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New sick leave rules for federal workers
Washington Post ^ | December 6, 2010 | Ed O'Keefe

Posted on 12/07/2010 11:03:19 AM PST by fruser1

Federal workers are preparing for a two-year freeze in pay, but they can also expect some positive changes to their sick leave policy in the new year.

Starting Jan. 3, federal workers may swap up to 26 weeks of sick leave for unpaid leave under the Family and Medical Leave Act to care for family members sick with serious communicable diseases, including the flu. They may also use the benefit to care for an ill or injured family member serving in the military.

In both cases, workers could receive up to 30 days of advanced sick leave if necessary, the Office of Personnel Management announced Friday.

Workers might choose to use unpaid FMLA leave because they can afford to take the time off without pay. Or they might want to use unpaid leave because they have a relatively low sick leave balance and are concerned about preserving enough leave time for future personal need. For example, pregnant women who are trying to accrue paid leave time could take advantage of the unpaid leave option to care for a severely ill or injured relative.

snip

As defined by OPM, family members are spouses, children, foster children, stepchildren, stepparents, grandparents and grandchildren, and same-sex or heterosexual domestic partners. The definitions were expanded to include same-sex relationships in June as part of President Obama's pledge to expand worker benefits to the partners of gay and lesbian federal workers.

snip

(Excerpt) Read more at washingtonpost.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Government
KEYWORDS: benefits; budget; federal
Wouldn't the most painless way to cut the employement expense of government workers be to simply do away w/such generous leave policies?

Even if not actually "spent" in a particular year, accrued leave benefits remain "on the books" as part of the overall budget and we have to pay taxes to cover that "line item".

This'd go for state & local as well as the feds.

1 posted on 12/07/2010 11:03:23 AM PST by fruser1
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To: fruser1

There is no real freeze in pay. They will still have step increases for seniority and all that.


2 posted on 12/07/2010 11:04:15 AM PST by GeronL
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To: fruser1

See what happens when you don’t give a two percent pay raise. lol. Good for the Government Workers who are hard workers regardless of what FREEPERS say. I tell you it is amusing how you guys THINK you know but don’t really as you don’t work with government workers. Most that I know work 14-16 hours a day (salary workers and no overtime or comp time).


3 posted on 12/07/2010 11:06:06 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: fruser1

I need new sick rules imposed on my boss.

How come I cant call in “disgusted” and get paid...?


4 posted on 12/07/2010 11:07:34 AM PST by mmercier
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To: napscoordinator
See what happens when you don’t give a two percent pay raise

Considering millions of private-sector workers haven't gotten a raise in years, I'd say you can take your public-sector sense of entitlment and stuff it.

5 posted on 12/07/2010 11:08:32 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: GeronL

Good for them. It is called promotion or longevity. If this is the way that civilians want it than they should also not get any additional funds from anything. My brother is an Engineer (civilian company) who got a promotion mid Summer so don’t act like civilians are getting the shaft....They get promotions too.....if you want a government freeze than a civilian freeze should be implemented too.


6 posted on 12/07/2010 11:08:58 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: dirtboy

That is such a dumb statement. There are 2.15 million government workers to your 100 million civilian workers. So your millions is a small percentage. Like I previously wrote, my brother received a promotion mid-summer so what is the big deal? It sounds like such a cop out when people cry about the poor civilian worker not getting raises. You don’t tell me that Doctors, Lawyers, Scientists, etc are not getting raises? Please.....I don’t believe it.


7 posted on 12/07/2010 11:12:38 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator
A step increase in senority does not necessarily reflect a change in responsibilities, so once again, you are just being a public-sector shill (surprise).

You really should respect those who are stuck with the tax bill for paying your salary a bit more. You seem to think you are entitled to a bigger bite of my paycheck with each passing year.

8 posted on 12/07/2010 11:13:02 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

I even got a raise at Subway about five or six times in the last two years working part time. I forgot about that. How can you say that civilians are not getting raises?


9 posted on 12/07/2010 11:13:45 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator
That is such a dumb statement.

Only to someone like you who is insulated from the realities of the private sector.

It sounds like such a cop out when people cry about the poor civilian worker not getting raises.

You sound as clueless as Nancy Pelosi.

You don’t tell me that Doctors, Lawyers, Scientists, etc are not getting raises? Please.....I don’t believe it.

Doctors and Lawyers are seeing cuts in pay as clients have less money for services. I guess that concept goes right over your head, since you can get a raise by Congresscritters and the Executive branch just mandating it, no new business required to support such.

10 posted on 12/07/2010 11:15:24 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: napscoordinator

Yes, I keep forgetting that WE are the servants of government these days.

The government sector is way overpaid.


11 posted on 12/07/2010 11:17:39 AM PST by GeronL
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To: napscoordinator

Ah, so your one experience in a low-wage food-service job gives you insight into the entire private-sector economy. Really brilliant.


12 posted on 12/07/2010 11:18:28 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

Well you certainly have your opinion but I am just saying that government workers who I DIRECTLY work with get a bad rap. If people would not bad mouth at least the DoD workers then I would not get so worked up. But government workers are more than just IRS, Department of Education and other agencies of that type.


13 posted on 12/07/2010 11:19:30 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: dirtboy

Well it proves that I have some experience. I haven’t heard anything from you at all.


14 posted on 12/07/2010 11:21:15 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator
I work in IT, with a major multinational corporation for a client. I've gotten awards from my client for my work from them. No one in my company has had a raise since 2007. And read articles about the private-sector workplace, and they echo the fact that private-sector pay is largely stagnant and many employees are also facing higher shares of health-care costs.

But I must bow to your part-time Subway sandwich-making experience, I guess.

15 posted on 12/07/2010 11:25:16 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: 4mer Liberal

ping


16 posted on 12/07/2010 11:26:24 AM PST by T Minus Four (Duh. We were talking about in the old days or not-so-distant old days)
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To: fruser1
I don't know of a single company or industry, that 'prepares' or 'is prepared' for the loss of an employee for any extended length of time.

Paid or not ... is that employee really needed?


I have an idea ...

Let's go through the gummint, office by office and determine the necessity, according to the Constitution, for;

The office,
The workers
and the salary.


I think we could across the board do away with 90 or more % of the czars for starters.

And every employee under and around that czar.

17 posted on 12/07/2010 11:28:06 AM PST by knarf (I say things that are true ... I have no proof ... but they're true)
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To: dirtboy

Come on you don’t. Look you are right in one area. I am insulated to America as I am in the military stationed over in Sicily working at the Naval Air Station here. The Subway is on base that I do in the evenings and on weekends sometimes. The only thing I wish we could come to an agreement on is that the DoD workers are not horrible. I will agree that the economy in America is horrid.


18 posted on 12/07/2010 11:29:13 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator
I never said DoD workers were horrid.

But federal workers have no business getting a raise in this economy - a raise comes out of taxpayers who largely haven't had a raise themselves in several years, so a raise for federal workers means a decrease in take-home pay for private-sector workers.

19 posted on 12/07/2010 11:33:27 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy

I can agree with that. Sorry that I get crazy especially when speaking about DoD workers. I wish they could split the DoD with the other Federal government workers who do suck....


20 posted on 12/07/2010 11:35:40 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: napscoordinator

Why should civilians get a pay freeze when their non-government employers can pay them out of voluntarily handed-over profits?


21 posted on 12/07/2010 11:39:18 AM PST by skr (May God confound the enemy)
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To: napscoordinator

My husband works for a city gov’t. and consistently works 12 hour days (no overtime, he’s salaried.) No pay raises for the past 3 years, in fact last year across the board pay cut of 3%. No COLA, of course. No additional “leave” policies. Hiring freeze, so those with exisitng positions have to carry more of a work load. The good news, I guess, is our city is now fiscally above water...no red ink on the books, but it took sacrifice on the part of city employees for it to be that way.

Seems that on state and municipal levels the employees are making sacrifices, but on the federal level very little sacrifice has been made.

And as far as civilian employees...glad your brother got a promotion, but our family members (some engineers from schools like GaTech, some with their master’s degrees in their field are are suffering from depressed wages...but are glad to be employed at least.)


22 posted on 12/07/2010 11:42:31 AM PST by dawn53
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To: fruser1
Starting Jan. 3, federal workers may swap up to 26 weeks of sick leave

I think it interesting that enough public employees have saved up enough sick leave that this has an audience.

I know long-time employees can eventually rack up a lot of sick days, but this sounds like it would be relatively rare in the private sector. For example, at a company I worked for, your combination vacation days and sick leave days were capped--you had to take any excess in that year of lose them. Sick days were fairly generous at this place, but not designed as a long term saving program.

23 posted on 12/07/2010 11:44:09 AM PST by Pearls Before Swine (/s, in case you need to ask)
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To: napscoordinator

I work for DOD and take exception to the BS from some of the feepers. Some just don’t have a clue and can’t distinguish between unionized state workers benefits and retirement vs. fed benefits and retirement. Most of us in DOD bust our ass’s anywhere, anytime in support of the warfighter.


24 posted on 12/07/2010 11:45:30 AM PST by coop223
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To: dawn53

I knew that state and local did not have it as well. Hopefully you will see a raise in the future after the sacrifices that were done over the last three years. Hopefully the economy just comes back. I predict that it will recover in 2012 IMHO. Thanks for the info.


25 posted on 12/07/2010 11:47:47 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: coop223

100 percent agreed!!!


26 posted on 12/07/2010 11:48:34 AM PST by napscoordinator
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To: Pearls Before Swine

I can’t roll over any paid time off - it’s use it or lose it - and I have lost it in the past because work needed to get done. The federal government apparently doesn’t see it as a major accounting liability to allow employees to accumulate large amounts of sick time the way the private sector does.


27 posted on 12/07/2010 11:51:28 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy
I work in IT, with a major multinational corporation for a client. No one in my company has had a raise since 2007.

Have you ever speculated on the result of all IT operations going on strike like a union and letting the mouthy jerks watch how fast the entire mechanism of their “multinational corporations” grind to a halt?

They like to make all that money, they can try fixing their networks and computers their own damn selves.

Should not take them more than, oh, one generation to get up to speed. Perhaps they just might see the light on correcting their priorities and directing funds to what keeps them in the game and dump most of the parasitic “management team.”

.

28 posted on 12/07/2010 12:00:14 PM PST by TLI ( ITINERIS IMPENDEO VALHALLA)
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To: napscoordinator
Over my years of service I earned about 3,700 sick leave hours. When I retired I had 3,400 sick leave hours. That meant that over the course of my career I used barely more than 1 day per year.

It helps that I appear to be immune to influenza and a number of other infectious diseases, but still I had to fill my jaws with crowns, implants and bridges sufficient to pay for a very nice car ~ clever scheduling at the dentist kept the hours at work down, plus if you don't use anesthesia it all goes faster.

There were other people who spent their sick leave on what we always called "mental health days". One fellow who did that was a paraplegic. One day his wife, who was a nurse, pushed him down the stairs in his wheelchair ~ I think he was right in taking those days, but his wife ought to have been taking them too!

Heart attacks are the worst. A federal employee who has a heart attack can count on spending 1/4 to 1/2 of his lifetime possible sick leave hours on one. Amputations are less wasteful of time. Liver cancer, though, is quite surprising. Couple of decades back we had four people at work die from it. They worked right up to the week they died, and minimized the impact on their sickleave.

First off, we all learned it doesn't hurt that much, and secondly, your spouse's annuity will be higher if the sick leave balance is converted upon your retirement.

Yes, federal government employees make such hard headed decisions in the face of impending terror and death! The courage to do that comes from hours at the office water cooler eh! (Or, more likely, because the federal government system has a bias toward hiring folks willing to make decisions).

29 posted on 12/07/2010 12:01:25 PM PST by muawiyah (GIT OUT THE WAY ~ REPUBLICANS COMIN' THROUGH)
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To: TLI

My mindset and the mindset of most IT workers is to keep things working, not shut them down.


30 posted on 12/07/2010 12:03:27 PM PST by dirtboy
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To: dirtboy
In the federal government accumulated sick leave turns into accrued sick leave when used. Otherwise it's just an account waiting until you retire. CSRS sick leave can be converted to total service time for retirement purposes. FERS sick leave cannot be converted.

Some people had both. Some had neither ('cause they use it).

31 posted on 12/07/2010 12:06:38 PM PST by muawiyah (GIT OUT THE WAY ~ REPUBLICANS COMIN' THROUGH)
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To: dirtboy
My mindset and the mindset of most IT workers is to keep things working, not shut them down.

Yea, they know that.

.

32 posted on 12/07/2010 12:08:55 PM PST by TLI ( ITINERIS IMPENDEO VALHALLA)
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To: napscoordinator
Most that I know work 14-16 hours a day (salary workers and no overtime or comp time).

The ones I saw at HHS when I went for an interview were working hard all right - watching soap operas on the TVs in their cubicles. By the time I got to the interview room, I already didn't want the job.

33 posted on 12/07/2010 12:16:19 PM PST by nina0113
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To: napscoordinator; dirtboy

And let’s not forget the raises those thieving federal workers gave themselves:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2007/04/23/AR2007042301563.html?hpid=topnews

Metro eliminated the Metrochek program entirely because of the federal worker abuse.


34 posted on 12/07/2010 12:19:43 PM PST by nina0113
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To: TLI
Yeah, well, there are also thousands if not millions of workers elsewhere in the world who would take over US IT jobs if there is a strike.

Something industrial union workers found out the hard way years ago.

35 posted on 12/07/2010 12:22:48 PM PST by dirtboy
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To: napscoordinator
Good for the Government Workers who are hard workers regardless of what FREEPERS say.

Nazi concentration camp guards were "hard workers". The point is, working hard at what and getting paid by whom at whose expense?


Frowning takes 68 muscles.
Smiling takes 6.
Pulling this trigger takes 2.
I'm lazy.

36 posted on 12/07/2010 12:36:27 PM PST by The Comedian (Government: Saving people from freedom since time immemorial.)
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To: coop223

Good to see a fellow DoD’er out there ... there is way too much bashing of federal employees. I worked for the largest defense contractor a year ago and then made the jump to DoD. I can easily say that an hour of my time cost the taxpayer $200 (shocking isn’t it ... that defense contractors ultimately get paid with tax dollars) when I worked for the contractor ... now it costs $100. I have eliminated the middleman and the government is getting a much better deal that they did this time last year. And I still make the same salary, but the work is much more challenging.


37 posted on 12/07/2010 12:39:41 PM PST by dartuser ("The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has limits.")
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To: napscoordinator

OK, so after defending Fed workers, you are now limiting your defense to just DoD workers because those are the ones you’re familiar with. I used to work at the VA hospital and there were bad workers and good workers, just as there are in any hospital. But there were a great many workers who were committed to the Veterans and would do anything for them. I know of instances when a vet without a winter coat would have a coat, gloves and hat bought for him by an employee out of their own pocket. These folks were devoted the the veterans.

I know there are unnecessary Federal agencies and in many cases whole agencies should be done away with, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t a whole bunch of workers who are committed to do their jobs well for their taxpayer clients.

But I can certainly agree there are way too many useless Federal employees in Washington DC.


38 posted on 12/07/2010 12:49:26 PM PST by Help!
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To: dirtboy
Yep. Outsource that call center to "Joe" and "Mary" using voice changers in India and watch the complaints and then canceled contracts come rolling on in. Ask Dell about having to bring support services back to the U.S.

Of course, we all can just rejoice in the never ending stream of bounced tickets from NOCs in India that restate the obvious on tickets to empty their queues and then local Desktop Support and Helpdesk has to step in for the offshore "engineers" i.e., call India and step them through telnet sessions and services restarts and THEN follow up with the facility rep to see if they are back up because they refuse to talk to "Bill" in Bangalore that has a "Masters Degree" in (I $hit you not) Microsoft Office.

Like I said, it's speculation. Not wanting to start a keyboard slugfest.

Perhaps just plant a few seeds of dissent. :-)

Who knows, you might get that raise...

.

39 posted on 12/07/2010 1:01:23 PM PST by TLI ( ITINERIS IMPENDEO VALHALLA)
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To: TLI

Oh, I’ve seen the joys and idiocy of outsourcing firsthand. But the bean counters are willing to find out the hard way - while their American workers lose their jobs in the process.


40 posted on 12/07/2010 1:10:51 PM PST by dirtboy
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To: napscoordinator

I’m a physician and haven’t had a raise in 17 years. I do more work now for less.


41 posted on 12/07/2010 4:58:53 PM PST by therut
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