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Today is Saint Crispins Day
Henry V | Shakespeare

Posted on 10/25/2010 4:54:12 PM PDT by Timocrat

Enter the KING

WESTMORELAND.

O that we now had here

But one ten thousand of those men in England

That do no work to-day!

KING.

What's he that wishes so?

My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin;

If we are mark'd to die, we are enow

To do our country loss; and if to live,

The fewer men, the greater share of honour.

God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.

By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,

Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;

It yearns me not if men my garments wear;

Such outward things dwell not in my desires.

But if it be a sin to covet honour,

I am the most offending soul alive.

No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from England.

God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour

As one man more methinks would share from me

For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!

Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,

That he which hath no stomach to this fight,

Let him depart; his passport shall be made,

And crowns for convoy put into his purse;

We would not die in that man's company

That fears his fellowship to die with us.

This day is call'd the feast of Crispian.

He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,

Will stand a tip-toe when this day is nam'd,

And rouse him at the name of Crispian.

He that shall live this day, and see old age,

Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,

And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian.'

Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,

And say 'These wounds I had on Crispian's day.'

Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,

But he'll remember, with advantages,

What feats he did that day. Then shall our names,

Familiar in his mouth as household words-

Harry the King, Bedford and Exeter,

Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester-

Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb'red.

This story shall the good man teach his son;

And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,

From this day to the ending of the world,

But we in it shall be remembered-

We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;

For he to-day that sheds his blood with me

Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,

This day shall gentle his condition;

And gentlemen in England now-a-bed

Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,

And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks

That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.


TOPICS: Miscellaneous; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: bandofbrothers; crispin; henryv; militaryhistory; saintcrispinsday; shakespeare
For those Bands of Brothers past and presently serving.
1 posted on 10/25/2010 4:54:13 PM PDT by Timocrat
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To: Timocrat

Amen brother man, Amen.


2 posted on 10/25/2010 5:02:23 PM PDT by onona (dbada)
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To: All

Okay Frenchies in your silly kniggit armor.....come and charge our positions while are Welsh bowmen fill the sky with arrows!!!!


3 posted on 10/25/2010 5:04:30 PM PDT by ak267
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To: ak267

Yeah, you have to wonder what they were thinking.


4 posted on 10/25/2010 5:15:52 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Making the best of every virtue and vice.)
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To: Tax-chick
They were thinking their armor would protect them long enough for them to get among the rabble archers and send them packing.

They had never met the Welsh long bow before.

5 posted on 10/25/2010 5:27:47 PM PDT by magslinger ('This is a United States Marine Corps FA-18 fighter. Send 'em up, I'll wait!')
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To: Timocrat

Shakespeare - Henry V - Act 4, Scene 3
=
[GLOUCESTER, BEDFORD, EXETER, ERPINGHAM, with his troops, SALISBURY, and WESTMORELAND enter.]

GLOUCESTER: Where is the king?

BEDFORD: The king rode out alone to view their troops.

WESTMORELAND: They have fully sixty thousand fighting men.

EXETER: That’s five to one. Besides, they’re fresh.

SALISBURY: May God’s arm strike on our side! These are frightening odds. God be with all of you, princes. I’ll go and join my men. If we don’t meet again before we meet in heaven, still we’ll meet joyfully. My noble Lord of Bedford, my dear Lord Gloucester, and my good Lord Exeter, and my kind kinsmen, warriors all, adieu.

BEDFORD: Farewell, good Salisbury; and may good luck go with you.

EXETER: Farewell, kind lord. Fight valiantly today. But then I do you wrong to say as much, since you are the very embodiment of bravery.

[SALISBURY exits.]

BEDFORD: He is as full of courage as of kindness, princely in both.

[KING HENRY enters.]

WESTMORELAND: Oh, if only we had with us here ten thousand of those men back home in England who aren’t working today.

KING HENRY: Who wishes that? My cousin Westmoreland? No, my dear cousin. If we are slated to die, the fewer, the better for our country, and if we’re slated to live, the fewer men, the greater the share of honor for each of us. In God’s name, I beg you not to wish for one more man.

By God, I am not selfish when it comes to money - I don’t care who eats at my expense. It doesn’t bother me when people borrow my clothing - I don’t care about these concrete things. But if it is a sin to be selfish about honor - I am the most guilty soul alive. No, my cousin, don’t wish that even one man who is now in England were here instead. By God, I wouldn’t lose as much honor as a single man more would cost me, I think - not even if it meant giving up my best hope for victory. Oh, do not wish one more!

Instead, make this known throughout the army: whoever has no spirit for this fight, let him depart. He will be given safe conduct and money for his passage home. We would not want to die in the company of a man who fears to die with us.

This day is called the Feast of Saint Crispian. He who lives to see this day out and comes home safe will stand tall when this day is named and raise himself up at the mention of Crispian. He who survives this day and lives to see old age shall yearly entertain his neighbors on the eve, saying, “Tomorrow is Saint Crispin’s Day.” He’ll roll up his sleeve and show his scars, saying, “I got these wounds on St. Crispin’s Day.”

Old men forget. But these men will remember every detail of what they did today long after they’ve forgotten everything else. And as the wine flows, our names, familiar as household words, will be invoked again: Harry the King, Bedford and Exeter, Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester. Good men will tell their sons this story and the Feast of St. Crispin will never go by, from this day to the end of time, without our being remembered: ...we few, we happy few, we band of brothers...for whoever sheds his blood with me today shall be my brother. However humble his birth, this day shall grant him nobility.

And men back in English now safe in their beds will curse themselves for not having been here, and think less of their own manhood when they listen to the stories of those who fought with us here on St. Crispin’s Day.


6 posted on 10/25/2010 5:31:27 PM PDT by Repeal The 17th
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To: Repeal The 17th

Not only was the Battle of Agincourt fought on St. Crispin’s Day but so was Balaklava and the Charge of the Light Brigade during the Crimean War but also the Battle of Leyte Gulf during WW 2.


7 posted on 10/25/2010 5:40:52 PM PDT by ops33 (Senior Master Sergeant, USAF (Retired))
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To: Timocrat

Brannagh’s masterful rendition:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-yZNMWFqvM


8 posted on 10/25/2010 5:48:43 PM PDT by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: Timocrat

No coach giving a halftime speech ever came close to that. It is english at its absolute best


9 posted on 10/25/2010 6:04:30 PM PDT by muir_redwoods (Obama. Chauncey Gardiner without the homburg.)
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To: Riley
I kinda like this rendition:

Machine Gun Shakespeare ~ Henry V

10 posted on 10/25/2010 6:07:18 PM PDT by giotto
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To: Riley

You bet, Brannagh’s version is my favorite.


11 posted on 10/25/2010 6:16:20 PM PDT by brushcop (CW4 Matthew Lourey CW2 Joshua Scott/ Kiowa pilots KIA Iraq '05. Thank you for our son's life.)
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To: magslinger
They had never met the Welsh long bow before.

I beg to differ, they were well acquainted with the "English Long Bow", most notably at Crécy (1346) when the English under the command of King Edward III and his son, the "Black Prince" Edward, defeated the French-led army of at least 3 times their number.

Henry V was King Edward's Great Grandson through John of Gaunt, brother of the "Black Prince". Shakespeare made reference to Crécy in the speech that the French King made to his nobles, reminding them of their disastrous loss then.

12 posted on 10/25/2010 6:25:25 PM PDT by SES1066 (If you don't vote in November, quit your bitchin!)
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To: SES1066

Quite right, I got French defeats mixed up. At Agincourt it was the muddy fields that slowed the French.


13 posted on 10/25/2010 6:56:13 PM PDT by magslinger ('This is a United States Marine Corps FA-18 fighter. Send 'em up, I'll wait!')
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To: Timocrat

Greatest speech ever.


14 posted on 10/25/2010 6:59:33 PM PDT by Skooz (Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us)
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To: brushcop

ditto


15 posted on 10/25/2010 7:01:29 PM PDT by Skooz (Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us)
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To: Tax-chick
"Yeah, you have to wonder what they were thinking."

If the french hadn't figured things out after Crecy and Poitiers they were never going to.

16 posted on 10/25/2010 7:03:47 PM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: magslinger
"At Agincourt it was the muddy fields that slowed the French."

Sending in their infantry around the English left might have helped a little bit. I guess they thought having them mill around in the rear was a better plan though.

17 posted on 10/25/2010 7:07:03 PM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: Tax-chick
Yeah, you have to wonder what they were thinking.

TMT (Too Much Testosterone) It's caused a lot of problems over the years.

18 posted on 10/25/2010 7:22:08 PM PDT by Timocrat
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To: Flag_This

French army commanded by a Frenchman. What would you expect?


19 posted on 10/25/2010 7:25:38 PM PDT by magslinger ('This is a United States Marine Corps FA-18 fighter. Send 'em up, I'll wait!')
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To: magslinger
"French army commanded by a Frenchman. What would you expect?"

You probably already know this, but the English two-fingered salute (kind of equivalent to our middle-finger salute) goes back to those days when the french would cut off the bow fingers of any English bowmen they happened to capture.

20 posted on 10/25/2010 7:30:53 PM PDT by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: ak267
Okay Frenchies in your silly kniggit armor

Kniggit armor? Is that because the Frogs croak "Kniggit, kniggit"?

21 posted on 10/25/2010 7:32:22 PM PDT by sionnsar (IranAzadi|5yst3m 0wn3d-it's N0t Y0ur5:SONY|TV--it's NOT news you can trust)
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To: Riley

Thanks so much for posting that. It is one of my all time favorites. Good pep talk for election day.


22 posted on 10/25/2010 7:33:54 PM PDT by 2rightsleftcoast (A)
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To: sionnsar

Pronounce knight phonetically.


23 posted on 10/25/2010 8:54:08 PM PDT by magslinger ('This is a United States Marine Corps FA-18 fighter. Send 'em up, I'll wait!')
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To: Flag_This

I didn’t. I did know an archer who shot with middle and ring fingers. His right index finger had been amputated. I don’t think you could swing it with your pinkie and ring finger and I would sure hate getting caught by the French again if you could. I doubt if the French would let you off as lightly a second time.


24 posted on 10/25/2010 9:03:27 PM PDT by magslinger ('This is a United States Marine Corps FA-18 fighter. Send 'em up, I'll wait!')
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To: magslinger
Pronounce knight phonetically.

By which set of rules? One set I know from the British Isles results in something like "k[uh]-Neeh[kh]t." (The [kh] sound here simply doesn't exist in English.)

25 posted on 10/25/2010 9:10:54 PM PDT by sionnsar (IranAzadi|5yst3m 0wn3d-it's N0t Y0ur5:SONY|TV--it's NOT news you can trust)
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