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Google-Verizon should prompt FCC to demand Net Neutrality
San Jose Mercury News ^ | 8/12/10 | Susan Crawford and Lawrence Lessig

Posted on 08/17/2010 1:28:47 PM PDT by detritus

Candidate Barack Obama told America that he believed in an open and "neutral" Internet -- one where the owners of the wires didn't get to pick and choose which applications would run on the network. Soon after Julius Genachowski was appointed as President Barack Obama's choice to head the Federal Communications Commission, he outlined a clear and ambitious plan to turn that commitment into a reality.

But now Verizon and Google have struck a deal for a legislative template that would allow Verizon to be the gatekeeper for services running over its Internet Protocol pipe, and Google to be the colorful, well-branded winner. The outcome of this negotiation between Godzilla and Shamu may be good for them, but it would destroy the promise of a neutral network. The FCC needs to assert its authority if the chairman's and president's promises are to be kept.

If you've missed the early years of the net neutrality debate, here's a thumbnail:

The market for high-speed Internet access has become enormously consolidated. Most Americans have very few choices; relative to the rest of the industrialized world, prices remain high and speeds remain low. Because of the hands-off policy of the FCC under President George W. Bush, we don't have meaningful competition among broadband providers. And these giant carriers have every incentive to keep their prices high.

For this reason, Obama has long supported the idea that the carriers should not be able to choose who does well on their networks. New businesses should not have to ask permission before selling their services over the carriers' lines, any more than a new television manufacturer should have to ask permission from a local utility before being allowed to plug into the electricity grid....

(Excerpt) Read more at mercurynews.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Technical
KEYWORDS: bho44; bhofcc; broadband; fcc; freedom; freespeech; google; internet; telecom; verizon

1 posted on 08/17/2010 1:28:49 PM PDT by detritus
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To: detritus
For this reason, Obama has long supported the idea that the carriers should not be able to choose who does well on their networks.

If he's for it, I am against it.

2 posted on 08/17/2010 1:34:07 PM PDT by Puppage (You may disagree with what I have to say, but I shall defend to your death my right to say it)
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To: detritus

Why should I subsidize the juiceboxer participation in MMORPGs and uploading of videos to Facebook?


3 posted on 08/17/2010 1:36:00 PM PDT by oblomov
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To: detritus

All right. Can anyone out there explain “net neutrality” in several easy-to-understand paragraphs or at least direct me to the appropriate url?

When an issue is this much debated here-and-there but nobody takes the time to explain and define it for the benefit of us peasantry, this peasant starts getting suspicious.

Historically, I’ve found that when an issue is being called “complex” it’s because certain parties in power want to keep us “small people” ignorant.


4 posted on 08/17/2010 1:36:06 PM PDT by sinanju
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To: detritus

Obama is doing everything he can to distroy the concept of private property.


5 posted on 08/17/2010 1:38:01 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: sinanju
Basically, it means that your ISP can't block your access to some websites in order to favor others (for example, Net Neutrality means that Comcast can't slow down Hulu web traffic because it competes with Comcast cable).

It's the same principle as not allowing toll roads to take money from Toyota and then charging Ford cars a higher toll.

6 posted on 08/17/2010 1:39:02 PM PDT by detritus
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To: sinanju

It is simple there are two positions:

1) Cable companies have paid for the cost and installation of a whole lot of fiber, wire, and radio communications to build what they call “their network”. They believe that they then have the right to say how that network will be used. In particular, the owners of the network want to either allow only certain types of traffic or restrict the use of certain types of traffic.

2) Other people believe that they have the right to force companies to use their private property for the benefit of others and at the peril of the cable company. They believe that the evil for-profit companies should be required to carry the competitors traffic, or at the very least, not be allowed to restrict the flow of certain types of traffic.

It is the classic private property righs vs the socialist collective.


7 posted on 08/17/2010 1:42:40 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: Puppage

Exactly!

I am not sure it is as simple as a previous poster described it. I think there is a very dark side to this.

Something like equal access, or equal time, or every company gets the same amount of access so if one company wants more they need to buy it from another “company”.

Like carbon credits. If you want more you have to buy them from an entity that has excess.

For me, if Obama is for it, I am against it. And, if it involves the government regulating more, I am against it.

P.S. If Humble Gummer gives a blog pimp warning I am definitely going to visit the blog. People got to eat and some of those blogs are well built.


8 posted on 08/17/2010 1:48:12 PM PDT by BookaT (My cat's breath smells like cat food!)
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To: taxcontrol

Ahh! That’s more like it.

And of course the Ministry of Communications gets to decide how much bandwidth should be set aside for “public purposes” and “the greater good”, not to mention “minority set-asides”.

Thank you. I knew I wasn’t getting the straight story there.


9 posted on 08/17/2010 1:49:38 PM PDT by sinanju
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To: taxcontrol
Cable companies have obtained special privileges from local governments called "franchises", enabling them to gain artificial monopolies and shut out the free market. They wish to expand their government monopoly on the wires and obtain an additional monopoly on content, replacing the existing free market.

Other people believe that the existing free market in content should be retained.

Fixed it for you.
10 posted on 08/17/2010 1:50:10 PM PDT by detritus
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To: sinanju
I knew I wasn’t getting the straight story there.

The straight story is in Msg#6

11 posted on 08/17/2010 1:51:47 PM PDT by detritus
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To: detritus
Cable companies have obtained special privileges from local governments called "franchises", enabling them to gain artificial monopolies and shut out the free market. They wish to expand their government monopoly on the wires and obtain an additional monopoly on content, replacing the existing free market.

So. There are alternatives to cable, like Satellite, just as there would inevitably be alternatives for the Internet, as long as the government stayed out of the way.

12 posted on 08/17/2010 1:53:10 PM PDT by dfwgator
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To: detritus

My worry is that once you open the door here to government regulation, you aren’t going to get net neutrality. So Hulu might qualify, but I can imagine the FCC starting to allow regulations under pressure from big media companies like “ISP’s will be allowed to throttle or block traffic they believe contains content in violation of copyright law”. And rules like this will then be used by big business to block competition from legitimate start-ups (like a youtube competitor that might have 99% legit content, but also some TV episodes). The goal is noble, but once it gets perverted by both big government and big business there is more risk here than benefit.


13 posted on 08/17/2010 1:58:08 PM PDT by MrShoop
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To: detritus

Net neutrality is one of the big things that has allowed things like Google, Youtube, and Facebook to spring from nothing.


14 posted on 08/17/2010 2:31:12 PM PDT by DemonDeac
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To: taxcontrol

A provider owned by a left-wing company could very easily slow down traffic on conservative sites. Freerepublic could see itself on the information slow lane. Or providers could allow sites they are affiliated with to have enough speed for HD broadcasts but keep others from being quick enough for streaming video.

A cable company, to site your example, could easily slow down traffic from services like streaming netflix, hulu, or youtube because those compete with their services. Comcast already tried this. A phone company could put the squeeze on Skype, etc.

One of the great things about the Internet and one of the things that has allowed it to become such a democratizing entity is the fact that the architecture of the Internet doesn’t allow it to become dominated by those with the most resources to the expense of everyone else. Its allowed an independent conservative media to spring up and has made it easier for sites like FR to come into being. Its also made it possible for things like Google to come out of nowhere. It would be much harder for the next Google, Facebook, etc to spring up in a world where websites from the big media and service companies or their affiliates were allowed to run faster than anybody else.


15 posted on 08/17/2010 2:39:08 PM PDT by DemonDeac
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To: DemonDeac

Your statements are all true ... and equally true is my ability to purchase internet access from different providers. If I dont like the way one company performs, I can take my business elsewhere. It is called the free market.


16 posted on 08/17/2010 2:44:41 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: taxcontrol

How realistic is that? Do you really think that there will be enough providers out there to combat censorship and to allow the smaller sites access to the same resources as the big money sites? The companies will collude and startups and places like FR will end up on the slow lane for each and everyone. Maybe some will choose to slowdown different sites but either way you’ll see the internet increasingly becoming a place dominated by an ever shrinking number of sites and thats bad for everyone.


17 posted on 08/17/2010 2:49:46 PM PDT by DemonDeac
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To: taxcontrol

If the cable company screws you, go to the other cable company— oops, there isn’t another cable company, because of that whole government-franchise-monopoly thing.


18 posted on 08/17/2010 2:52:40 PM PDT by detritus
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To: DemonDeac

Where do you think censorship comes from? The free market or government? Net Neutrality puts power in the hands of a bigger government and at the control of unelected buerocrats? Governments ALWAYS grow power, regulation, taxation and enforcement. Giving the government the power to tell a private company what they can or can not do with the assets they have will soon have us seeing even greater government censorship.

The FCC did not stop at radio waves, no they went on to censor TV. Remember the fairness doctrine? Who put that in place? Was it private industry or government? Now you want to put the camel’s nose under the tent by allowing the FCC to say what traffic private property owners can carry? How long do you think the FCC will want to wait before they start wanting to regulate the content of that traffic?


19 posted on 08/17/2010 2:57:08 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: detritus
Well other than the monopoly thing (gee isn't that more government control) there are still several alternatives.

ISP types:
cable
DSL
dialup
sattelite
3G
fiber optic
powerline (PDSL)
direct radio
wireless (wifi, wimax, wwan, 3G, Edge, etc)

20 posted on 08/17/2010 3:05:02 PM PDT by taxcontrol
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To: detritus

ping


21 posted on 08/17/2010 3:16:02 PM PDT by Wuli
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