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[HELOCs] Home Equity Lines of Credit, the Next Looming Disaster?
Real Estate Channel ^ | 07 September 2010 | Keith Jurow

Posted on 09/07/2010 10:46:33 PM PDT by Lorianne

Madness of HELOC Lending During the Bubble Years

Aided by the seemingly limitless desire of banks to lend money, homeowners opened an incredible number of HELOCs during the bubble years of 2004-2006.

Nowhere was the madness of HELOC borrowing more astounding than in California. During the two key years of 2004 and 2005, a total of 1.43 million HELOCs were originated in California just for the purchase of homes according to figures received from CoreLogic.

Wait a minute, you say. That's more than the total number of homes sold in California during these years. Correct. A total of 1.25 million existing single family homes were purchased in California in 2004-2005 according to the California Association of Realtors.

At first, these California HELOC numbers may be a little puzzling. However, they make sense when you consider the speculative mania that occurred during the bubble years. In my earlier REAL ESTATE CHANNEL article about investor speculation, there was an example of caravans filled with out-of-state speculators looking to buy investment properties in Austin. One was a young Californian who had sold a few of his Phoenix investment properties so he could roll his profits into Austin homes.

This is what thousands of HELOCs were used for in California. In 2004-2005, borrowers would take out a purchase HELOC to buy investment properties in other hot markets such as Las Vegas and Phoenix. While the loans were recorded as California HELOCs because the borrower's property was in California, the purchased home was actually in another state. CoreLogic provided the following HELOC origination numbers for California.

[chart]

According to CoreLogic, an additional 868,000 HELOCs were originated in California during 2004-2005 as "cash-out" refinancings of previous HELOCs. These homeowners tapped their piggy bank house by refinancing their HELOC with a larger available credit line.

When the housing market finally collapsed in 2007, banks were slow to curtail their HELOC lending. Equifax reported that 4.6 million new HELOCs were originated in 2007-2008.

California was different. From a peak of nearly 92,000 in June 2005, purchase HELOCs had plunged to a mere 563 by December 2008. In March of this year, only 22 were closed throughout all of California. That's right - twenty-two. Unfortunately, the damage had already been done.

Massive Problem of Underwater Homeowners with HELOCs

Another earlier REAL ESTATE CHANNEL article cited an Equifax report that 13.6 million HELOCs were outstanding in September 2009. A phone update with Equifax on August 31, 2010 clarified that since September 2008, banks have reduced available lines of credit for HELOC users by $122 billion. Notwithstanding this tightening, there was still a total of $649 billion outstanding HELOC debt nationwide in July 2010 and 13.2 million HELOCs.

Although the average outstanding HELOC balance is roughly $49,000 now, this figure hides the real problem. The average HELOC written in California for residential purchase in 2004 was $150,000 and in 2005 was $139,000. Hundreds of thousands of Californians took out a HELOC and then refinanced it several times to pull cash out from their growing equity. Here is an example of how it worked from a recent post on IrvineHousingBlog:

"The original sales price is not clear from my records, but it looks as if the buyers paid about $1,200,000 in 1997. There was a $900,000 loan which I assume was 80% of the total purchase price. The original owners were a couple, and after the point where only the wife is on title in 2004 -- presumably after a divorce -- the HELOC abuse became truly remarkable.

On 3/11/2004 the wife appears alone on title, and the first mortgage is $999,800. On 8/30/2004 she refinanced with a $1,000,000 first mortgage. On 12/28/2005 she refinanced with a $2,170,000 first mortgage. On 2/1/2006 she got a HELOC for $250,000. On 8/22/2006 she refinanced with an Option ARM for $2,500,000. On 11/15/2006 she opened a HELOC for $490,000. On 8/1/2007 she refinanced with another Option ARM for $3,225,000. On 10/22/2007 she opened a HELOC for $500,000. Total property debt is $3,725,000. Total mortgage equity withdrawal is $2,725,200 during a four-year stretch."

Of the 13.2 million outstanding HELOCs, it is not far-fetched to estimate that at least 95% of these borrowers are in "negative equity" when you add the first and second liens together. For California, the figure could be 98%.

The following situation, described on the advice blog, bills.com in November 2009, is quite common in California:

"I purchased my home in CA for $300K. I then refinanced in 2001 and pulled money out for upgrading the home - new home loan $480K. I refinanced again for a better interest rate (non-adjustable). In 2006, I opened a home equity line of credit to upgrade again (build a pool, etc.). My home equity line of credit is now at $248K. Total loans on home are today about $718K. I am in good standing with loan modification with the first but cannot afford to pay home equity line of credit."

You're probably wondering why the HELOC lender let the homeowner run up a loan balance of $248,000, especially since it was not even taken out until 2006 when home prices were already leveling off. Unlike first mortgages the vast majority of which were sold by lenders and securitized during the bubble years, second liens were kept on the balance sheet of the banks. But this was California where prices went in only one direction - up.

A sadder situation described on the same blog is that of a 62 year old California homeowner who purchased his house in 1975 for $38,000. He refinanced "3-4 times over the years" mainly for "personal use - cars, etc." The first lien is now $365,000. He opened the HELOC seven years ago and continually tapped into it. The outstanding balance on it had climbed to $265,000. Because the condo had plunged in value to only $350,000, this homeowner stopped making payments on the first mortgage four months earlier.

Nationwide, a growing number of "underwater" homeowners have already stopped paying on their first mortgage and many have halted payments on both the first and the HELOC. Some lenders are going after defaulting HELOC borrowers by asking a court to garnish the borrower's wages. Borrowers in this situation often pursue the option of filing for a Chapter 13 bankruptcy in which the judge has the option to reclassify the HELOC as an unsecured loan.

We need to keep in mind that HELOC loans are overwhelmingly second liens which stand in line behind the first mortgage in case of foreclosure. If a bank forecloses on the first mortgage of an underwater homeowner, the HELOC second lien holder is essentially wiped out. The HELOC becomes an unsecured loan and it is up to the lender to decide whether or not to try to work out some kind of deal with the borrower for a portion of the remaining balance.

In short sale situations where there is a first mortgage and a HELOC, the realtor often tries to negotiate with the HELOC holder to work out a discounted payoff on the HELOC that is acceptable. The HELOC lender has no leverage because if a foreclosure is pursued by the first mortgage holder, the HELOC is basically worthless.

One Texas realtor's website, shortsalestexas.net, actually provides advice on how to pursue these negotiations. He suggests offering 3% of the HELOC balance to the lender. If the lender balks, he counsels realtors not to offer any more than 5% of the balance. He claims that in his experience most lenders have accepted his initial offer.

Sea of Troubles Facing "Too Big to Fail" Banks

In mid-April of this year, the website housingwatch.com as well as others posted a summary of the sobering report issued by the research firm, CreditSights. The report warned that HELOCs were the next big problem for the large "too big to fail" banks.

Let's see why they might issue such a warning. Remember, there are currently $649 billion in HELOC loans outstanding. Three of the "too big to fail' banks reported a total of $321 billion in outstanding HELOC loans on their balance sheet in the second quarter 2010 Call Reports which came out a few weeks ago.

Does this mean that these banks have $321 billion in potentially worthless loans? You judge. On August 12, I spoke at length with the owner of a Utah-based firm whose business is buying HELOC and home equity loans from the large banks. His business is divided between secured second liens where the first mortgagee had not yet foreclosed and unsecured second liens in which the lender had already foreclosed.

It is a risky business because the borrowers have already defaulted and the bank has written off the debt. Unlike many other second lien debt collectors who have gone out of business, he has survived by buying only 1% of all the defaulted loans that are offered to him by the banks. In effect, he becomes the banker and his job is to work out new terms on a loan which is a small fraction of the original debt. The key to his success is coming up with terms that the borrower is willing to accept and make regular payments on.

Because the loan amount which these borrowers are willing to agree to is relatively low, this business owner made it clear that he will not pay much for a second lien regardless of the size of the outstanding loan balance. For unsecured second liens where the property has already been foreclosed, he will not pay more than $500 no matter what the size of the outstanding debt.

What this tells me is that most of the $321 billion in HELOCs loans owned by the "too big to fail" banks are probably worth no more than a few thousand dollars each if the borrower defaults. A growing number of HELOCs where the property has already been foreclosed and repossessed by the banks are worth perhaps $500 each.

It sounds incredible, doesn't it? Clearly, banks are recognizing the seriousness of the HELOC problem. According to an August 11 article published in the New York Times, banks charged off $19.9 billion of HELOCs in 2009 and another $7.88 billion in this year's first quarter. Those three "too big to fail banks" together charged off a total of $6.62 billion in HELOCs in the first half of 2010 as reported in their second quarter Call Reports.

The enormity of the HELOC disaster is well-illustrated by the example of a Phoenix attorney cited in that August New York Times article. He had been retained by nearly 300 new clients in the past year who were planning to walk away from their properties even though they could afford to pay the first mortgage - so-called "strategic defaulters." They all had home equity loans which ranged from $50,000 to $150,000.

Only 5% of these clients said they would continue paying their home equity loans no matter what. The other 85% of them said they would default on the second lien and worry about it "only if and when they were forced to."

It is truly worrisome to contemplate what could happen if this attitude continues to spread among the millions of underwater HELOC borrowers.

[Edited out first paragraphs explaining what HELOCs are ... figured most know]


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Government; US: California
KEYWORDS: bankingcrisis; debts; heloc; homeequityloan; homeloans

1 posted on 09/07/2010 10:46:35 PM PDT by Lorianne
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To: Lorianne
A sadder situation described on the same blog is that of a 62 year old California homeowner who purchased his house in 1975 for $38,000. He refinanced "3-4 times over the years" mainly for "personal use - cars, etc." The first lien is now $365,000. He opened the HELOC seven years ago and continually tapped into it. The outstanding balance on it had climbed to $265,000. Because the condo had plunged in value to only $350,000, this homeowner stopped making payments on the first mortgage four months earlier.

This sounds like compulsive spending and the "homeowner" - not really an owner because of all his debts - is very silly. The banks are silly as well, of course.

2 posted on 09/07/2010 10:56:12 PM PDT by BlackVeil
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To: Lorianne

Oh Buddy.

This is for real. HELOCs are WAY WAY over the mark.

We haven’t seen the end of this economy yet.

The bottom is way way far off.


3 posted on 09/07/2010 10:57:46 PM PDT by RachelFaith (2010 is going to be a 100 seat Tsunami - Welcome to "The Hunt for Red November".)
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To: Lorianne

People are so stupid. Home equity is not a bank account. It is the beginning of folks paying off their homes. People use this money to pay off credit cards? How stupid. If people are going to burn for this...it is their fault.


4 posted on 09/07/2010 11:02:11 PM PDT by napscoordinator
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To: Lorianne; All

I am so glad I did not get caught up in the housing bubble frenzy. I did get HELOCs on two properties that I owned free and clear, but only for about 1/5th the value of each. At 3.25% this enabled me to pay off all credit cards, continue making the HELOC payments and do major repairs and improvements on these 100 year old properties. I just hope and pray that the 3.25% rate continues for several more years, by which time I should have enough rental income to pay them off quickly.


5 posted on 09/07/2010 11:04:33 PM PDT by gleeaikin (question authority)
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To: BlackVeil

Sounds like he siphoned off about half a million dollars out of his home over the years and now he’s not going to pay anymore, and he’s the “victim?” Okay.


6 posted on 09/08/2010 1:44:52 AM PDT by 2ndDivisionVet (I don't need a newspaper to know the world's been shaved by a drunken barber.)
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To: napscoordinator

Actually a HELOC if managed properly is a great way to consolidate and reduce debt to manageable levels.

Instead of having 5-6 credit cards with interest rates of 15-20% and payments 0f $4-600 monthly, you would be able to drop the pmt drastically and reduce the interest rate by 2/3 or more.

The secret then is to have the discipline to NOT again run up the credit cards or use the HELOC as an ATM.


7 posted on 09/08/2010 2:05:12 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: Lorianne

This article describes pure stupidity on the part of “homeowners”. I have no sympathy for these idiots. I recall some Freeper on here in the past telling me how superior California is to my home state of Indiana. Suffer and die California!


8 posted on 09/08/2010 2:36:45 AM PDT by caver (Obama: Home of the Whopper)
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To: Lorianne
One thing the autor failed to mention is the recourse nature of home equity loans. Foreclosure does not automatically resolve the debt, even in a nonjudicial foreclosure state like California.

Caveat Emptor.

9 posted on 09/08/2010 3:03:13 AM PDT by mac_truck ( Aide toi et dieu t aidera)
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To: 101voodoo

You’re right as far as when a person is already in a bind, but better still is to have the discipline to avoid debt in the first place. The guy would have had the house free and clear by 2000—and that’s with no extra payments.

I hope Karl Denninger gets a hold of this story....this hits all his hot button issues.


10 posted on 09/08/2010 3:26:05 AM PDT by Claud
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To: Lorianne

This is a real bad topic to bring up if you’re Wells Fargo.


11 posted on 09/08/2010 3:40:24 AM PDT by Rational Thought
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To: Rational Thought

This is a real bad topic to bring up if you’re Wells Fargo.
*****************************************************
Because WF wrote so many HELOC’s or because they have lost lawsuits pertaining to their illegal methods of collection?


12 posted on 09/08/2010 3:49:02 AM PDT by Neidermeyer
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To: 101voodoo
“The secret then is to have the discipline to NOT again run up the credit cards or use the HELOC as an ATM.” When was the last time you saw an add for HELOCs that emphasized discipline? I'm just sayin’... As I see it, banks have felt comfortable in giving people loans for more than 100% of the value of the houses because Congress has kept sending signals that the Federal government will bail everyone out. FDIC coverage went up = bank has to have less actual liquidity. Community Re-investment Act = bank has to have less actual liquidity. Bailout legislation = bank has to have less actual liquidity. etc. The banks of recent years have not had to worry about risk. Lendees have not had to worry about risk. Wall Street has not had to worry about risk. And then reality struck. Sooooo, a lot of companies are sitting on their cash, waiting out the convulsions and twitchings of Washington. And the economic recovery takes that much longer.
13 posted on 09/08/2010 4:02:42 AM PDT by Pecos (Liberty and Honor will not die on my watch.)
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To: Neidermeyer
As of 2008, they had $84 Billion in outstanding HELOC’s.

Honestly, I'm not familiar with their methods of collection.

14 posted on 09/08/2010 4:16:21 AM PDT by Rational Thought
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To: Pecos
"When was the last time you saw an add for HELOCs that emphasized discipline?"

Never and I don't expect to, nor is it the banks responsibility to explain to an increasingly moronic public what should be common sense. I have zero sympathy for the fools who bury themselves in debt, willingly or the banks which so freely handed it out. As for investors, my feeling is anyone who puts money in the markets and then has the nerve to complain when they lose it, ought to be put in jail for being to stupid to walk around free.

15 posted on 09/08/2010 4:58:26 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: Lorianne

Not mentioned in this story is that crackpot Chairman of the Federal Reserve Alan Greenspan. In the late 1990’s/early 2000’s it was Alan Greenspan who was patting himself on the back for getting homeowners to take out home equity loans.

You can blame stupid homeowners, but the stupidity began at the top. Namely, the FED and Congress.


16 posted on 09/08/2010 7:55:58 AM PDT by Presbyterian Reporter
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To: 101voodoo

You know what is funny about your post. I bet you never took a HELOC out to pay off bills....The folks who say, this is a great deal, if you manage and control yourself are always the ones who are responsible already.....Of course, this is no surprise to me, as you are a. FRiend and we for the most part are very responsible with life. You can tell that all of us care about the U.S. and see what debt does to a country so we want to ensure our own lives are managed correctly whether it be family, finances, beliefs, life, etc. Glad you are on our side!!!!!


17 posted on 09/08/2010 8:56:08 AM PDT by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator

LOL, well, you just happen to be right about me never using a HELOC to consolidate debt. I pay my c cards monthly and in full. I do have a HELOC however and it currently carries a 2.74% rate. I have used it to purchase a great set of speakers which I paid off in 6 months and would use it again for major purchases since I can realize a greater return by leaving the money in the bank then by paying cash.

I also take advantage of the many extended finance at zero interest rate plans which abound at this time. In 2008 I furnished our new home (partially) with $8000 in new furniture and a 60 month 0% finance plan. There was no reason to NOT take it since the store offered no discount for paying cash.


18 posted on 09/08/2010 9:47:21 AM PDT by 101voodoo
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Exactly.
And if you look closely into all thes sob stories we’ve been fed for almost 3 years now, you’ll find most are the same.

Yet there is a hue and cry to ‘save’ peoples homes.
What homes? They don’t have homes, they have ATM machines.


19 posted on 09/08/2010 11:08:24 AM PDT by Lorianne (During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act. ___ George Orwell)
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To: 101voodoo

I agree.

The ONLY tradgedy here is that the we can’t contain the pain to ONLY the stupid borrowers and the stupid lenders.

Unfortunately, we’re all gonna pay.


20 posted on 09/08/2010 11:12:17 AM PDT by Lorianne (During times of universal deceit, telling the truth becomes a revolutionary act. ___ George Orwell)
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To: Claud
I hope Karl Denninger gets a hold of this story....

Already did:

The HELOC Monster In The Room.

21 posted on 09/08/2010 5:41:39 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: 101voodoo

I couldn’t figure out how to add an emoticon that quite worked when I talked about discipline. I am solidly on your side when it comes to individual responsibility.


22 posted on 09/09/2010 4:00:59 AM PDT by Pecos (Liberty and Honor will not die on my watch.)
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