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Trove of Picassos Surfaces, and So Do Questions
New York Times ^ | November 29, 2010 | SCOTT SAYARE

Posted on 11/30/2010 1:08:08 PM PST by Ron C.

PARIS — Pablo Picasso gave them as a gift.

So said Danielle Le Guennec, 68, explaining how she and her husband came to possess a box full of 271 previously unknown sketches, paintings and collages by one of the 20th century’s most celebrated artists.

“It was very straightforward,” she said in a telephone interview on Monday, after the French newspaper Libération reported the find. Her husband, Pierre Le Guennec, 71, had worked as an electrician in three of Picasso’s homes on the French Riviera in the early 1970s.

(Excerpt) Read more at nytimes.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Front Page News
KEYWORDS: fortune; treasure
Hate to 'post and run' - have to get 'out the door' - what do you think, is the electrician telling the truth?
1 posted on 11/30/2010 1:08:10 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: Ron C.
IMHO, the Electrician is definitely telling the truth. These are early works..bits and pieces...

And lets remember that his heirs have 700,000 "documented" works between them.

Rotten, greedy kin....

2 posted on 11/30/2010 1:12:20 PM PST by Sacajaweau
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To: Ron C.
Doesn't matter whether he's telling the truth.

All that matters is who has the most money to pay a lawyer.

3 posted on 11/30/2010 1:13:30 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (DEFCON I ALERT: The federal cancer has metastasized. All personnel report to their battle stations.)
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To: Ron C.

what do you think, is the electrician telling the truth?
____________________________________________________________

The story sounds reasonable to me.

He worked in three of the homes, if he had been stealing, surely he wouldn’t have worked at 3 different homes and nothing was ever mentioned of missing works.

I buy his story.

(I didn’t read the full story, not registered for that site)


4 posted on 11/30/2010 1:17:04 PM PST by Irenic
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To: Ron C.

They have held these works for 30-40 years. I am curious as to why they did not try to sell them off earlier.It is not as is they were displaying the works in their home or gallery. They were sitting in a box in their garage.I wonder if the Statute of Limitations has anything to do with it that now they are coming forward.


5 posted on 11/30/2010 1:18:07 PM PST by chuckee
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To: Ron C.

I wouldn’t doubt it. Pablo Picasso was known for gifting
small works of art to people he liked.


6 posted on 11/30/2010 1:21:33 PM PST by CrazyIvan (What's "My Struggle" in Kenyan?)
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To: chuckee

No Statute of Limitations on stolen property. Proving title is a different matter.


7 posted on 11/30/2010 1:24:39 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: Ron C.

Seems as though the Picasso family is greedy.


8 posted on 11/30/2010 1:30:21 PM PST by taxtruth
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To: Ron C.
This is exactly like DeBeers limiting the supply of diamonds.

These objects dilute the demand for and value of their stuff, and they don't like it one bit.

9 posted on 11/30/2010 1:31:06 PM PST by E. Pluribus Unum (DEFCON I ALERT: The federal cancer has metastasized. All personnel report to their battle stations.)
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To: Ron C.

He payed for things and services with his works.


10 posted on 11/30/2010 1:53:57 PM PST by stockpirate (David Horowitz Democratic Party has been "seized by a religious cult" of the left!)
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To: Ron C.
I've seen a lot of Picasso's works in museums around the world... some of it is not worthy (yes, this is my opinion), but if someone(s) is(are) willing to pay for it/assign his massive amount of work value... more power to them.
11 posted on 11/30/2010 1:55:08 PM PST by Trajan88 (www.bullittclub.com)
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To: Irenic
I am an artist, not a world famous one for sure, but I have so many paintings and drawings that weren't good enough to finish or I got tired of working on. Someone could be stealing from me and I would be glad. On the other hand, Picassos later work is so childlike that it would be easy to forge. Make it weird and paint it blue, look mom a Picasso!
12 posted on 11/30/2010 2:03:33 PM PST by Ditter
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To: stockpirate

“He payed for things and services with his works.”

I’ve heard stories that rather than tip a waiter with cash, Picasso would often just do a little doodle on a cocktail napkin for the lucky server. Always signed them - that made it marketable “art.”


13 posted on 11/30/2010 2:30:00 PM PST by mrs. a (It's a short life but a merry one...)
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To: JoeProBono; Perdogg; nickcarraway
a box full of 271 previously unknown sketches, paintings and collages
Thanks Ron C.


14 posted on 11/30/2010 3:05:13 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: Sacajaweau
I think he's telling the truth too - for several reasons, the main reason is that the works of Picasso coincide with the time that he did the work at the homes, and I know for a fact that Picasso often 'partially paid' for work done by others with a few of his paintings.

The greedy Picasso Foundation just wants what is NOT theirs.

15 posted on 11/30/2010 3:37:29 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
You're sadly right - but in this case, it isn't the most money for 'a lawyer' - it's the 'most lawyers.' The sleazy Foundation likely has had a dozen or more firms at their beck and call, and has had them for many years.

I'm hope, in this case, is that public sentiment will turn toward supporting this old electrician, and against the greedy bastards within the Picasso Foundation.

16 posted on 11/30/2010 3:42:57 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: CrazyIvan

I’d heard he’d pay for meals with a drawing on a napkin.


17 posted on 11/30/2010 3:47:14 PM PST by skr (May God confound the enemy)
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To: SunkenCiv


18 posted on 11/30/2010 3:59:41 PM PST by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Visualize)
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To: Irenic
"He worked in three of the homes, if he had been stealing, surely he wouldn’t have worked at 3 different homes..."

My thoughts exactly... and that work was most likely done over a long period of time. Picasso had to have stayed for a while in each of those homes, and always returned to the electrician when he moved into a newer home.

Picasso most likely gave the electrician several bit's and pieces of artwork, (hardly 'paintings') at each visit, and there were likely many more than one visit at each home.

And, most likely at the time, the electrician wasn't particularly excited about any of the rather mediocre scribbles handed to him in 'partial payment' - he just took them home to show his wife what the fruit of his labor was - basically, non-payment.

What amazes more than anything (since Picasso was not very famous at the time,) is that either the wife or the electrician decided to keep them, without much hope of them ever being worth anything - but more as a reminder of the painter, because he kept calling for more work to be done - a 'good customer' (albeit, a rather poor-paying one.)

19 posted on 11/30/2010 4:02:48 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: Ron C.

Many years ago I got a chance to visit an art professor @ the University of Mass that whole house was minamalisitc, but sketches of folks like Picasso where all over the walls. Not my area of expertise, but this seems plasible. This was 20 something years ago and I was told the net worth of the art in the entire house was 1/4 of a million in 80’s dollars. I shutter to think what this collection is worth today. The Prof was 69 yrs old then, my guess he is no longer with us.


20 posted on 11/30/2010 4:04:32 PM PST by taildragger ((Palin / Mulally 2012 ))
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To: skr

I do that ( drawing on napkins , I mean).


21 posted on 11/30/2010 4:04:37 PM PST by de.rm (Bang, bang, . . bang. Shhh=Bush, the elder, E. Howard Hunt, LBJ, Mrs, Edgar Hoover)
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To: Ron C.

That was probably how he was paid.


22 posted on 11/30/2010 4:05:15 PM PST by shield (A wise man's heart is at his RIGHT hand;but a fool's heart at his LEFT. Ecc 10:2)
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To: chuckee
"I am curious as to why they did not try to sell them off earlier."

Likely because they didn't think they were worth anything - particularly 30 years ago! Then even after the name Picasso became more or less 'famous' - to them, they likely still thought that most of that stuff wasn't particularly exciting. (Certainly what I've seen of it, I wouldn't pay more than five bucks for any of it, if I didn't know who had created it.)

I think only recently, with the medical expenses they have faced, that they began to look at what they had to sell, and ran across that box - and thought then, 'Hey, maybe we might be able to get a bit of money from some of this.' Hence, the electrician taking some of it out and seeking information about its value.

I think the world should be contacting that greedy Foundation, telling them to, "KEEP YOUR GREEDY PAWS OFF THE ELECTRICIANS INCOME - HE EARNED IT!"

23 posted on 11/30/2010 4:13:03 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: CrazyIvan
That Picasso is KNOWN TO HAVE often 'paid' that way ~MAY~ be what allows a jury to hand that electrician total ownership.

I say, to hell with that greedy Foundation - they have no proof whatsoever that he stole a single one of the items that he has kept for decades.

24 posted on 11/30/2010 4:18:59 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: taxtruth
"Seems as though the Picasso family is greedy."

Seems that it is a 'Foundation' - rather than any member of his family. BUT, hey - I don't know... perhaps some member of this extended family gets part of any sale.

And... YES - this whole thing is motivated by GREED - that of the 'elite' within the art-world. I just hope the common man beats the snot out of them in this case.

25 posted on 11/30/2010 4:23:30 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: E. Pluribus Unum
"This is exactly like DeBeers limiting the supply of diamonds. "

Exactly! I remember VERY WELL, 8 or 9 years ago a little company in Florida began making TOP QUALITY diamonds - so that they would be cheaper for everyone. I too remember well thinking - THIS won't last long... and it did not.

It didn't take DeBeers more than about three months to buy that invention, pay off the inventor and his companions in business and bury the whole thing.

26 posted on 11/30/2010 4:28:41 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: stockpirate
"He payed for things and services with his works.

The documentation of that fact may make this old electrician a wealthy man. It is just too bad that he may well die before that takes place.

27 posted on 11/30/2010 4:31:18 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: Trajan88
"...some of it is not worthy.."

In my view, NONE of that man's work is 'worthy' of anything but ridicule. Likewise, anyone that tries to justify its worth is just as ridiculous - but there are a huge number of ridiculous people on this earth.

28 posted on 11/30/2010 4:35:26 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: Ron C.

Don’t mess with my fellow electrician’s! It might be a shocking experience!

Harold’s Electric Co.
Yorktown, VA


29 posted on 11/30/2010 4:37:05 PM PST by Yorktownpatriot
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To: Ditter
"...look mom a Picasso!"

LOL - yup, LOTS of kids do better work than Picasso ever did!

30 posted on 11/30/2010 4:37:29 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: taildragger
That's funny, td... and likely, you wouldn't pay a farthing for a one of those, nor would I, IF we saw them laying on a table at a garage sale.

So much for 'great artistry.'

31 posted on 11/30/2010 4:42:24 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: shield

Yep... some ‘pay’ - but, I’ve been ‘paid’ in the same fashion, and I think I only ‘framed’ one such ‘payment’ - and it too was done on a napkin. Trouble is, few in the public would know the artist, or care to know about him.


32 posted on 11/30/2010 4:45:38 PM PST by Ron C.
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To: Yorktownpatriot

LOL - yeppers... could be a sparkin’ smokin’ mess!


33 posted on 11/30/2010 4:47:32 PM PST by Ron C.
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Comment #34 Removed by Moderator

To: CrazyIvan

And maybe he only started signing to the giftees at a later point in life. Pretty incredible if this was done legitimately. I don’t think I could have kept my mouth shut for such a long time.


35 posted on 11/30/2010 5:01:45 PM PST by rabidralph
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To: JoeProBono

Priceless! Wait, is that the same as worthless?

Hey, that thing looks like a cartoon insulting to the Prophet!


36 posted on 11/30/2010 5:58:15 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: Ron C.

Don’t knock garage sales. A lot of good art has been found at them.
My late uncle was an internationally known art collector and critic, owning several very early and good Blue Period Picassos, plus a bronze-bust head number 6 of 9 of his mistress model. One of the 9 was exhibited at the East Gallery/National Museum of Art in DC about 6 years ago. I compared the exhibit bust with a picture I had of my uncle’s. Kissing cousins!

He also found a Rembrandt print in a “poster” store, and a Jackson-Pollock painting being used to prop open a door at an outdoor theater. Being a friend of Pollock and his wife, he had the painting restored and gave it to Pollock’s widow for only the price of restoration. I guess today it might be worth $100,000 or more, but my uncle was an honorable man and his friendship with the Pollocks was worth much more than selling this painting for a profit.


37 posted on 11/30/2010 6:21:11 PM PST by MadMax, the Grinning Reaper
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To: de.rm

If only it paid as well as when Picasso did it!


38 posted on 11/30/2010 6:22:00 PM PST by skr (May God confound the enemy)
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