDT by LottieDah (If only those who speak so eloquently on the rights of animals would do so on behalf the unborn)
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To: agrarianlady

Absolutely. Totalitarian regimes always attempt to wrest children away from their parents. That way they can be thoroughly indoctrinated by those in power.


18 posted on 07/17/2010 4:04:25 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Pining_4_TX

“Unfortunately, minorities have been so conditioned to do what government tells them, that they may not even resist.”

It doesn’t matter what color your skin is. Any mother worth her salt will fight with all she has when someone tries to take her children away.


19 posted on 07/17/2010 4:05:23 PM PDT by keats5 (Not all of us are hypnotized.)
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To: keats5

Perhaps, but especially poor parents often feel powerless against authority. Some don’t know how to fight after being dependent on government all their lives.


20 posted on 07/17/2010 4:09:57 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Sacajaweau
Maybe, just maybe, the schools shouldn't be feeding these kids.

I agree. I send my daughter's lunch with her to school, because the menu is aweful. All processed. And some children eat both breakfast and lunch at school, then also during the summer (most schools in poor neighborhoods provide free summer lunch and breakfasts.
21 posted on 07/17/2010 4:09:59 PM PDT by kiki04 ("If a little knowledge is dangerous, where is a man who has so much as to be out of danger?" - THH)
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To: Sacajaweau; wintertime
Maybe, just maybe, the schools shouldn't be feeding these kids.

Bingo.

School breakfasts and school lunches = carbohydrate bombs, industrial oils, processed "meats", and other manufactured products. People are not only letting the schools fill their kids' heads with toxic waste, but their stomachs too. Both mind and body have been sacrificed to the beast system. Then the children come home to... wholesome, home-cooked meals? Not consistently or at all, if the parents work all day long, or if unemployment means subsistence on ramen. More processed food down the hatch. "Convenience foods" are convenient alright, in a Church Lady kind of way.

22 posted on 07/17/2010 4:20:41 PM PDT by Ezekiel (The Obama-nation began with the Inauguration of Desolation.)
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To: keats5

FYI:
BMI not a health measure. BMI was never meant to be a diagnostic tool, and children with BMIs over these arbitrary cut-offs on growth curves do not necessarily have clinical complications or health risks, according to CDC health scientists. After its comprehensive review of the evidence, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) concluded that there is no quality evidence to support that childhood “overweight” or “obesity” is related to health outcomes. The evidence shows that BMI fails to predict fitness, blood pressure, body composition or health risk. Even a recent 50-year prospective study found no association between children’s BMI and heart disease later in life, and other research has found weight to be unrelated to children’s risks for insulin resistance.

http://junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/2008/03/school-childhood-obesity-and-bmi.html


23 posted on 07/17/2010 4:28:15 PM PDT by Marty62 (marty60)
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To: Pining_4_TX

The obesity problem in this country is all too real. Sadly, there has been way too much political bluster. When all the bluster is removed, the hard truth is that the parents of a child have the responsibility to teach that child to make prudent choices regarding what they eat and how they spend their time. If the parents are not diligent, no intervention by the government or the schools will work.

Never in history has more information been readily available to parents regarding concerning the specifics of those choices. Yes, big agribusiness has complicated those choices regarding food - as demonstrated by the documentary film, Food Inc (highly recommended.) That said, good nutrition choices are available - even to families with limited incomes. Beans, nuts, whole grain rice, oatmeal, raisins, frozen vegetables, and other nutritious foods can be purchased in bulk at reasonable cost. Fresh fruit and veggies are available in season at reasonable costs at farmers’ markets. These are much better choices than highly processed fast foods. Parents just need to determine to make good choices and teach these to their children. I would note that one can buy a lot of nutritious food for the cost of the diabetes medication typically required by the consequences of obesity produced by a steady diet of fast food combined with a sedentary life style.

Most communities have parks and places where one can walk safely. Walking is a great inexpensive exercise. Running, swimming, and cycling are also great exercise but cost more. Again, I would note that the cost of any of these is much lower than the cost of treating obesity related illness.

My comments are not just theoretical. I have fought the battle with obesity my entire life. In May 2009 I was 334 lbs and totally unfit. My wife and I made some major changes in our diet and exercise and today I am 200 lbs and training for a fall marathon. I am planning and working to lose an additional 30 lbs. The key is making prudent personal choices daily regarding diet/nutrition, exercise, and time management. Always remember that nobody will care more about your well being than you will. Also note that there are great communities of recreational athletes who typically welcome and assist new comers. It all starts with a personal decision to get up off that couch and turn off that TV or computer.


24 posted on 07/17/2010 4:34:17 PM PDT by RochesterFan
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To: Marty62

Yes, well that’s what happens when politicians start diagnosing medical conditions.

Uggh! I want my country back!


25 posted on 07/17/2010 4:37:44 PM PDT by keats5 (Not all of us are hypnotized.)
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To: Pining_4_TX
Neglect?

Yeah, that's what it is! Nom, nom, nom...

Hey Mom...got any more noms?


26 posted on 07/17/2010 4:39:52 PM PDT by SonOfDarkSkies (Does building demolition count as a Muslim engineering achievement?)
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To: Marty62
BMI is just a guide and a starting place for a discussion with one's personal physician. Body fat measurements are more reliable but more costly and time consuming. I would note that if one has a BMI significantly in the overweight or obese range, that it should trigger a discussion with one's personal physician and typically some lifestyle changes.

As a nation we tend to be grossly overweight and unfit. The rise in the rates of type-II diabetes in children at increasingly younger ages is appalling. You might be interested in the recent report, "Too fat to fight," that shows an alarming number of young people are unsuitable for military service even with what my son (an Army captain) affectionately refers to as 'fat kid boot camp.'

27 posted on 07/17/2010 4:45:50 PM PDT by RochesterFan
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To: RochesterFan

You are entirely right, but you are likely to hear from a contingent on FR that will sob into their computers that “you just don’t understand - my thyroid makes me weight 400 lbs (or perhaps its a food allegy or “low” metabolism” or corn syrup or space aliens).

I have to manage my weight, too, by exercise and watching what I eat. Those who don’t do this eventually tend to become obese. There is nothing magical or special about one’s circumstances.

Very good of you to mention making the right choices. One of the reasons we have so many fat “poor people” is that our economy produces food in such abundance that prices are low, and people who tend to make bad decisions in other parts of their lives tend to make them with respect to eating and exercise.


28 posted on 07/17/2010 4:47:50 PM PDT by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: RochesterFan

You are entirely right, but you are likely to hear from a contingent on FR that will sob into their computers that “you just don’t understand - my thyroid makes me weight 400 lbs (or perhaps its a food allegy or “low” metabolism” or corn syrup or space aliens).

I have to manage my weight, too, by exercise and watching what I eat. Those who don’t do this eventually tend to become obese. There is nothing magical or special about one’s circumstances.

Very good of you to mention making the right choices. One of the reasons we have so many fat “poor people” is that our economy produces food in such abundance that prices are low, and people who tend to make bad decisions in other parts of their lives tend to make them with respect to eating and exercise.


29 posted on 07/17/2010 4:48:00 PM PDT by achilles2000 ("I'll agree to save the whales as long as we can deport the liberals")
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To: RochesterFan

I remember when PE was mandatory in schools. To bad PARENTS stopped it. Little Johnny or Janey might get sweaty.


30 posted on 07/17/2010 5:00:11 PM PDT by Marty62 (marty60)
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To: Marty62

You are right. My wife is a teacher and she would love to see her students get regular PE. They need to get some exercise, blow off some steam, and get some oxygen to their brains so they can concentrate in class. By the way, she says her students (mainly juniors and seniors) are the most over-indulged youth she has ever seen. She wonders how they will survive in college or a job.


31 posted on 07/17/2010 5:09:40 PM PDT by RochesterFan
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To: Pining_4_TX

Let’s see: dodgeball is forbidden, tag is forbidden, all really fun playground equipment has been torn out of schoolyards and public parks as “dangerous”, and most parents (in many neighborhoods of cities with good reason, but even in small towns and suburbs out of exaggerated fear of kidnappers and paedophiles) won’t let their kids just go out and run around the neighborhood with their friends.

Top that up with not only replacing sugar with high fructose corn syrup (hfcs) but putting it into products that never had sweeteners before, and is there any wonder kids are tubbier than in previous generations. (And yes, there really is reason to think hfcs is baleful stuff—studies with rats comparing rats given unlimited access to a solution of hfcs and rats given unlimited access to a solution of sucrose with the same caloric content per unit volume found the rats getting corn syrup would drink themselves into obesity, while the ones getting table sugar didn’t. Worse, large abouts of hfcs cause liver scarring of the sort normally associated with alcoholism. There’s a reason the corn industry pulled those ads with the “you know what they say about it” “what? it’s sweet?” claiming the stuff is interchangable with sugar: the studies I just referred to got published.)


32 posted on 07/17/2010 5:23:15 PM PDT by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know. . .)
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To: Marty62

Thank you for the very useful link!


33 posted on 07/17/2010 5:39:02 PM PDT by jonrick46 (We're being water boarded with the sewage of Fabian Socialism.)
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To: LottieDah

Here in New York City many inner city kids are obese. They don’t go out and play because their neighborhoods are gang infested. Random bullets shooting people isn’t uncommon. The schools should have more phys ed classes.

The schools shouldn’t have more phys ed classes. The city government should empty the neighborhoods of the feral animals who are holding the communities hostage so the kids can have a life.


34 posted on 07/17/2010 5:58:07 PM PDT by Chickensoup (The Acting President....is an incompetent puppet of Soros.)
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To: RochesterFan

Congratulations on the weight loss.


35 posted on 07/17/2010 6:12:18 PM PDT by B4Ranch (Remember, guys, the enemy is to the left and the middle.)
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To: Pining_4_TX

What was the Ben Franklin quote about the do-gooder?


36 posted on 07/17/2010 6:18:32 PM PDT by dannyboy72a (The President of the United States should not be selling me insurance or lightbulbs)
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To: Pining_4_TX

It’s hard to argue when I’m walking through the urban areas of NJ and NY where you will see a few dozen kids who fall within the ‘morbidly obese’ clinical definition. Kids who have arms so fat they can’t reach the top of their head with their hands, kids with bellies so big they can’t see their feet.

There aren’t good free market solutions here do to the multidecade realization that market forces do not work, large swathes of adults with responsiblities to oversee childrens’ nutrition, the parents, in loci parenti guardians such as school cafeterias and subsidized daycares, the Madison Ave marketeers, and the food business have failed to provide for the most basic of common good on many many fronts.

This happened before in the United States, look up the history of “swill milk” in Colonial and post-Colonial America, I see it as an historical equivalent to the problems of today.


37 posted on 07/17/2010 6:20:19 PM PDT by JerseyHighlander
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To: Marty62

“...the freedom of scientists is abrogated, distorting biases are introduced into research, minds are closed, avenues of inquiry are blocked”

Same with education, art, religion. Yes, religion. The knowledge of God is infinite, yes?


38 posted on 07/17/2010 6:21:40 PM PDT by huldah1776
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To: huldah1776

That line reminded me of the GW/CC Fraud.

They definitly have closed minds, they certainly introduced bias (hockey stick trick), and they stopped ANY discussion of scientific research that proved their claims were false.


39 posted on 07/17/2010 6:55:22 PM PDT by Marty62 (marty60)
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To: The_Reader_David; dannyboy72a; JerseyHighlander

“The urge to save humanity is almost always only a false-face for the urge to rule it.” ~ H.L. Mencken


40 posted on 07/17/2010 9:00:41 PM PDT by Pining_4_TX
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To: Chickensoup

“The city government should empty the neighborhoods of the feral animals who are holding the communities hostage so the kids can have a life.”

From your keyboard to God’s eyes, ears and hands.


41 posted on 07/19/2010 8:29:42 AM PDT by LottieDah (If only those who speak so eloquently on the rights of animals would do so on behalf the unborn)
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