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Sick PCs should be banned from the net says Microsoft
BBC News ^ | 10/6/10 | Staff

Posted on 10/06/2010 12:08:46 PM PDT by Nachum

Virus-infected computers that pose a risk to other PCs should be blocked from the net, a senior researcher at software giant Microsoft suggests. The proposal is based on lessons from public health, said Scott Charney of the firm's Trustworthy Computing team. It is designed to tackle botnets - networks of infected computers under the control of cybercriminals. Putting machines in temporary quarantine would stop the spread of a virus and allow it to be cleaned.

(Excerpt) Read more at bbc.co.uk ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: banned; pcs; should; sick
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1 posted on 10/06/2010 12:08:47 PM PDT by Nachum
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To: Nachum
But .... but sometimes the fix can only be found on the net!
2 posted on 10/06/2010 12:14:47 PM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: Nachum

Well, as MS is the primary target of virus’, trojans, malware, etc etc etc thanks to their security holes, and an inability to identify many such problems in a timely basis, do they really think Mom, Pop, and little Kenny and Jenny are going to brand new identify virus’ on their machines?


3 posted on 10/06/2010 12:19:13 PM PDT by theDentist (fybo; qwerty ergo typo : i type, therefore i misspelll)
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To: Nachum
based on lessons from public health,

We let anyone with aids into the US and when they are here they are free to roam.

4 posted on 10/06/2010 12:20:20 PM PDT by DUMBGRUNT (The best is the enemy of the good!)
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To: Nachum
What an altrustic act on the part of Microsoft, since essentially all infected computers are running their operating systems.
5 posted on 10/06/2010 12:20:39 PM PDT by Johnny B.
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To: Nachum

“Sick” PCs could also be defined as those spreading the “wrong” opinions.


6 posted on 10/06/2010 12:22:03 PM PDT by glorgau
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To: Nachum

This is the one of the reasons why I have for buying a Mac, CONCERN about computer viruses.


7 posted on 10/06/2010 12:25:57 PM PDT by Biggirl (GO UCONN FOOTBALL!!!!!!!!!!! :)=^..^=)
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To: Nachum; rdb3; Calvinist_Dark_Lord; GodGunsandGuts; CyberCowboy777; Salo; Bobsat; JosephW; ...

8 posted on 10/06/2010 12:26:07 PM PDT by ShadowAce (Linux -- The Ultimate Windows Service Pack)
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To: Johnny B.

“What an altrustic act on the part of Microsoft, since essentially all infected computers are running their operating systems.”

Since MS has 92% of the desktop market its pretty likely your statement would be true. Trend micro stated there are a 100,000 new pieces of malware released every 2 days.


9 posted on 10/06/2010 12:31:32 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Biggirl

As the recent adobe issues revealed all OS’s are vulnerable.


10 posted on 10/06/2010 12:34:14 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Nachum
The proposal is based on lessons from public health

The quarantine model was abandoned when a certain preferred social group became the main carriers of a certain deadly disease in the 1980s.

11 posted on 10/06/2010 12:35:49 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Judas Iscariot - the first social justice advocate. John 12:3-6)
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To: Nachum

Sounds reasonable. Don’t ISP’s do that already?


12 posted on 10/06/2010 12:36:03 PM PDT by bvw
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To: Nachum

A straight-forward admission that they don’t know how to fix the problem, isn’t it?


13 posted on 10/06/2010 12:37:02 PM PDT by righttackle44 (I may not be much, but I raised a United States Marine.)
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To: driftdiver

“As the recent adobe issues revealed all OS’s are vulnerable.”

Yes, but some are more vulnerable than others.


14 posted on 10/06/2010 12:37:44 PM PDT by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: TexasRepublic

Arbitrary code execution is arbitrary code execution.


15 posted on 10/06/2010 12:38:45 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: righttackle44

“A straight-forward admission that they don’t know how to fix the problem, isn’t it?”

100,000 new malware signatures every two days. Does anyone know how to solve that problem? Especially since much of it is coming out of Russia and China.


16 posted on 10/06/2010 12:40:08 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Nachum

The core of the problem is the “computer in every home” business model. A very large percentage of the public lack the skills/common sense to be responsible for maintaining a computer system. I wouldn’t be surprised to see online access moving towards delivery via IPTV systems in the future. Which brings up the analogy:

When people who don’t understand what the “Input” button on their television is for are put in charge of maintaining a computer, is it any wonder so many computers are infected?


17 posted on 10/06/2010 12:42:06 PM PDT by Jeff Chandler (Judas Iscariot - the first social justice advocate. John 12:3-6)
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To: driftdiver

But every sick computer could be cured just by upgrading to the latest Microsoft operating system, couldn’t it? That, plus a $500 or so in hardware upgrades from which Microsoft gets a license fee. Don’t you think that’s reasonable? < / sarcasm >


18 posted on 10/06/2010 12:42:36 PM PDT by Vigilanteman (Obama: Fake black man. Fake Messiah. Fake American. How many fakes can you fit in one Zer0?)
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To: Nachum
He was formally asked to disclose his password but failed to do so, which is an offence under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000

Microsoft itself has circulated infected signoff materials (.DOC files with prank macros) to companies. Microsoft itself is guilty of spreading viruses.

Microsoft itself requires users to either "download" the patches directly to affected machines or wait for a CD with the patches to be mailed.

Why can't users just download ALL of the files to one system and then transfer them?

19 posted on 10/06/2010 12:44:33 PM PDT by a fool in paradise (Ask yourself,where does Saudi Arabia fit on a scale of "passive" to "moderate" to "extremist" Islam?)
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To: bvw

ISPs will remove your connect until you fix your problem. I think the current trend is to bypass the ISP and give govt some kind of control.

I’ve seen many companies that fail miserably at any kind of patch or update process. They just won’t spend any time or money on fixing their problems.


20 posted on 10/06/2010 12:44:46 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Nachum

“The proposal is based on lessons from public health,...”

I guess he is talking about controllable plagues like AIDS.

Of course, most fixes for viruses are on the Internet.


21 posted on 10/06/2010 12:45:10 PM PDT by pallis
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To: Vigilanteman

“But every sick computer could be cured just by upgrading to the latest Microsoft operating system, couldn’t it?”

Sure it COULD be fixed that way. Or you could just fix the problem without spending any money on hardware or licenses.


22 posted on 10/06/2010 1:07:17 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Nachum

This doesn’t sound very PC. Infected PCs need the net so they heal themselves. How can it be beneficial to the PC community as a whole to segregate those most in need.

My company just kicks off the Domain.


23 posted on 10/06/2010 1:29:25 PM PDT by ThomasThomas (I still like peanut butter)
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To: Nachum

Uh, but then that would mean 90% of all home microsoft-based PCs would have to be disconnected, and then since they were disconnected, there would be no way to fix them.

Brilliant plan, Microsoft! First, make a family of operating systems that are such a horrific mess internally that they are literally impossible to secure, Second, create the solution, namely, don’t use PCs with your impossible-to-secure operating system for anything except playing solitaire. Poetically symmetric, don’t you think?


24 posted on 10/06/2010 1:51:37 PM PDT by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Made from The Right Stuff!)
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To: Nachum

Death Panels for computers and the Internet??????


25 posted on 10/06/2010 2:15:32 PM PDT by jettester (I got paid to break 'em - not fly 'em)
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To: Nachum; Swordmaker; Ernest_at_the_Beach; ShadowAce

Agreed.

26 posted on 10/06/2010 2:49:14 PM PDT by martin_fierro (< |:)~)
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To: Nachum

This doesn’t sound very PC. Infected PCs need the net so they heal themselves. How can it be beneficial to the PC community as a whole to segregate those most in need.

My company just kicks off the Domain.


27 posted on 10/06/2010 2:53:47 PM PDT by ThomasThomas (I still like peanut butter)
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To: Nachum
Sick PCs should be banned from the net says Microsoft

Very courageous. "Everybody who buys our products, no more internet for you! Here are Apple and Red Hat's phone numbers..."

28 posted on 10/06/2010 3:53:52 PM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: Still Thinking

Until adobe or a number of other tools are installed. Arbitrary code execution effects all OSs these days.


29 posted on 10/06/2010 4:53:59 PM PDT by driftdiver (I could eat it raw, but why do that when I have a fire.)
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To: Nachum

Yep - ban all Windows machines.

Go Mac

(Donning flame suit while ducking and running quickly)


30 posted on 10/06/2010 5:03:13 PM PDT by KosmicKitty (WARNING: Hormonally crazed woman ahead!!)
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To: Nachum
I've been saying this for years. I don't know why ISPs don't do this already. It's about time microsoft admitted that their systems aren't safe for internet use.
31 posted on 10/06/2010 5:07:24 PM PDT by zeugma (Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam)
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To: Nachum
Virus-infected computers that pose a risk to other PCs should be blocked from the net, a senior researcher at software giant Microsoft suggests.

It's not a stretch to expect that if they took this step, the next step would be to declare conservatism a virus.

32 posted on 10/06/2010 5:08:25 PM PDT by meyer (Tax the productive to carry the freeloaders - What is it with democrats and slavery?)
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To: Still Thinking
Here are Apple and Red Hat's phone numbers..."

Yep, I have been using Linux for over 10 years and have yet to get a virus or for that matter "slimeware". Rootkits? Yes, once. Viruses are a minor issue on most PC's, malware/slimware/adware are much more serious issues.

33 posted on 10/06/2010 5:08:46 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Nachum

How would the isp know a computer was infected to block it? Does it have to read the contents of your hard drive?


34 posted on 10/06/2010 5:10:47 PM PDT by CharacterCounts (November 4, 2008 - the day America drank the Kool-Aid)
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To: Texas Fossil
Viruses are a minor issue on most PC's, malware/slimware/adware are much more serious issues.

Yeah - like those newer popups that aren't popups. You know, the ones where you pass your mouse over a highlighted word and a popup shows up on your screen. A long discussion with MS brought no solution other than disabling scripting. Which is fine unless it's a site where you need scripting.

BTW, the popups occur in firefox also.

35 posted on 10/06/2010 5:17:13 PM PDT by meyer (Tax the productive to carry the freeloaders - What is it with democrats and slavery?)
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To: CharacterCounts
How would the isp know a computer was infected to block it? ?

And once blocked, how would the ISP know when it's cured (assuming it can be cured since virus updates are exclusively accessed on line).

36 posted on 10/06/2010 5:19:07 PM PDT by meyer (Tax the productive to carry the freeloaders - What is it with democrats and slavery?)
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To: Nachum

Maybe someone real smart can answer this———

At my public library when the computers boot up they boot up clean with zero memory of what previous users have. My library session has zero memory or holdover of any previous sessions.

How can I make my computer do this at home? For an experiment. My guess is this is done via a server computer which I am not equipped to do


37 posted on 10/06/2010 5:19:29 PM PDT by dennisw (- - - -He who does not economize will have to agonize - - - - - Confuscius.)
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To: Jeff Chandler

Public Health Quarantine was weakened and made obscure by micro-regulation mostly in order to protect AIDS infected homosexuals, but it was not abandoned. In some ways it was made more potent by regulation and law post 9/11, anthrax and the swine flu scares, etc.

Animal and plant quarantines are still common, as a quarantine (aka isolation) rooms in health care facilities.


38 posted on 10/06/2010 5:20:50 PM PDT by bvw
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To: martin_fierro

An ugly sight!


39 posted on 10/06/2010 5:28:59 PM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach ( Support Geert Wilders)
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To: meyer

Chasing a news story about a year ago I found myself reading an article on a Militia site. When I read the article and tried to move away, something shut down my machine and when it rebooted my virus program indicated I had a trojan. (on my company PC)

It was a nasty critter that I could not find a fix for. And I tried everything in my toobox. Talked with a buddy in the IT dept. and he told me about Smidt Fraud Fix. I downloaded it (command line utility) and it fixed the problem. I think the vector attached to the winsock and I had no other way to remove it. Thought I would have to reload the OS but avoided that. I had a lot of very expensive software installed that would have been a real pain to reload. What a mess.

Have never had that type of thing happen on one of my Linux boxes. They are not indestructible, but when configured correctly very reliable.


40 posted on 10/06/2010 5:30:41 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil

When you get an OS and all apps loaded, create an image of your hard drive. Then you can get back from bare iron to that initial clean, vanilla point in an hour or so. You’ll have to take complementary measures in order not to lose data files, emails, and so on.


41 posted on 10/06/2010 6:10:42 PM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: dennisw

Disable all cookies in your browser, don’t allow it to save any cookies.


42 posted on 10/06/2010 6:12:43 PM PDT by herewego ( Got .45?)
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To: dennisw

Download (for free) Microsoft Steadystate. However, it will no longer be available after the end of this year.


43 posted on 10/06/2010 6:20:29 PM PDT by Spiff
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To: Spiff; herewego

Download (for free) Microsoft Steadystate. However, it will no longer be available after the end of this year.>>>>>>>

Thanks much. Never heard of it before. Too bad it doesn’t work for windows 7. The library has WinXP and it must be what they use

I will try it w Windows XP. Thanks!


44 posted on 10/06/2010 6:53:06 PM PDT by dennisw (- - - -He who does not economize will have to agonize - - - - - Confuscius.)
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To: Still Thinking

What I was referring to was not the OS reload, but the reinstallation of Quark and Xtags and Xdata plugins, Creative Suite, Gimp, Ghostscript, MSoffice with netframe addition, some Excel plugins, a Java 5250 terminal immulator, Grep, Gnumeric, PDFtk, Bluefish (and more) and updating the OS. All of that is a genuine pain to get working again.

When I used that PC, I used every tool in the tool box to get the workflow done. A mixture of open source and closed source apps. The workflow process was a total hack.

I created a 3,000 page print catalog, the distributor seasonal promotion books (some were close to 1,000 pages), monthly specials, maintained the descriptions in the AS400 database and created the images for both print an the web for 37,000 items. (I took them to the web for the first time by extracting the image to item (sku) data after opening the print .pdf document and using Grep to extract the intelligence. And did the same thing for the item level sequencing for repeat of the catalog sections.)


45 posted on 10/06/2010 8:31:37 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil
What I was referring to was not the OS reload

Right, neither was I. In fact I would have been stupid to do so. Imaging the machine after just the OS install would be pointless as a restore wouldn't be any quicker than just starting from scratch and reinstalling the OS. I said to back it up after you got your apps installed, which addressed your original complaint.

46 posted on 10/06/2010 8:42:52 PM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: Still Thinking

OK, I understand. Ghost the drive. Good approach and I probably should have thought about doing that, but the apps I used were a bit fluid and there was not a beginning start point that had them all in place.

As it worked out, I was able to remove the Trojan and had no further problems with the install. I used that same machine for 5-1/2 years.

It was a Gateway to begin with, but I reloaded the OS in the beginning to allow it to be used in our network. It was picked up off-the-shelf with Windows Media, which did not allow the network config we needed. I put XP Pro on it and added the netframe upgrades.

It was very reliable machine.


47 posted on 10/06/2010 8:53:56 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil

Yeah, exactly. Either ghost the drive to another physical drive (now that’s a REALLY fast recovery — five minutes!) or you can create a single large image file and store it on a server if you don’t have the extra hard drive sitting around when you make the image.


48 posted on 10/06/2010 8:58:32 PM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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To: Still Thinking

The only real deficiencies I have with Linux vs Windows is with CAD apps and Publishing apps. That is coming along, but not really an acceptable substitute yet.

I messed with Scribus for a while, it is pretty good. But to script the input data I would have to write an import script in Python. I was not capable of doing that. Could probably have learned how, but did not have the time to do it. And at 62 programming is not that efficient.

As far as an acceptable substitute for AutoCad there is not one I found that would run on Linux. It may be at some point MicroStation or someone else will produce a port, but I have not seen it.


49 posted on 10/06/2010 8:59:46 PM PDT by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Texas Fossil

I’ve run AutoCAD from within a virtual machine and it runs fine. You could run VMWare and run AutoCAD in a Windows VM. I’d hate to give up AutoCAD for anything else, as I have 20 years of Lisp files that do half the work for me.


50 posted on 10/06/2010 9:02:49 PM PDT by Still Thinking (Freedom is NOT a loophole!)
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