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VJ Day Open Thread: ‘My Father Served in World War II’(Tell Your Story)
bigjournalism.com ^ | Aug. 15, 2010 | Frank Ross

Posted on 08/15/2010 5:59:12 PM PDT by PROCON

Today is the 65th Anniversary of VJ Day, or Victory over Japan Day.

Did your Dad or other relatives serve against Japan in WWII?

(Excerpt) Read more at bigjournalism.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: vetscor; vetscorner; ww2; wwii
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My Dad, who has been gone for 22 years served with the Army in the Pacific, with the 81st Infantry "Wildcat" Division, during WWII.

He told me countless stories of the brutality and inhumanity of the Japanese soldier.

My point:

The 2 Atom bombs dropped on Nagasaki and Hiroshima were justifiable to end the atrocities, and it saved the lives of countless other American soldiers, sailors and marines who might of otherwise invaded the Japanese mainland!

1 posted on 08/15/2010 5:59:15 PM PDT by PROCON
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To: PROCON

My father served with the 63d Infantry Regiment, 6th Infantry Division in New Guinea and Luzon. He was wounded in action on Luzon in April, 1945. We both served in Vietnam and his grandson served two tours of duty in Iraq.

Three generations of Combat Infantryman’s Badges and Purple Hearts.


2 posted on 08/15/2010 6:04:17 PM PDT by centurion316
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To: PROCON

My Uncle Giles joined the Navy at 17 in November, 1941. He served in the Pacific. After the war, he came home, returned to high school and graduated in my dad’s class. I think my uncle was at Coral Sea and Midway

My dad idolized my uncle. One of the few times I saw my dad cry was when “Anchors Aweigh” was played at my uncle’s funeral.

Japanese atrocities were no secret to us. We heard all about their atrocities against the Chinese and also about the Bataan death march.

I think I’ve done my duty and told the kids about the imperial Japanese — they sowed the wind and reaped the whirlwind at the end of the war.


3 posted on 08/15/2010 6:04:35 PM PDT by Cloverfarm (This too shall pass ...)
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To: PROCON

My Favorite Uncle was a Captain of Marines during the War. I don’t know what outfit he was with, he never said, but I suspect the 4th Marine Div. He was retired with a medical discharge, the results of some strange tropical disease that I never knew the name of(not malaria).


4 posted on 08/15/2010 6:06:32 PM PDT by calex59
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To: PROCON

Yes, in the Coast Guards, during WW II, on the ship the Ambrose.


5 posted on 08/15/2010 6:06:58 PM PDT by Biggirl (AZ Is DOING THE JOB The Feds Should Be Doing, ENFORCING The Southern Border! =^..^=)
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To: centurion316
Three generations of Combat Infantryman’s Badges and Purple Hearts.

Awesome!!

Thank you for your Service!!

6 posted on 08/15/2010 6:07:31 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: centurion316

Yes indeed! Thank you for your service!


7 posted on 08/15/2010 6:09:20 PM PDT by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis
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To: PROCON
My Dad served on the destroyer USS Perkins and the cruiser USS Oakland. He saw action in many of the main battles in the Pacific. His ship (the USS Oakland) was also in a typhoon. He passed away in 1984 leaving me to regret not asking him more about his experiences.
8 posted on 08/15/2010 6:10:17 PM PDT by willk
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To: willk
He passed away in 1984 leaving me to regret not asking him more about his experiences.

Me too, FRiend..:=(

9 posted on 08/15/2010 6:12:02 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: PROCON

The bombs actually saved more Japanese lives than Americans and allies. The invasion of Japan would have seen bloodshed on an unimaginable scale.


10 posted on 08/15/2010 6:13:04 PM PDT by HerrBlucher (In the White House the mighty White House the Liar sleeps tonight.............)
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To: PROCON
My family and I was at a restaurant the other day and after my son (16) went to the bathroom, he mentioned there was a man sitting in the front with a WWII hat on. My son asked me if I thought he was in WWII or just wearing a hat. I told him the man is old enough to have been in WWII,so after dinner, I told my kids we are going and thank him. Ok, they are teens and were a bit apprehensive, but I walked up and it seemed those in the booth with him knew what I was about to ask. I said sir, my son noticed your hat and we wanted to know if you served in WWII, he say “Yes, I most certainly did” I told him we wanted to thank him. I then asked him where, he said in Europe for two years. He was just a boy, 18 and the second year “he took one in the chest”. I wanted him to go on....everyone around us was listening, and the woman across the table who I assume was his daughter had this look like she was so proud of her father. I asked him if he had written the events somewhere, his daughter(?) shook her head no, almost regretful, this beautiful, kind and peaceful looking gentleman, said “ I really just want to forget”. How could I be so insensitive......I told him, I was sorry, but I hope we never forget their courage and their service.....He then said “we wont as long as folks like you keep telling your children” I was so proud, I wanted to hug him, but I knew that would not be right, so I just shook his hand, my daughter and my son did as well. As we were walking out, my 16 year old son said “that was so cool”.

God Bless our wonderful Veterans! I WILL NEVER FORGET!

11 posted on 08/15/2010 6:13:19 PM PDT by Texas4ever (God is in control!)
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To: PROCON

Every year I shop a newly wordsmithed revision of this oped about, but no luck yet. This year the the Washington Times published a highly compressed version, seemed a feelings piece without the analysis. Anyway, here is the latest full version.

Dropping Japan Atomic Bombs Unavoidable

We recently marked the 65th anniversary for dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II, and must listen to the revisionists expound on what a tragic and profoundly immoral decision was made. However, advocates for these seminal events often cite avoiding the catastrophic casualties unavoidable if troops landed on the home islands. People extrapolate from 48,000 American and 230,000 Japanese losses at Okinawa to 500,000 American and millions of Japanese casualties for mainland invasions.

Those estimates could have vastly understated causalities. Japan at 374,000 mountainous square miles mathematically enables over 500 defensive redoubts comparable to that General Ushijima’s constructed to inflict most losses for the Okinawa invasion. Also, the Japanese planned as stubborn defenses of their cities as the Russians had maintained in Stalingrad and Leningrad.

The War Faction adopted the motto of “100 million Japanese deaths” for planning the final mainland battles. Besides kamikazes, redeployed Kwantung divisions from China, and bamboo spears for civilians, allies faced biological warfare. Occupation searchers uncovered large stockpiles of viruses, spirochetes, and fungus spores throughout rural Japan. These biological pathogens had already been tested on Chinese civilians. For Japan one delivery plan directed Japanese to infect themselves then surrender. The “Greatest Generation” and their parents would have been enraged to discover a cabal indulged personal moral orthodoxy by condemning over 500,000 Americans who might otherwise have been saved.

I have not seen mentioned the critical role Kokutai played in surrender. Any prominent Japanese lived out this spiritual combination of Emperor, citizen, land, ancestral spirits, government, and Shinto religion. Hirohito foresaw the inevitability of defeat and had appointed a “Peace Faction” in January 1944. However, he and advisors debated through twenty months of continuous defeats, fire bombings of over 60 cities, and 1.3 million additional Japanese deaths. The atomic bombs removed the “Final Battles” argument, allowing the “War Faction” to relent, Hirohito to assume his unprecedented roll, and no one to lose face. They remained within the fabric of Japanese from all eras who had sacrificed for Emperor and Empire.

People say Japan was in the process of surrendering, but Japanese negotiation initiatives proved too vacuous to make dropping the atomic bombs unnecessary. Supposed negotiations cite proposals Foreign Minister Togo directed Ambassador Sato to offer Molotov. Japan intended achieving Russia neutrality with incentives including conquered Chinese territory, and thereby have it mediate settlement for Imperial visions of “peace with honor”. The first June 29 contacts ignored surrender with proposals the Russians considered too vague to answer. The August 2 proposals accepted the Potsdam Declaration as one basis for further study regarding terms. When Ambassador Sato finally saw Molotov on August 8, two days after Hiroshima, he received a war declaration instead of answers to his latest proposals. U.S. cryptologists reading “Magic” confirmed even Sato considered Togo’s Russian contacts ineffectual. Other contacts like those by Admiral Fujimura and Kojimo Kitamura with Allen Dulles in Switzerland lacked Cabinet knowledge.

The Japanese Cabinet debated the “Final Battles” arguments into utter physical and mental exhaustion for eleven hours following the Nagasaki bomb on August 9. In the final meeting of Hirohito and his Cabinet, Barron Hiranuma reproved Foreign Minister Togo for never making concrete proposals to the Russians. Minister Togo had no answer.

At impasse Hirohito, the god-king, spoke the “Voice of the Crane” in the 30’ by 18’ sweltering, underground bunker. He would bear the unbearable, conclude the war, and transform the nation. Only then did Japan contact Swiss and Swedish foreign offices to commence negotiations with allied belligerents.

A final point says the bombs accomplished little. Supposedly Roosevelt’s decree of unconditional surrender was compromised away by allowing Japan to keep their Emperor. However, Imperial Japan abandoned its heritage by accepting the Potsdam Declaration provisions demanding the Emperor’s and government’s authority be subject to the Supreme Allied Commander. The Japanese people’s free expression would determine ultimate government, eradicating multi-millennial Imperial characteristics. An approximate Western historical disruption would be displaying the bones of Jesus at the Vatican.


12 posted on 08/15/2010 6:13:59 PM PDT by Retain Mike
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To: PROCON

My dad, whose funeral was a year ago today, was a medic (pharmacists mate second class) at the Aeia Naval Hospital in Honolulu. He helped lots of guys who were dying and chopped up. Never talked much about it. In his later years he was pretty much anti-war.


13 posted on 08/15/2010 6:14:36 PM PDT by duckworth (Perhaps instant karma's going to get you. Perhaps not.)
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To: PROCON
My father enlisted on his 18th birthday (28FEB1945)in the Navy - he went to radioman school and was serving in a clerical position when the war ended. But for the dropping of the A-Bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, he would have been deployed for the invasion of Japan. Had that occurred, I probably would never have been born. As it was, my father was called up in the Korean War after having gone to college under the GI Bill, and served on a destroyer, USS Borie, DD-704 - which cleared the minefields for the Inchon landing. He then stayed in the Navy, was commissioned in the Medical Service Corps and served until 1969, when he retired. He was on the ground in Vietnam in 1964-65. His last official act in the Navy was to present me with my Purple Heart on 25Aug1969, about an hour before his retirement ceremony. We are all very proud of him, and obviously endorse the dropping of the bombs. The Japanese sowed the wind at Pearl Harbor and reaped the whirlwind at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Their atrocities are worthy of unusual note. Rape of Nanjing, Bataan Death March - Kamikazes - I could go on at length. The bombs were a quick and necessary end to the war - saved untold numbers of American as well as Japanese lives.

Lamh Foistenach Abu!
14 posted on 08/15/2010 6:15:16 PM PDT by ConorMacNessa (HM/2 USN, 3/5 Marines, RVN '69 - St. Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle!)
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To: PROCON

Every year I shop a newly wordsmithed revision of this oped about, but no luck yet. This year the the Washington Times published a highly compressed version, seemed a feelings piece without the analysis. Anyway, here is the latest full version.

Dropping Japan Atomic Bombs Unavoidable

We recently marked the 65th anniversary for dropping atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki to end WW II, and must listen to the revisionists expound on what a tragic and profoundly immoral decision was made. However, advocates for these seminal events often cite avoiding the catastrophic casualties unavoidable if troops landed on the home islands. People extrapolate from 48,000 American and 230,000 Japanese losses at Okinawa to 500,000 American and millions of Japanese casualties for mainland invasions.

Those estimates could have vastly understated causalities. Japan at 374,000 mountainous square miles mathematically enables over 500 defensive redoubts comparable to that General Ushijima’s constructed to inflict most losses for the Okinawa invasion. Also, the Japanese planned as stubborn defenses of their cities as the Russians had maintained in Stalingrad and Leningrad.

The War Faction adopted the motto of “100 million Japanese deaths” for planning the final mainland battles. Besides kamikazes, redeployed Kwantung divisions from China, and bamboo spears for civilians, allies faced biological warfare. Occupation searchers uncovered large stockpiles of viruses, spirochetes, and fungus spores throughout rural Japan. These biological pathogens had already been tested on Chinese civilians. For Japan one delivery plan directed Japanese to infect themselves then surrender. The “Greatest Generation” and their parents would have been enraged to discover a cabal indulged personal moral orthodoxy by condemning over 500,000 Americans who might otherwise have been saved.

I have not seen mentioned the critical role Kokutai played in surrender. Any prominent Japanese lived out this spiritual combination of Emperor, citizen, land, ancestral spirits, government, and Shinto religion. Hirohito foresaw the inevitability of defeat and had appointed a “Peace Faction” in January 1944. However, he and advisors debated through twenty months of continuous defeats, fire bombings of over 60 cities, and 1.3 million additional Japanese deaths. The atomic bombs removed the “Final Battles” argument, allowing the “War Faction” to relent, Hirohito to assume his unprecedented roll, and no one to lose face. They remained within the fabric of Japanese from all eras who had sacrificed for Emperor and Empire.

People say Japan was in the process of surrendering, but Japanese negotiation initiatives proved too vacuous to make dropping the atomic bombs unnecessary. Supposed negotiations cite proposals Foreign Minister Togo directed Ambassador Sato to offer Molotov. Japan intended achieving Russia neutrality with incentives including conquered Chinese territory, and thereby have it mediate settlement for Imperial visions of “peace with honor”. The first June 29 contacts ignored surrender with proposals the Russians considered too vague to answer. The August 2 proposals accepted the Potsdam Declaration as one basis for further study regarding terms. When Ambassador Sato finally saw Molotov on August 8, two days after Hiroshima, he received a war declaration instead of answers to his latest proposals. U.S. cryptologists reading “Magic” confirmed even Sato considered Togo’s Russian contacts ineffectual. Other contacts like those by Admiral Fujimura and Kojimo Kitamura with Allen Dulles in Switzerland lacked Cabinet knowledge.

The Japanese Cabinet debated the “Final Battles” arguments into utter physical and mental exhaustion for eleven hours following the Nagasaki bomb on August 9. In the final meeting of Hirohito and his Cabinet, Barron Hiranuma reproved Foreign Minister Togo for never making concrete proposals to the Russians. Minister Togo had no answer.

At impasse Hirohito, the god-king, spoke the “Voice of the Crane” in the 30’ by 18’ sweltering, underground bunker. He would bear the unbearable, conclude the war, and transform the nation. Only then did Japan contact Swiss and Swedish foreign offices to commence negotiations with allied belligerents.

A final point says the bombs accomplished little. Supposedly Roosevelt’s decree of unconditional surrender was compromised away by allowing Japan to keep their Emperor. However, Imperial Japan abandoned its heritage by accepting the Potsdam Declaration provisions demanding the Emperor’s and government’s authority be subject to the Supreme Allied Commander. The Japanese people’s free expression would determine ultimate government, eradicating multi-millennial Imperial characteristics. An approximate Western historical disruption would be displaying the bones of Jesus at the Vatican.


15 posted on 08/15/2010 6:15:26 PM PDT by Retain Mike
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To: PROCON

—uncle, now 92 spent some time (sixty missions,IIRC), over Burma in a B-24 based in India-—dropped lots of high explosives on Jap installations-—


16 posted on 08/15/2010 6:15:37 PM PDT by rellimpank (--don't believe anything the MSM tells you about firearms or explosives--NRA Benefactor)
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To: PROCON

My father served in WWII, in I think, the 1st Cav....He was in the battle of the hedge rows and recieved a bronze star. He never talked to me about his experiences there but when he died my aunt told me some of his stories...Wow...


17 posted on 08/15/2010 6:16:14 PM PDT by hstacey (Army Mom...)
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To: Texas4ever
Great story!

Unfortunately, there aren't too many WWII vets left!..:=(

18 posted on 08/15/2010 6:16:20 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: PROCON

My father, now deceased, served in the North Atlantic during WWII. The army broke up his outfit after VE Day.

He was home on leave when the bomb was dropped and was quite relieved that the war was over and he wouldn’t have to participate in the invasion of Japan.

So instead of spending that fall on the beaches of Honshu, he was getting processed out of the Army at Indiantown Gap.


19 posted on 08/15/2010 6:19:03 PM PDT by I_Like_Spam
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To: PROCON

My father was in the army and was a diesel mechanic for the supply trains. His unit served under General Patton when he stormed across France. Later on he was sent to Aroostook county (potatoes land and very cold) Maine to serve as a guard in a German POW camp. The prisoners were kept busy cutting down trees and at the trades. One prisoner crafted an exquisite hope chest that is still in the family

From time to time a POW would escape and would eventually be found working in a German restaurant in Boston or NYC. There was no heavy punishment for escaping, it was treated as a joke. This was late in the war when everybody knew Germany was going to be defeated


20 posted on 08/15/2010 6:19:27 PM PDT by dennisw (2012)
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To: PROCON
My father was in delayed enlistment for the Navy's pilot training program in 1944. But when he turned 18 and enlisted he had grown one inch and was disqualified (he was 6'6” tall). He ended up a fireman on the baby flat top USS Block Island. A few years ago my brothers and I got him to finally tell us about it.

His ship picked up the American POWs and carried them back to an island with a hospital. They gave them shorts and a t shirt and burned the clothes they had been wearing. Many of them died on the short trip, only a day or two after finally being freed. It was an image that he could see and describe clearly even after 50 years.

God and the war then changed his life again. He caught malaria in the Philippines, which disqualified him from his life long goal of becoming a missionary to China.

While he was still in seminary my Dad started his first church under a tree in a small town in Mississippi. It was the first of over 50 he started, most of which are still active and thriving.

My uncle, who was 13 years older, had become a pilot in the Army Air Corps in the late 1930s. He served throughout WWII and Korea and retired a Colonel in the Air Force.

21 posted on 08/15/2010 6:19:36 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: PROCON

http://vimeo.com/5645171

In case you guys didn’t see that video.

h/t to Iowahawk, where I found it


22 posted on 08/15/2010 6:21:02 PM PDT by Daisyjane69 (Michael Reagan: "Welcome back, Dad, even if you're wearing a dress and bearing children this time)
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To: PROCON
My father was a civil engineer in WWII and was stationed in Fairbanks, AK (among other assignments), helped supervise the building of the Alcan Hwy. My uncle was active duty but don't know where he served.

All his and my mom's letters back and forth were saved. My father wrote shortly before Hiroshima that they were looking at his being in active duty until 1948; i.e., 3 more years.

I've got a collection of letters, mostly sailors, from WWII. One served in the Mariana Islands, wrote that he never knew war could be so awful. I found him and called a few years back, had a good life after the war, said they ran a laundry and organized all the island's population to help. He wouldn't have knows the purpose of the airstrip being built just that something was going on and heavy earth moving equipment, think that got censored.

The above sailor wrote constantly about his girlfriend he'd left behind, made plans. It sustained him. I asked if he married her when he returned home. It turns out that he was Catholic and her father Orthodox and threatened to kill her if she married him. So he married another girl and had a happy marriage, lived in one of the nice suburbs of Chicago. Many of the letters had pieces cut out (censorship), and think they didn't need stamps, used the "franking privilege". Most were postmarked APO with the date and time like some still are now.

Another soldier it was interesting, served at the makeshift hospital in Yokohama which had been a school and where Tojo was brought after his suicide attempt, also the names on the mimeographed schedule for that time. I have a card adressed to Tojo as Your Imperial something enclosed with some fruit. The orderly asked if he could have the card, and Tojo nodded yes. Tojo refused to speak English but was polite. One American soldier gave a live transfusion to save Tojo's life. Then we know what happened to him a couple years later.

Most were routine, one wrote way before Pearl Harbor that he couldn't understand why they were painting the ship black and going out at night with the lights off. That was about May, so that tells me somebody expected something.

Another poignant one was from a poor sailor about to invade an island who was panicked, said some words to the effect that he never expected anything to do anything like that.

One common thread among the more mundane ones was so many were in sick bay with reactions to the vaccine(s) they'd been given.

23 posted on 08/15/2010 6:21:26 PM PDT by Aliska
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To: PROCON
One of my favorite customers was a member of the Ohio National Guard. Activated for service in WWII as part of the Buckeye Division (the 37th Infantry), he helped hold Hill 700 on Bougainville. He was gravely injured in the action, and was nominated for the Medal of Honor. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross on June 4th, 1944, and soon after, returned to his unit in time to help liberate the Phillipines.

I've known this modest man since 1994, and I only learned of his service when I was reading an archive copy of the June 4th, 1944 issue of The Toledo Blade and saw a story about his DSC. He was called, he served, and he came home to our little town to live out his life in peace, the peace he helped to restore.

These men were a breed apart.

24 posted on 08/15/2010 6:22:48 PM PDT by TonyInOhio ( Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils.)
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To: PROCON
I was able to attend a reunion of Battle of Midway survivors on the 55th anniversary of the battle aboard the USS Hornet at Alameda which, luckily for me, was open to the public.

Those guys were a breed apart - even in their old age they radiated strength & good humor. It was an honor to have met some of them.

25 posted on 08/15/2010 6:22:51 PM PDT by skeeter
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To: PROCON

My late Dad joined the 106th Illinois Cavalry as a buck Private in 1937, when they still had horses. Transferred to the Signal Corps when they took the horses away, got commissioned, transferred to the Engineers, wounded in North Africa, did the Sicily and Italy campaigns, and then up into France. Got chewed out by Patton one memorable time for wearing a knitted sweater in the headquarters area while attempting to scrounge from Third Army (he said that Patton’s face looked really big and really red from two inches away). Wounded again in Korea and retired a full Colonel after 33 years. Not bad for a little Illinois kid. I have a picture of him in breeches, boots, and a field jacket when he was home on his first leave. He was 17 and looks about 13. RIP, Dad.


26 posted on 08/15/2010 6:24:27 PM PDT by Billthedrill
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To: PROCON

My uncle (who was captain and QB of his college football team) was a Captain in the Army infantry, at one time involved in 53 straight days of combat in the Philippines. Didn’t talk about it much. He met future MLB pitcher Bobby Shantz in the service, and took me with him when he arranged to reunite with Bobby at a Pittsburgh Pirate game in 1961 (I think it was).


27 posted on 08/15/2010 6:26:09 PM PDT by steelyourfaith ("Release the Second Chakra !!!!!!!" ... Al Gore, 10/24/06)
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To: PROCON
My Dad served in the US Navy, Navigation Officer on the USS Arided (the sort of supply ship immortalized in Mr. Roberts).

Full story here:

freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/1749869/posts A Pacific WWII Navy Veteran's memories

28 posted on 08/15/2010 6:26:38 PM PDT by lightman (Adjutorium nostrum (+) in nomine Domini)
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To: PROCON
My Mom was a WAAC for a several month period in World War II.....she'd joined up and gone off pending Dad's induction.

Turns out he was diagnosed with tuberculosis during his induction physicals, so "in the day" she was discharged to care for him in the called-for isolation recuperation.

Footnote - I'm on the cusp this coming week of losing Dad three years ago, and Mom a year and a half later (to the day).

After Mom's death, we discovered some letters she'd saved from her WAAC buddies....one of which told her about a brother who's gone missing on Bataan - she'd just gotten a letter from the Red Cross that he was captured.....this lady - even at that time - felt that her brother might have been better off KIA given the suspected (at that time), and later proven, Japanese butchery.

29 posted on 08/15/2010 6:27:08 PM PDT by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: PROCON

Sorry I put my post in twice. I guess people my age should always be supervised when using a computer.


30 posted on 08/15/2010 6:27:25 PM PDT by Retain Mike
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To: PROCON

My dad was on the USS Marblehead in the Pacific and later as she was in the North Atlantic and supporting the invasion of France.

>”Whenever daring deeds of the sea are recalled, the saga of the U.S.S. Marblehead commands respect. Mauled by Japanese bombs just after the U.S. entry into World War ll, the ship was saved by her crew and — after a 9,000-mile voyage to safety and a complete refit — returned to the fight. At a time when many mightier warships were left rusting among the Pacific corals, the Marblehead was saved by courageous leadership, desperate toil, and good fortune.

The crew’s exploits were well-known because President Franklin D. Roosevelt had singled them out as the subject of one of his fireside chats. In holding up the Marblehead’s men and those of the Houston (now sunk, fighting to the last shell together with the Australian cruiser Perth) as an inspiration to their countrymen, F.D.R. chose well. In that dark hour their determination, courage, and self-sacrifice shone with extra luster, providing genuine heroes for America.

The bells of Abbot Hall pealed the news to the Town; in time the ship’s bell came to rest in Abbot Hall, but in the meantime the ship which bore the Town’s name had rendered useful service to her country. She emerged from Brooklyn Navy Yard in October 1942, modernized throughout, to patrol the sea lanes off Brazil. Later she escorted North Atlantic convoys and supported the invasion of France, earning two battle stars before being decommissioned in 1945. These three years of outstanding service were made possible by the skill and determination of her indomitable 1942 crew — ordinary men who, impelled by extraordinary circumstances, overcame their limitations and worked as a team to save their ship, regardless of personal risk, dedicated to a common cause.”<


31 posted on 08/15/2010 6:27:30 PM PDT by ansel12
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To: PROCON

My dad was in the invasion force (Army) of Japan when the bomb was dropped, and served in the occupation in Yokohama. Without the bomb, he’d likely have been an invasion casualty. He wore a cross (Episcopal) that I wore during Vietnam that my son now wears in the USMC. We hope it’s a lucky one.


32 posted on 08/15/2010 6:28:42 PM PDT by Spok (Free Range Republican)
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To: Spok
He wore a cross (Episcopal) that I wore during Vietnam that my son now wears in the USMC. We hope it’s a lucky one.

Seems to be, so far!..:=)

Thanks for your Service!!

Sheesh, I was in Nam too, so long, long ago!

33 posted on 08/15/2010 6:31:44 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: centurion316

My dad was a Philippine Scout [a branch of the U.S Army under USAFFE (United States Armed Forces in the Far East] during WWII), fought in Bataan, escaped the Death March and became a guerilla under an American commander.


34 posted on 08/15/2010 6:31:45 PM PDT by Ben Reyes (Palin for President 2012)
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To: PROCON

My mother’s boyfriend, now passed on, was torpedoed twice in the Atlantic. He was a navy radioman. He didn’t tell the stories too often but when he did, they were thrilling.

The one I always remember was that when they were in rough seas, the cook would come along and pour water on all the tables. The wet tablecloths kept the dishes from sliding.

Don’t know why that one sticks with me but it takes me to the moment and what it must have been like.


35 posted on 08/15/2010 6:33:29 PM PDT by cotton1706
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To: PROCON

My dad is now 84 yrs young (he still bowls in a league every week) and served in the Navy. He was part of the top secret Project Ivory Soap.....

http://www.usmm.org/felknorivory.html

He served on Aircraft Repair Ship Brig. Gen. Alfred J. Lyon (original name was the Nathaniel Scudder). He was a Gunner’s Mate and boarded the craft in New Orleans. They were stationed in the Phillipines for a time.

Dad’s younger brother also served in the Navy during WWII but I don’t know what he did.

3 of my mom’s 4 brothers served in WWII also. All Navy I believe. Her youngest brother joined the Navy towards the end of the war and served for 4 yrs. When he was discharged he joined the Army and became some sort of a special investigations officer.


36 posted on 08/15/2010 6:34:54 PM PDT by abigailsmybaby ( I'm not going to buy my kids an encyclopedia. Let them walk to school like I did. Yogi Berra)
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To: PROCON

My Dad enlisted in 1936 and was at Hickham Field when it was attacked on Dec 7th. Fought through Guadacanel and then in Borneo. Was promoted up through E7 (senior enlisted at the time) and then got a direct commission. Was stationed in Australia when the war ended.

My favorite story of his was that when he walked down his troopship’s gangway in Oakland, he was carrying golf clubs and a tennis racket. He said a marine guard remarked, “Rough war, uh Captain?”

He stayed in until he retired a full Colonel. Every grade from E1 to O6. Quite the ride.


37 posted on 08/15/2010 6:35:04 PM PDT by Dogfaced Soldier
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To: skeeter
In the early 90’s a submarine I served on stopped in Fort Lauderdale while undergoing a shakedown cruise. There was reunion of WWII submariners in town and we took them out for a cruise. I was standing up topside with a few friends while they were coming aboard.

One old guy looked at us with a twinkle in his eye and asked “Hey, you guys feeling lucky?”

“Sure,” we replied. “Why?”

“Because the last three boats I went out to sea on were sank out from underneath me.”

At that point a bunch of dumb 20-somethings grew up a little. We realized we were in the presence of heroes.

38 posted on 08/15/2010 6:35:37 PM PDT by Pan_Yan
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To: duckworth
My dad, whose funeral was a year ago today,

May he rest in peace....we're approaching what would have been my Pop's 97th early next week, and then the third anniversary of his death very shortly thereafter.

39 posted on 08/15/2010 6:35:40 PM PDT by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: Spok

Same here. I remember my dad saying they were already issuing winter uniforms for the Japanese invasion when the bomb was dropped. He was glad it ended the war. I am too—I might not be here!


40 posted on 08/15/2010 6:37:33 PM PDT by Fu-fu2
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To: dennisw
My father was in the army and was a diesel mechanic for the supply trains. His unit served under General Patton when he stormed across France. Later on he was sent to Aroostook county (potatoes land and very cold) Maine to serve as a guard in a German POW camp.

...and lest anyone might forget, your Dad was just as much an integral part of the effort as the 0311 on the front line.

41 posted on 08/15/2010 6:39:47 PM PDT by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: PROCON

My Grandfather was a Military Engineer in the Heer. He spent most of the war with Army Group North around Leningrad, and was posted for some time with the Finns.

He survived the Great Retreat, Narva, Courland, and was later captured in the West as a Staff officer in a Volksgrenadier Regiment in the Courland Pocket, from where he was sent to a P.O.W. camp in Maine.

His two brothers (both cobblers) had fled Germany (and the Gestapo) in 1936, and settled with the German Catholic Community in Southeast Indiana. One later served as an Interpreter at the Camp Atterbury POW Camp.

My grandfather met the threshold of having a critical skill, and with family already here, was granted residency in 1946, and immediately brought his wife, and my father here.

He donated his papers to the Smithsonian shortly before he died in 1980, and a bit of personal films were used in the PBS series, “WW2”


42 posted on 08/15/2010 6:40:16 PM PDT by tcrlaf (Obama White House=Tammany Hall on the National Mall)
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To: Dogfaced Soldier
Every grade from E1 to O6. Quite the ride.

The finest officers I served under were all prior enlisted!

Good at him!

43 posted on 08/15/2010 6:40:22 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: Daisyjane69
In case you guys didn’t see that video.

I picked that up here on FR a few months ago....outstanding.

44 posted on 08/15/2010 6:41:55 PM PDT by ErnBatavia (It's not the Obama Administration....it's the "Obama Regime".)
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To: ErnBatavia
and then the third anniversary of his death very shortly thereafter.

I know FRiend, the Greatest Generation

My Dad's been gone for 22 years and I can still see his face..:=(

45 posted on 08/15/2010 6:42:35 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: PROCON

My father was a sergeant in the U.S. Army and served as a tank driver in New Guinea and the Philippines. He was stationed in Japan at the end of the War. He is now in a nursing home. His mind is good, and he dwells on WWII a lot. God bless him and those who served this country well.


46 posted on 08/15/2010 6:43:07 PM PDT by Library Lady
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To: PROCON

My Great Uncle was a Marine and went from Guadalcanal to Okinawa. He got shot in the stomach with a wooden bullet on Okinawa and spent a great deal of time in recovery. He was the last war injury to leave the San Diego Naval Hospital.

While he was training with LVTs in Australia, he witnessed a Japanese submarine engaging a merchant ship with gunfire just off the coast at night. Being the senior man on hand (enlisted) he immediately headed to rescue the merchant sailors and engaged the Jap sub with the LVT’s guns. He was awarded a Bronze or Silver Star for heroism (I’m sad to say, I don’t know which).


47 posted on 08/15/2010 6:43:09 PM PDT by SampleMan (If all of the people currently oppressed shared a common geography, bullets would already be flying.)
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To: PROCON
Just on the Pacific War my mother's brother, the only one in a family of 10, served at Pelau and other Pacific Islands in the US Army Infantry. One of the sister's had a fiance killed in action.

My uncle didn't talk about it much. I've heard about it from others.

My wife's father served in China with Stillwell. He had quite a bit to do with evacuating the surrendering Japanese from the mainland.

One of my mother-in-law's brothers received a Silver Star for service in the Battle of Monte Casino. The other served in Army Intelligence and was among the first people to land at the surrender.

Her aunt's husband ran the Army language program at Fort Snelling.

My own father was flying crew chief on what was the predecessor to what became Air Force One ~ out of Bolling Field with First Squadron.

This was a necessary taxi service for the Allied High Command and their General Grade Officers.

If Roosevelt had ever flown a plane he'd flown with my father.

One of my father's brothers appear with some frequency in several documentaries about Infantry in North Africa, Sicily and Italy where he was wounded.

The other brother served toward the end of the war after spending a couple of years building muscle so he was eligible to serve, and I'll tell you that's something you don't often see these days, or even then.

So, that's it in brief. On my father's side 3 eligible, 3 served. On my mother's side, 1 eligible, 1 served, and a fiance dead. On my father in law's side, 2 eligible, 1 served and on my mother in law's side, 2 eligible, 2 served.

From the time my wife or I took our first steps we walked among heroes.

48 posted on 08/15/2010 6:43:33 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: Dogfaced Soldier
"My favorite story of his was that when he walked down his troopship’s gangway in Oakland, he was carrying golf clubs and a tennis racket. He said a marine guard remarked, “Rough war, uh Captain?”"

Great story...sounds like a Bill Mauldin cartoon :-)

49 posted on 08/15/2010 6:44:54 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Que me amat, amet et canem meum)
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To: PROCON

My dad and all of my uncles served with the exception of one or two who were too young. My dad would NEVER talk about it, but one uncle told me pops was right in the thick of it. Dad was in the Navy and spent all of his time in the Pacific. One uncle served with the 3rd Armored Division and was killed in his tank near Cherbourg, June 29, 1944.

Someone (might have been the VFW?) published a book after the war that listed all of the local servicemen and their war stories, all glossy pages and laid out sort of like a yearbook, with a paragraph or two for each man, telling of his experiences. The really heroic or hair-raising ones got more space. Hundreds and hundreds of stories, with pictures. I used to love browsing through it when I was a kid... Just open to a random page and start reading. Don’t know what happened to that book. Would love to get my hands on a copy today!


50 posted on 08/15/2010 6:48:03 PM PDT by LibWhacker (America awake!)
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