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Plumes of Gulf Oil Spreading East on Sea Floor
CNN ^ | August 17, 2010 | Staff

Posted on 08/17/2010 2:35:04 AM PDT by lbryce

A new report set to be released Tuesday renews concerns about the long-term environmental impact of the Gulf Coast oil disaster, and efforts to permanently plug the ruptured BP oil well have been delayed again.

Researchers at the University of South Florida have concluded that oil from the Deepwater Horizon spill may have settled to the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico further east than previously suspected -- and at levels toxic to marine life.

Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor, where it has turned up at the bottom of an undersea canyon within 40 miles of the Florida Panhandle. The results are scheduled to be released Tuesday, but CNN obtained a summary of the initial conclusions Monday night.

Plankton and other organisms at the base of the food chain showed a "strong toxic response" to the crude, and the oil could well up onto the continental shelf and resurface later, according to researchers.

"The dispersant is moving the oil down out of the surface and into the deeper waters, where it can affect phytoplankton and other marine life," said John Paul, a marine microbiologist at USF.

The spill erupted April 20 with an explosion that sank the offshore drilling platform Deepwater Horizon. The blast killed 11 men and uncapped an undersea gusher that spewed an estimated 205 million gallons of oil into the Gulf before it was temporarily shut on July 15.

Retired Coast Guard Adm. Thad Allen, the federal government's point man in the Gulf, said Monday that attempts to permanently seal the well won't start until the latest potential problem is evaluated.

(Excerpt) Read more at cnn.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Extended News; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: bp; libmyths; oil; oildisaster; oilspill
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What??? Whadd'ya mean?? Uh, uh. But it was al so neat, so perfect, so fairy-tale ending, the image of Barack and Michelle silhouetted against the setting sun over the gulf was, was, how it should have been, They said it was all gone, poof!, evaporated, disappeared into thin air,vanished down that same rabbit hole of surreality from whence Mr. Obama and his dream presidency originally crawled out of. No! No! He's got the gift. He can indeed make it all disappear if he wanted to. This is all GOP propaganda. There is no oil anywhere in the gulf.
1 posted on 08/17/2010 2:35:08 AM PDT by lbryce
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To: lbryce

Better yet, these researchers say it “might” be so. Obviously, their solution is more money to “study” their thoery. Most likely some pointy headed dolt who knows nothing of the Gulf waters and the area around it.

From my earliest days of living in this state, we have always experienced the occasional tar balls on all of the beaches in Florida. These dolts have no concept that oil leaks through to the ocean floor every day all over the world and that more oil is “vented” to the oceans in a year than the entire Deep Horizon episode.

Maybe they should go out to LA and “study” the tar pits they can walk right up to. They might learn something truly stunning considering their mindset in that there were no oil drilling rigs that brought this oil to the surface.


2 posted on 08/17/2010 2:46:40 AM PDT by mazda77 (Rubio for US Senate - West FL22nd - Hayworth for US Senate - Scott for FL Gov.)
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To: mazda77

Your post is full of crap.

Native born retired longline Captain.


3 posted on 08/17/2010 3:16:22 AM PDT by KDD (When the government boot is on your neck, it matters not whether it is the right boot or the left.)
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To: lbryce

More like spin to cover Obamao on the deep water drilling ban.


4 posted on 08/17/2010 3:21:47 AM PDT by Carley (For those who fought for it, freedom has a flavor the protected will never know.)
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To: lbryce; mazda77
This was reported a few months ago,,,

The Dead Pelican.com has covered this for a long time,,,

The plume is about 6 miles wide and 10 miles long and

about 600 feet deep IIRC,,,

BP squirted that Corexit at the blowout to keep the oil

on the bottom so the fine they will have to pay will

be less when all this mess goes to court,,,

Eat Gulf seafood at your own risk!...

5 posted on 08/17/2010 3:43:05 AM PDT by 1COUNTER-MORTER-68 (THROWING ANOTHER BULLET-RIDDLED TV IN THE PILE OUT BACK~~~~~)
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To: lbryce; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Maybe, maybe not. Where there are phytoplankton, there are bacteria. Oil is food for the latter. If it is an emulsion, the surface area is large. They might just be able to stir that mixture and feed oxygen to those bugs by injecting air. That way, the canyon becomes a handy mixing vessel.
6 posted on 08/17/2010 3:47:07 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (Islam offers three choices: surrender, fight, or die.)
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To: KDD

Opinions are fantastic things, you are entitled to yours and I to mine.

“Science is a wonderful thing if one does not have to earn one’s living at it.” Albert Einstein


7 posted on 08/17/2010 3:48:19 AM PDT by mazda77 (Rubio for US Senate - West FL22nd - Hayworth for US Senate - Scott for FL Gov.)
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To: lbryce
initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor

Remind me again who it was that ordered BP to use dispersants.

8 posted on 08/17/2010 3:49:38 AM PDT by Hoodat (.For the weapons of our warfare are mighty in God for pulling down strongholds.)
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To: mazda77

Crude oil contains both light and heavy fractions. The oil heavier than 7 API will sink and collect on the bottom.


9 posted on 08/17/2010 3:51:00 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Impeachment !)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

re: post #6


10 posted on 08/17/2010 3:52:51 AM PDT by mazda77 (Rubio for US Senate - West FL22nd - Hayworth for US Senate - Scott for FL Gov.)
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To: lbryce

Oil floats. Who writes, reads, or believes this shit? Seriously, any on FR who believe in this shitty science should just go to DU instead cause you’re much too stupid to be a conservative.


11 posted on 08/17/2010 3:52:57 AM PDT by packrat35 (I got your tag line..)
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To: KDD; mazda77
As another poster on this thread noted, oil floats.

What we are seeing here IMO is the hard-left enviro movement trying to get support for an offshore drilling moratorium by saying, "Don't believe your lying eyes, forget the reports from the field that the oil is largely gone, this is far worse, we know it, we just can't prove it, so support a drilling ban!"

Pretty transparent to me. Heck, they were running ads for it last night on cable on a critter show I was watching.

12 posted on 08/17/2010 3:59:31 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

This oil was pretty light overall. And the Gulf is a huge body of warm water with microbes that actively eat oil seeps, as opposed to Prince Edward Sound, a restricted and cold body of water. It can absorb and consume this oil.


13 posted on 08/17/2010 4:01:21 AM PDT by dirtboy
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To: packrat35

14 posted on 08/17/2010 4:02:02 AM PDT by lbryce (Obama Notwithstanding, America's Best Days Are Yet To Be .)
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To: lbryce
Put some oil, any oil in a bucket of water and see how long it takes to sink to the bottom.

...report back.

15 posted on 08/17/2010 4:04:18 AM PDT by TexasCajun
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To: dirtboy

It can be light crude, yet still contain heavy molecules.
My specialty for the past 25 years has been the heavy fractions many of which are heavier than water.
If oil is 10 API or lighter, it will float in fresh water.
If oil is 7 API or heavier, it will sink in salt water.


16 posted on 08/17/2010 4:07:24 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Impeachment !)
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To: lbryce
Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor, where it has turned up at the bottom of an undersea canyon

I told ya' so. I said this would happen many weeks ago. I was poo-pooed and called scientifically illiterate.

I said this would eventually become an international incident with oil washing up on shores throughout the Caribbean and even the EASTERN seaboard, as the underwater slick reaches the Gulf and begins to flow into the Gulf Stream. By Spring of 2011 this oil spill that 0bama failed to contain will be an international scourge on America.

I should have bookmarked that thread or linked it to my profile.

The Gulf Stream System originates in the tropical North Atlantic, born of two other currents. One current, known as the North Equatorial Current, moves east of the Bahamas. The other moves through the Caribbean Sea, travels through the Gulf of Mexico as the Loop Current, and then speeds up in the Straits of Florida. When the two parts join, this western boundary current, the Gulf Stream, travels north along the coast of the southeaster United States. The Gulf Stream veers off the North American continent near Cape Hatteras and travels across the Atlantic Ocean.


17 posted on 08/17/2010 4:14:10 AM PDT by EBH (Our First Right...."it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it,")
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To: lbryce
Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor

Yep, got to keep all that grant money flowing out of the Treasury to fund these useless "eviromental studies" departments at various Universities so it time for a new chicken little report about possible hints of a rumor of a new catastrophe that may be happening.

Total BS manufactured by "academic" con men looking for a new con.

18 posted on 08/17/2010 4:16:22 AM PDT by MNJohnnie (The problem with Socialism is eventually you run our of other peoples money. Lady Thatcher)
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To: dirtboy
I don't trust the hard-left enviro movement or BP.

The USF study is not government funded.

I have worked next to those guys offshore as well as with scientists from Mote Marine Laboratory in Pinellas county and they are not slackers. And we do not see tar balls washing up on our coasts in W-SW Florida. Maybe in the Panhandle..I don't get to those Beach's often.

But it's best to wait and see what transpires...To be wrong about the possible damage and blindly go headlong into the same activities that caused this disaster without all the information in is simply foolish. Prudence is dictated.

19 posted on 08/17/2010 4:36:27 AM PDT by KDD (When the government boot is on your neck, it matters not whether it is the right boot or the left.)
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To: lbryce

This article is 100% PURE CRAP.
The entire Gulf has oil seepage everywhere. It is natural.
I live along the coast of Lake Erie. Some years back, after a really heavy rain, we noticed bubbles coming from cracks in the blacktop of our parking lot at work. Talk and discussion among the employees all year finally resulted in our company drilling a shallow gas well in the parking lot. The well resulted in never having a fuel bill again. Oil and gas seepage is a completely natural thing that nature just does.
I’d be astonished if oil or methane wasn’t coming from the Gulf floor. It’s the and has been for thousands of years.
This is just another attempt by liberals and their yellow press to run around yelling, “The sky is falling.”


20 posted on 08/17/2010 4:39:09 AM PDT by BuffaloJack (Obama, the Criminal, is BAD for AMERICA.)
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To: lbryce

Cheers erupt from radical environmentalists everywhere.


21 posted on 08/17/2010 4:40:01 AM PDT by comps4spice (Why are they fumigating the White House?)
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To: Eric in the Ozarks

Eric, with your experience, if anybody should know anything about this it would apparently be you. I live on the Gulf Coast and I’d like to know the facts. I read somewhere that up to 40% of this type crude was comprised of the more volatile fractions and evaporated within days of reaching the surface. The heavier fractions make up what percentage of this type crude?


22 posted on 08/17/2010 4:40:49 AM PDT by 762X51
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To: KDD

How so? Are you saying there is NO natural seepage of oil into the oceans?

If that is the case you would be very wrong, “Captain”.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2000/01/000127082228.htm

http://www.whoi.edu/oceanus/viewArticle.do?id=57272


23 posted on 08/17/2010 4:41:08 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: lbryce
Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor,

It would be nice if they'd tell us what sort of evidence this may is based upon, if there is any concrete evidence, or only a theory.

24 posted on 08/17/2010 4:43:11 AM PDT by Will88
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To: KDD

I rest my case, counselor, I mean Captain.


25 posted on 08/17/2010 4:53:58 AM PDT by mazda77 (Rubio for US Senate - West FL22nd - Hayworth for US Senate - Scott for FL Gov.)
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To: 101voodoo

Get me the GPS numbers of these oil “seeps” in the East GOM and I’ll go out and take a look and see what the bottom looks like there and if there are any oil slicks around. I imagine these seeps might resemble the springs I see on the bottom that seem to attract the Gag grouper in large numbers.

In fact...I’ve looked at the bottom of the Gulf for the most part 25 years and have never seen a seep or an unexplained oil sheen on top of the water anywhere.

The rest of the time I longlined the top water fish.


26 posted on 08/17/2010 4:55:23 AM PDT by KDD (When the government boot is on your neck, it matters not whether it is the right boot or the left.)
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To: 762X51
Not sure of the percentage but every crude stream (with the exception of the syncrude, which has been processed to remove the asphaltines, etc) has some “bottoms.”
From my experience, the more oil is agitated, the quicker the light fractions evaporate and the heavier portions “glom” together.
Some years ago, a barge of 13 API asphalt from Whiting sank on the lower Mississippi. It was estimated that less than 20 percent hit the surface.
27 posted on 08/17/2010 5:05:27 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (Impeachment !)
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To: lbryce

Let me see if I understand the physics of this...You mix dispersants, which float on water, with oil, which floats on water, and the result sinks in water?


28 posted on 08/17/2010 5:07:27 AM PDT by norwaypinesavage (Galileo: In science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of one individual)
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To: lbryce
No, your post is eco-green-socialist propaganda. There is not a single QUANTITATIVE reference in the whole article. What is the CONCENTRATION of oil in these "plumes"?? Highest number I've ever seen is 5 parts per million, and that was weeks ago. Much more dilution, degradation, and natural bacterial remediation has happened since then.

The eco-alarmists have been trying to sell this BS ever since the spill started.

29 posted on 08/17/2010 5:24:12 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: lbryce

Consider the source.


30 posted on 08/17/2010 5:25:23 AM PDT by RoadTest (Religion is a substitute for the relationship God wants with you.)
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To: EBH
I was poo-pooed and called scientifically illiterate."

I'd say that if you believe this, the above shoe fits quite well.

31 posted on 08/17/2010 5:25:27 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: KDD

I supplied you with links to what appear to be legitimate sources of info regarding natural seepage. There are literally dozens more if you google “natural oil seepage into the oceans”

That’s enough for me but if you want or need GPS coordinates then I suggest you contact these sources.


32 posted on 08/17/2010 5:27:31 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: KDD
"The USF study is not government funded."

Where do you think their grant money comes from??? There is a clique at USF that has been glooming and dooming ever since the spill happened.

Without concentration numbers, the posted article is meaningless. "...at a level toxic to marine live..." just doesn't cut it. WHAT marine life?? There is a very great diversity of marine life, that can be affected by different concentrations of oil. The highest number that I have seen for oil in such "plumes" is 5 ppm, which can possibly kill some larval species, but won't affect more mature individuals of the same species.

33 posted on 08/17/2010 5:35:19 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: KDD; mazda77
KDD, I don't what you're objecting to here. It's a fact that we constantly, over decades have had an issue with oil and tar balls on Florida beaches along the East Coast. My folks beach front condo used to keep bottles of baby oil at the edge of the boardwalk so we could use it to clean our feet should we step in some. That was a common site all over the place. This is going back for decades.

We're not talking Exxon/Valdeez quantities, just spots here and there.

34 posted on 08/17/2010 5:35:57 AM PDT by Caipirabob ( Communists... Socialists... Democrats...Traitors... Who can tell the difference?)
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To: lbryce

Does anyone know:

What’s the half life of these dispersants that were used? What happens to the crude when they become ineffective? Does it rise again or stay on the bottom?


35 posted on 08/17/2010 5:51:59 AM PDT by deport
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To: lbryce

If this is true it’s Obama’s fault for not having planned for it.


36 posted on 08/17/2010 6:07:47 AM PDT by Mike Darancette (Socialism is the philosophy of failure, - W Churchill)
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To: lbryce
Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor, where it has turned up at the bottom of an undersea canyon within 40 miles of the Florida Panhandle.

On May 28, the White House was boasting about how many gallons of dispersants had already been deployed.

On July 15, the EPA testified before Congress that they had given their blessing to the "novel" use of dispersants at the leak source.

The application of dispersant is part of a broader environmental triage approach to minimize the known threat to the environment to the greatest extent possible. The spill management strategies, practices, and technologies currently being implemented include mechanical removal techniques (use of sorbents, booming and skimming operations), in-situ burning, and lastly dispersants. There are environmental tradeoffs and uncertainties associated with the widespread use of large quantities of dispersants. We know dispersants are generally less toxic than the oils they break down. We know that surface use of dispersants decreases the environmental risks to shorelines and organisms at the surface and when used this way, dispersants break down over several days to weeks. In addition, the use of dispersants at the source of the leak represents a novel approach to addressing the significant environmental threat posed by the spill. Results to date indicate that subsea use of the dispersant is effective at reducing the amount of oil reaching the surface, and can do so by using less dispersant than is needed to disperse oil after it reaches the surface, and has resulted in significant reductions in the overall quantity of dispersants being used to minimize impacts in the deepsea.

This administration acknowledged the trade-off in using dispersants, made the decision to use dispersants, and now must deal with their own consequences. btw, contrary to what the EPA says about the "novel approach" of using dispersants at the source, it was a horrendous call. The oil should have been allowed to rise to the surface at the site so that it could be easily separated from the water. Any chemical engineer could explain the value of separation. The addition of emollients deprives one of the ability to extract the oil from the water.

37 posted on 08/17/2010 6:19:31 AM PDT by Hoodat (.For the weapons of our warfare are mighty in God for pulling down strongholds.)
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To: 1COUNTER-MORTER-68
BP squirted that Corexit at the blowout to keep the oil on the bottom so the fine they will have to pay will be less when all this mess goes to court,,,

That is total BS!!! If you don't know what you are talking about, you should go LEARN more. I'm amazed at the "libs" that are here on FR ... a little misinformation and they come out like frogs in the rain. I love to watch them dance to the piper's tune ... enjoying the dance?

The Patriot's Flag - Dispersants and the Piper

38 posted on 08/17/2010 6:55:38 AM PDT by ThePatriotsFlag (http://www.thepatriotsflag.com - The Patriot's Flag)
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To: mazda77

Just some greenie having a knee jerk reaction and looking for grant money. If this oil is down there it is very dilute and is being degraded naturally. It will never end up covering beaches, killing coral or fishes.


39 posted on 08/17/2010 7:06:16 AM PDT by east1234 (Cut, Kill, Dig and Drill!)
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To: lbryce
"The dispersant is moving the oil down out of the surface and into the deeper waters, where it can affect phytoplankton and other marine life," said John Paul, a marine microbiologist at USF.

How much phytoplankton is found in deeper waters? Phytoplankton depend on sunlight.

40 posted on 08/17/2010 7:33:10 AM PDT by Moonman62 (Politicians exist to break windows so they may spend other people's money to fix them.)
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To: lbryce
Initial findings from a new survey of the Gulf conclude that dispersants may have sent droplets of crude to the ocean floor, where it has turned up at the bottom of an undersea canyon within 40 miles of the Florida Panhandle. The results are scheduled to be released Tuesday, but CNN obtained a summary of the initial conclusions Monday night.

...

Plankton and other organisms at the base of the food chain showed a "strong toxic response" to the crude, and the oil could well up onto the continental shelf and resurface later, according to researchers.

41 posted on 08/17/2010 7:35:43 AM PDT by Moonman62 (Politicians exist to break windows so they may spend other people's money to fix them.)
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To: deport
"What’s the half life of these dispersants that were used?

Depending on which constitituents in the dispersants, 10-20 days.

"What happens to the crude when they become ineffective?"

By that time, the surfaces of the microscopic oil droplets have been colonized by bacteria which are eating the oil. The bacterial coating acts as a surfactant layer, so the oil stays "in solution", same as with the dispersant.

As the bacterial continue to eat the oil, the oil droplets shrink until the remaining oil is no longer providing sustenance. All that is left is the really high molecular weight stuff (same as is in tar balls), which is much less toxic.

Basically, the end result is a bunch of non-toxic microscopic tar balls that sink to the bottom of the GOM and stay there. By that time, the material is harmless to marine life.

42 posted on 08/17/2010 7:36:53 AM PDT by Wonder Warthog
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To: KDD
...into the deeper waters, where it can affect phytoplankton

This doesn't seem to make sense. Phytoplankton get their energy from photosynthesis. Deep water doesn't have any light, so how does it hurt the phytoplankton there?

43 posted on 08/17/2010 8:02:20 AM PDT by glorgau
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To: Moonman62; Carry_Okie; lbryce; Wonder Warthog; blam; SunkenCiv; Marine_Uncle; NormsRevenge; ...
How much phytoplankton is found in deeper waters?
Phytoplankton depend on sunlight.

The Scientists seemed to have not realized that....makes me wonder about their real scientific knowledge..

Wonder if they have an opinion on Global Warming?

44 posted on 08/17/2010 8:11:37 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: glorgau; lbryce; blam; Carry_Okie; deport; Eric in the Ozarks; norwaypinesavage; Wonder Warthog
And there is this statement....:

and the oil could well up onto the continental shelf and resurface later, according to researchers.

Is there some magic way that the heavy components of the crude ,...which separated from the lighter components and sank,...can then reach up and reunite with the lighter components and rise from the depths of the canyon and bring the phytoplankton with them...

************************************

This is CNN Garbage,....trying to find a way to get viewers eyeballs....

Was Blitzer involved with this one?

45 posted on 08/17/2010 8:22:57 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: packrat35

CNN trying to find an audience....see above comments...


46 posted on 08/17/2010 8:25:14 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
Phytoplankton depend on sunlight.

Not all algal species require sunlight. I have some 450 feet down my well.

47 posted on 08/17/2010 8:31:01 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (Government is an apex predator.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach
s there some magic way that the heavy components of the crude ,...which separated from the lighter components and sank,...can then reach up and reunite with the lighter components and rise from the depths of the canyon and bring the phytoplankton with them...

Yes, it's called "upwelling." Sometimes it is driven by the seasonal breakdown of the pycnocline, particularly in the winter. Other mechanisms include cyclical thermal inversions. It gets complicated.

As you know, I'm just as liable to deem an academic to be whoring as anybody. It's just that what he's saying is not to be totally discounted from the realm of possibility.

48 posted on 08/17/2010 8:40:43 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (Government is an apex predator.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach

The terms ‘heavy’ and ‘light’ deal with the viscosity of the oil, not the density. Both ‘light’ and ‘heavy’ crude have a density about 90% of water, so they both will float.


49 posted on 08/17/2010 8:43:22 AM PDT by norwaypinesavage (Galileo: In science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of one individual)
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To: Carry_Okie
From the Wikipedia:

Phytoplankton obtain energy through the process of photosynthesis and must therefore live in the well-lit surface layer (termed the euphotic zone) of an ocean, sea, lake, or other body of water. Phytoplankton account for half of all photosynthetic activity on Earth.

Phytoplankton are the foundation of the oceanic food chain.

And the article did use the word Phytoplankton

So I am keying on that word...and that is the major food source for the marine life.

50 posted on 08/17/2010 8:44:49 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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