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VJ Day Open Thread: My Father Served in World War II(Tell Your Story)
bigjournalism.com ^ | Aug. 15, 2010 | Frank Ross

Posted on 08/15/2010 5:59:12 PM PDT by PROCON

Today is the 65th Anniversary of VJ Day, or Victory over Japan Day.

Did your Dad or other relatives serve against Japan in WWII?

(Excerpt) Read more at bigjournalism.com ...


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: vetscor; vetscorner; ww2; wwii
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To: MissP-38
These heros won’t be with us too much longer. They need to tell their stories. I am proud to have had a P-38 named for me! Sure glad he didn’t drive a tank.

No they won't!..:=(

Thanks for sharing!

61 posted on 08/15/2010 6:59:44 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: PROCON

My father was an electrician in the Navy - on a ship near Okinawa.

He never talked about his service.


62 posted on 08/15/2010 7:00:33 PM PDT by colorcountry ("The power of facts is much greater than the power of argument.")
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To: jesseam
asked him what the atomic bomb looked like and he drew an outline of Fatman but seconds later he destroyed the drawing.

Interesting, classified material, I suppose.

Thanks for sharing!

63 posted on 08/15/2010 7:03:04 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: tcrlaf

I had to read the first line twice before it sank in.

Guess I was expecting all the ‘relatives’ to have fought for the Allies. LOL!


64 posted on 08/15/2010 7:04:16 PM PDT by 11Bush
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To: PROCON

That was the only time that I knew of where security was broken.


65 posted on 08/15/2010 7:09:15 PM PDT by jesseam (Been there, done that)
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To: Amberdawn
Uncle Bobby...

Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division.

Place and date: On Iwo Jima, Volcano Islands, 20 and 21 February 1945. Entered service at: Illinois. Born: 19 October 1920, Abingdon, Ill.

Citation: For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as commanding officer of Company C, 1st Battalion, 26th Marines, 5th Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the seizure of Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands on 20 and 21 February, 1945.

Defying uninterrupted blasts of Japanese artillery, mortar, rifle and machine gun fire, Capt. Dunlap led his troops in a determined advance from low ground uphill toward the steep cliffs from which the enemy poured a devastating rain of shrapnel and bullets, steadily inching forward until the tremendous volume of enemy fire from the caves located high to his front temporarily halted his progress.

Determined not to yield, he crawled alone approximately 200 yards forward of his front lines, took observation at the base of the cliff 50 yards from Japanese lines, located the enemy gun positions and returned to his own lines where he relayed the vital information to supporting artillery and naval gunfire units.

Persistently disregarding his own personal safety, he then placed himself in an exposed vantage point to direct more accurateIy the supporting fire and, working without respite for 2 days and 2 nights under constant enemy fire, skillfully directed a smashing bombardment against the almost impregnable Japanese positions despite numerous obstacles and heavy Marine casualties.

A brilliant leader, Capt. Dunlap inspired his men to heroic efforts during this critical phase of the battle and by his cool decision, indomitable fighting spirit and daring tactics in the face of fanatic opposition greatIy accelerated the final decisive defeat of Japanese countermeasures in his sector and materially furthered the continued advance of his company.

His great personal valor and gallant spirit of self-sacrifice throughout the bitter hostilities reflect the highest credit upon Capt Dunlap and the U.S. Naval Service.

66 posted on 08/15/2010 7:09:50 PM PDT by Pure Country (“I’ve noticed that every person that is for abortion has already been born.” -Ronald Reagan)
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To: PROCON

My Dad was an Aviation Machinists Mate,I was just a twinkle in his eye in 1945.


67 posted on 08/15/2010 7:10:50 PM PDT by mdittmar (i)
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To: PROCON

Dad flew TBM Avengers and PBY Catalinas for the Navy. Never really talked about it, just said it was something he had to do.

He did tell me the story about coming home on leave and flying my mother under the Kanawah River bridge in Charleston, WV. She never got in a plane that he had control of again.

He has been gone three years now, and I will never forget his quiet courage he displayed all through his life. God Bless you Dad.


68 posted on 08/15/2010 7:11:49 PM PDT by 11Bush
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To: PROCON
Great Thread.

My FIl was navy first then army.

Explosion in the Aleutians got him a steel plate in the head and a medical discharge prior to Dec 7th.

After Dec 7th he enlisted in the Army.

Battle of the Bulge. Silver Star , I think at Bastogne.

Several Purple hearts.

69 posted on 08/15/2010 7:12:37 PM PDT by TASMANIANRED (Liberals are educated above their level of intelligence.. Thanks Sr. Angelica)
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To: PROCON

It saved the lives of many Japanese, too.

Had we not taken out those TWO MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL CITIES, we would have had to kill far more Japanese by conventional methods in order to convince the Japanese to surrender. Once they saw that we multiple atomic bombs, they realized they couldn’t beat us.

And a weapon of that monstrous destruction enabled them to “save face” upon surrendering, as they could blame it on that bomb and not having lost the battles/war.


70 posted on 08/15/2010 7:12:37 PM PDT by Ghost of Philip Marlowe (Prepare for survival.)
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To: PROCON

I’ll second that.


71 posted on 08/15/2010 7:12:50 PM PDT by Mouton
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To: PROCON

My father was in the SeaBees. He joined the Navy in early ‘42 and as he was very knowledgeable about explosives he ended up teaching demolition in Norfolk for most of the war. He was in California, due to ship out for the invasion of Japan in two days when the first bomb was dropped. He said they were told to stand by and await further word. The next he heard the war was over.


72 posted on 08/15/2010 7:13:08 PM PDT by engrpat (A village in Kenya is missing their idiot...lets send him back)
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To: jesseam
That was the only time that I knew of where security was broken.

No prob, FRiend, not judging!

Your Dad was just answering your question.

73 posted on 08/15/2010 7:14:13 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: PROCON

My Dad, who has been gone for 5 years told me of him being in the engine room of his ship during the Battle of Saipan and waiting for the Kamikaze’s to hit his ship.


74 posted on 08/15/2010 7:17:22 PM PDT by garybob (More sweat in training, less blood in combat.)
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To: jesseam
Your Dad was just answering your question

Who, IMHO is a hero, as are you!

Thank you for your Service to Our Country!

75 posted on 08/15/2010 7:20:02 PM PDT by PROCON (Independence Day + 42, Let's see how long it lasts!)
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To: 11Bush; tcrlaf
A little note on the German-American experience ~ notice that tcrlaf's uncles had lived in Southwestern, Indiana. They were far from alone ~ many areas there were already 90% German ancestry. Even Indianapolis and the state of Indiana on the average come in at 43%.

Popular belief is that Indiana draftees tended to get rotated to the Pacific War for that reason. Some small towns like Seymour had hundreds of men sent to the Pacific, and the European Theatre veterans were few and far between.

It's difficult to tell at this late date.

Regarding his uncle who interpreted for Camp Atterbury, he was undoubtedly there when the POWs rioted over being served "cake" every day. That was resolved easily when it was found (through the hard work of the translators) that they wanted rough brown bread ~ American white bread being too much like pastry to them.

The camp command put out requests to the German-American churches in Southern Indiana (gazillions of them) for German bread.

The riots stopped.

The command also put an end to housing Nazis with the enlisted personnel since they were finding reasons to stir them up.

My sister in law's father was sent to Germany in the Infantry. He appears in some combat films made during the war where the American troops and the Germans both encounter a dead cow which they then agree to butcher separately and avoid shooting at each other. Her dad spoke German and did a good job working this out.

PBS owns that material.

76 posted on 08/15/2010 7:21:00 PM PDT by muawiyah
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To: PROCON
My dad served in the Coast Guard during WWII. In the earlier part of the war he was stationed for a while in Oregon where he and some of his buddies saw a plane go down off the coast near Haystack Rock and went out and rescued the crew. I didn't hear anything about this rescue until a few years ago when he went back out to Oregon for some kind of program recognizing him and the others and a reunion between all those involved.

After that he was stationed on Palawan and Mindanao in the Philippines for the later part of the war. His brother was in the Navy in the Pacific. He had been turned down because of some medical condition when he was 17 and paid for his own surgery to have it corrected so he could join. His ship was sunk but he survived. I still remember looking through his chests stored at my grandparents house and seeing grass skirts and other stuff. My dad brought back all sorts of weird knives from the Philippines.

I also knew a man in our church who was in the Navy at Pearl Harbor on that day of infamy. He said he was below decks when the attack started and upon hearing the noise came up top to see a Japanese plane flying right alongside his ship. He said the pilot was looking at him and grinning.


77 posted on 08/15/2010 7:21:27 PM PDT by aruanan
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To: PROCON

My Father who died in July 2008, served in the combat engineers. They landed in Normandy but fortunately for them, a few days after D-Day.

They made their way across Europe through Holland, Belgium, France, and Germany. They were in occasional combat, even sharp at times but mostly were building roads, bridges etc. until the final 3 months of the war. from then to the end they were right in the thick of it.

I have their official Army history. It is interesting and a couple of things stood out to me. First of all their officers (who my Father described as fine Christian men) were real engineers, not some yahoos out building things.

The most impressive thing to me was how fast the got things done. For instance the history would have an entry such as: Company A and C assigned to build a railway trestle across some river. A few days later there would be another entry. RR trestle complete, Company A assigned to repair road damaged by artillery fire, Company B and C assigned to clear mine field. Each time the job would be done very quickly and they would immediately be given another.

They put several pontoon and other types across various rivers including the Rhine and Elbe. The one across the Rhine was under continuous artillery fire.


78 posted on 08/15/2010 7:23:24 PM PDT by yarddog
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To: garybob

My dad was a line chief for B-17s...he passed in 85.

My uncle is 88, he was in PBYs and PBMs in the pacific and mentions he was in a black cat squadron. When we A bombed those cities, he was stationed in Korea and said he was delighted the war ended not long after.

My great uncle was awarded the silver star for action in and around Bastogne. I don’t know more about his service than that as he died long ago (in a mugging).


79 posted on 08/15/2010 7:23:54 PM PDT by Mouton
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To: PROCON
One of my BiL's saw Navy duty in the South Pacific. All I know about his service is it made a alcoholic out of him. Here is a interesting local angle to the signing os the surrender papers on the USS Missouri... Admiral Bull Halsey...
80 posted on 08/15/2010 7:25:04 PM PDT by tubebender (Life is short so drink the good wine first...)
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