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Ancient Virus Found Hiding Out in Finch Genome
ScienceNOW ^ | 28 September 2010 | Cassandra Willyard

Posted on 10/02/2010 11:21:25 AM PDT by neverdem

Enlarge Image
sn-viruses.jpg
Buried gem. Researchers have uncovered "fossil virus" inside the zebra finch genome.
Credit: Peripitus/Wikimedia

The hepatitis B virus and its ilk have been around for a long, long time. A newly uncovered "viral fossil" buried deep in the genome of the zebra finch indicates that the hepatitis B family of viruses—known as hepadnaviruses—originated at least 19 million years ago. Together with recent findings on other viruses, the work suggests that all viruses may be much older than thought.

No one knows exactly where or when viruses originated. They don't leave fossils, so scientists have begun scouring the DNA of various organisms, looking for evidence of ancient infections. Based on fragments of viral genes found in the DNA of bats and wallabies, for example, researchers have deduced that relatives of the Ebola and Marburg viruses began infecting mammals tens of millions of years ago.

The hepadnavirus discovery came about almost by chance. Late one night, Cédric Feschotte, an evolutionary geneticist at the University of Texas, Arlington, was browsing the DNA sequence database GenBank. On a whim, he typed in the amino acid sequence that makes up the hepatitis B virus. "I was just playing," he says. Feschotte wasn't expecting to find much, but a match appeared in the genome of the zebra finch. Closer inspection revealed that the finch genome contained 15 hepadnavirus fragments spread out over 10 chromosomes.

Feschotte and his postdoc, Clément Gilbert, set about trying to figure out how long ago the virus entered the finch genome. They collected tissue samples from five species related to zebra finches—the olive sunbird, the dark-eyed junco, the gouldian finch, the scaly-breasted munia, and the black-throated finch. When a virus inserts itself into the DNA of its host, it does so at a random spot. So the researchers reasoned that if they found the viral fragment in the same place in two related birds, they could be confident that the insertion must have occurred prior to the divergence of these two species.

A previous study put the age of hepadnaviruses at less than 6000 years. And the hepadnavirus in the finch genome was quite similar to the modern hepatitis B virus that infects ducks. So the researchers assumed that the integration had happened relatively recently.

Yet when they sequenced those spots in the genome where the hepadnavirus fragments appeared in the zebra finch, they found that the virus was very old. Viral fragments were present in all the birds except the olive sunbird, which diverged from the other species some 35 million years ago. The scientists inferred that the first insertion must have taken place between 35 million and 25 million years ago, when the junco, the next oldest relative, split off.

To verify their results, the researchers turned to the molecular clock method, which assumes a constant rate of genetic mutation to date a species. Because the virus was part of the finch genome, they used the standard mutation rate for birds. The analysis revealed that the hepadnavirus first entered the bird genome between 19 million and 40 million years ago, the authors report online today in PLoS Biology. "The 19 million years is a minimum age, and it's one we're very confident about," Feschotte says.

It's an "elegant" study that has "completely changed our understanding of the timescale of the evolution of this virus," says Eddie Holmes, an evolutionary biologist at Pennsylvania State University, University Park. The dates they give are "very believable." Yet modern hepadnavirus sequences appear to be only a few thousand years old. Scientists haven't yet worked out a way to reconcile those two estimates, he says.

The finding that the ancient hepadnavirus is remarkably similar to modern viruses suggests that hepadnaviruses weren't always locked in an evolutionary arms race with their hosts, says Harmit Malik, an evolutionary geneticist at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington. If they had been, the modern viruses would be more distinct.

As genomes become available for more species, researchers will likely uncover even more viral remnants hiding in them, says Feschotte. And that will lead to a better understanding of the evolutionary history of all viruses.


TOPICS: Culture/Society; News/Current Events; Testing
KEYWORDS: ancient; evolution; finch; genetics; genome; godsgravesglyphs; hepatitisb; hiding; microbiology; viral; virus; viruses; zebrafinch

1 posted on 10/02/2010 11:21:29 AM PDT by neverdem
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To: neverdem
"They don't leave fossils, so scientists have begun scouring the DNA of various organisms, looking for evidence of ancient infections. "

This sounds like a worthwhile effort. Maybe Darwin was on to something with the finches.

2 posted on 10/02/2010 11:24:39 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Paladin2
"This sounds like a worthwhile effort. Maybe Darwin was on to something with the finches. "

It wasn't just the finches. You have virus fossils in your body too. Some have evolved to be beneficial to you too.

3 posted on 10/02/2010 11:33:37 AM PDT by blam
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To: Paladin2

No offense, friend, but genomics has proven that Darwin didn’t know his gluteous maximus from Page 8. The only reason that otherwise rational people have glommed onto his psychobabble is because it forms the basis for denial of a Creator; a Creator/Judge to whom all must someday give an account.........unless they have a Savior.


4 posted on 10/02/2010 11:34:30 AM PDT by Tucker39
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To: allmendream

Virus “fossil” ping!


5 posted on 10/02/2010 11:38:46 AM PDT by James C. Bennett
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To: blam
"It wasn't just the finches."

No doubt. Just trying to gin up some entertainment this afternoon.

This book is a good read for the scientifically inclined/interested:

The Beak of the Finch: A Story of Evolution in Our Time

6 posted on 10/02/2010 11:52:55 AM PDT by Paladin2
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To: Tucker39
The only reason that otherwise rational people have glommed onto his psychobabble is because it forms the basis for denial of a Creator; a Creator/Judge to whom all must someday give an account.........unless they have a Savior.

How so? Darwin's theory doea not contradict the idea that something does not come from nothing.

7 posted on 10/02/2010 12:06:39 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: neverdem

8 posted on 10/02/2010 12:08:14 PM PDT by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: All

Correction: Darwin’s theory does not contradict the idea that something does not come from nothing.


9 posted on 10/02/2010 12:08:51 PM PDT by neverdem (Xin loi minh oi)
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To: neverdem; Tucker39
Correction: Darwin’s theory does not contradict the idea that something does not come from nothing.

It's also not psychology (psychobabble).

10 posted on 10/02/2010 12:54:14 PM PDT by decimon
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To: neverdem

Flintstone Flu?


11 posted on 10/02/2010 1:03:50 PM PDT by WKUHilltopper (Fix bayonets!)
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To: Tucker39
No offense, friend, but genomics has proven that Darwin didn’t know his gluteous maximus from Page 8.

What do you have in mind? Because Darwin's central ideas were natural selection and common descent. And genomics (the sequencing and study of genomes) has certainly provided massive new evidence confirming common descent.

Absent common descent, for instance, nothing about the study described in this article would make any sense, and the result wouldn't even have been possible.

BTW, fossil virsus have also been found in the same positions in the DNA of humans and apes. And, as in the present study, they fit the necessary patterns of common descent (e.g. if present in humans and gorillas, must also be present in chimps; if present in orangutans and humans, must also be present in gorillas and chimps; etc).

Given that the particular place in the genome into which a virsus inserts itself is random, and that genomes are absurdly (haystack versus needle) massive compared to viruses, how do you explain, apart from common descent, how different species end up with the same fossil viruses in the same places in their DNA?

12 posted on 10/02/2010 3:44:20 PM PDT by Stultis (Democrats. Still devoted to the three S's: Slavery, Segregation and Socialism.)
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To: Stultis

So when you go through the fossil record and find avian influenza infecting men, that means that men evolved from birds?


13 posted on 10/03/2010 2:35:10 AM PDT by BenKenobi ("Henceforth I will call nothing else fair unless it be her gift to me")
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To: BenKenobi
Well, I would respond to your non sequitur as follows:
14 posted on 10/03/2010 2:56:50 AM PDT by Stultis (Democrats. Still devoted to the three S's: Slavery, Segregation and Socialism.)
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To: Stultis; StayAt HomeMother; Ernest_at_the_Beach; 1010RD; 21twelve; 24Karet; 2ndDivisionVet; ...

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Thanks Stultis, didn't see this (or get pinged to it), found it in your "in forums" list. Definitely pingworthy.

A newly uncovered "viral fossil" buried deep in the genome of the zebra finch indicates that the hepatitis B family of viruses -- known as hepadnaviruses -- originated at least 19 million years ago. Together with recent findings on other viruses, the work suggests that all viruses may be much older than thought. No one knows exactly where or when viruses originated. They don't leave fossils, so scientists have begun scouring the DNA of various organisms, looking for evidence of ancient infections.
To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.
 

· History topic · history keyword · archaeology keyword · paleontology keyword ·
· Science topic · science keyword · Books/Literature topic · pages keyword ·


15 posted on 10/11/2010 6:03:59 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: neverdem; Paladin2; blam; James C. Bennett; decimon; WKUHilltopper
Good excuse for me to reprise this oldie:
The Scars of Evolution:
What Our Bodies Tell Us
About Human Origins

by Elaine Morgan
"The most remarkable aspect of Todaro's discovery emerged when he examined Homo Sapiens for the 'baboon marker'. It was not there... Todaro drew one firm conclusion. 'The ancestors of man did not develop in a geographical area where they would have been in contact with the baboon. I would argue that the data we are presenting imply a non-African origin of man millions of years ago.'"

16 posted on 10/11/2010 6:04:22 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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The Doctor Fun Page

17 posted on 10/11/2010 6:05:43 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: martin_fierro

You still have a genetic archaeology ping list?


18 posted on 10/11/2010 6:06:50 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: neverdem

So, that’s where it’s been all this time!


19 posted on 10/11/2010 6:09:06 PM PDT by SuzyQue (Remember to think.)
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To: neverdem

Ebola and Marburg likely comes from bats. However, we have not found the virus in nature yet, just genetic evidence in bats.


20 posted on 10/11/2010 6:41:45 PM PDT by Ptarmigan (God Hates Bunnies.)
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To: neverdem; blam; SunkenCiv; Paladin2

Mebbe those terrible lizards got wiped out by a tiny little virus. After it emerged from the giant asteroid that struck near abouts then, of course.


21 posted on 10/11/2010 7:15:07 PM PDT by bigheadfred ("We built a tower of stone. With our flesh and bone. To see him fly ." (RIP RJD))
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To: neverdem

If only those ancient finches hadn’t shared needles . . . .


22 posted on 10/12/2010 8:58:33 AM PDT by colorado tanker
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To: Tucker39

This is a link to an excellent article that shows the circular-firing-squad reasoning that Darwin and his current imitators use ......

http://www.icr.org/article/5660/


23 posted on 10/12/2010 9:45:44 AM PDT by fishtank (The denial of original sin is the root of liberalism.)
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To: bigheadfred

They went extinct because of reptile dysfunction.


24 posted on 10/12/2010 6:24:16 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: SunkenCiv
Might as well flesh it out.

Those terrible lizards got wiped out by a tiny little virus. After it emerged from the giant asteroid that struck near abouts then, of course. They went extinct because of reptile dysfunction caused by the newly arrived Herpes virus. Ask any Herpetologist.

25 posted on 10/12/2010 6:34:28 PM PDT by bigheadfred ("We built a tower of stone. With our flesh and bone. To see him fly ." (RIP RJD))
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To: bigheadfred

That was outstanding!


26 posted on 10/12/2010 6:59:24 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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