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NASA's Voyager spacecraft nears exit of solar system
Agence France-Presse ^ | 12/14/10 | Staff

Posted on 12/14/2010 5:54:02 PM PST by Nachum

Washington - NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft has reached the outer edge of the solar system where wind from the Sun is no longer blowing outward, but sideways, the US space agency said. The spacecraft was launched in 1977 and has since snapped images of Earth and other planets in the solar system and provided NASA with crucial information as it makes its long journey into outer space. NASA researchers think Voyager 1 will leave the solar system and enter interstellar space, or the area in between the end of the Sun's influence and the next star system, in about four

(Excerpt) Read more at theaustralian.com.au ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: nasas; spacecraft; system; voyager

1 posted on 12/14/2010 5:54:05 PM PST by Nachum
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To: KevinDavis

space ping


2 posted on 12/14/2010 5:59:04 PM PST by Captain Beyond (The Hammer of the gods! (Just a cool line from a Led Zep song))
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To: Nachum

Voyager 1 bravely going where no machine has gone before. And phoning home the details.


3 posted on 12/14/2010 6:02:10 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: Nachum

This article reminds me of the movie Star Trek I. Even though I didn’t like the movie, it thought it was a cool concept...Voyager returning to meet the “creator”.


4 posted on 12/14/2010 6:02:57 PM PST by Bishop_Malachi (Liberal Socialism - A philosophy which advocates spreading a low standard of living equally.)
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To: Nachum

Fascination to note that in 33 years of travel, Voyager has moved 16 light hours. The next nearest star is 4 light years away or about 2000 times farther.


5 posted on 12/14/2010 6:03:00 PM PST by muir_redwoods (Obama. Chauncey Gardiner without the homburg.)
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To: Nachum

I guess it all depends on what you want to call the edge of the solar system. I believe our solar system is a bit more than a light year from one edge to the other in its entirety.


6 posted on 12/14/2010 6:03:20 PM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: Nachum

Goodbye, V’ger. Don’t come back.


7 posted on 12/14/2010 6:03:57 PM PST by Flag_This (Real presidents don't bow.)
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To: muir_redwoods
From Wiki

Much of our Solar System is still unknown. The Sun's gravitational field is estimated to dominate the gravitational forces of surrounding stars out to about two light years (125,000 AU). Lower estimates for the radius of the Oort cloud, by contrast, do not place it farther than 50,000 AU.[89] Despite discoveries such as Sedna, the region between the Kuiper belt and the Oort cloud, an area tens of thousands of AU in radius, is still virtually unmapped.

Image Hosted by ImageShack.us

Voyager hasn't even left the front porch.
8 posted on 12/14/2010 6:12:29 PM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: muir_redwoods; KevinDavis

66,000 years??


9 posted on 12/14/2010 6:12:37 PM PST by GeronL (#7 top poster at CC, friend to all, nicest guy ever, +96/-14, ignored by 1 sockpuppet.. oh & BANNED)
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To: cripplecreek
That is an excellent point. I will guess this length (void) is to help in the balance. Your point means an expansion of space to a point of balance to stability avoiding chaos. Your though was concise, mine too lengthy.
10 posted on 12/14/2010 6:18:57 PM PST by no-to-illegals (Please God, Bless and Protect Our Men and Women in Uniform with Victory. Amen.)
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To: Nachum

I believe it is at this “interface” that the spacecraft’s official name changes from “Voyager” to “Vger” (pronounced “Vee-jer”!


11 posted on 12/14/2010 6:20:42 PM PST by Logic n' Reason (You can roll a turd in powered sugar; that don't make it a jelly donut)
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To: GeronL

Actually, at it’s current speed (33,000 mph) a one-way trip to the nearest star would take Voyager about 80 thousand years


12 posted on 12/14/2010 6:20:42 PM PST by muir_redwoods (Obama. Chauncey Gardiner without the homburg.)
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To: muir_redwoods

I believe the new Horizons craft is faster. Its due at pluto in about 5 more years.


13 posted on 12/14/2010 6:23:58 PM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: Nachum
So long, farewell, aufvieterzein, goodnight.....

Write, now.

Laterkbye.

/johnny

14 posted on 12/14/2010 6:25:51 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Nachum

V-Ger!


15 posted on 12/14/2010 6:37:11 PM PST by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: Nachum

And my dryer breaks down after 4 years...


16 posted on 12/14/2010 6:39:09 PM PST by mommab2003 (Stop these White House Chefs!!!)
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To: cripplecreek
It is sorta big, ain't it?

And it's lost in the galactic haystack. Makes me grateful to get back home everyday.

/johnny

17 posted on 12/14/2010 6:40:44 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I wish I could find a map that showed were the voyager craft are in relation to that one. I don’t believe they’re much beyond the nearest orbit of Sedna.


18 posted on 12/14/2010 6:43:55 PM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: Nachum

VGer, we’ve made reservations for you with the restaurant at the end of the universe. 8 pm. be prompt!


19 posted on 12/14/2010 6:44:04 PM PST by theDentist (fybo; qwerty ergo typo : i type, therefore i misspelll)
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To: cripplecreek
Voyager hasn't even left the front porch.

Space is big. Really big. You just won't believe how vastly, hugely, mind- bogglingly big it is. I mean, you may think it's a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.

Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

Mark

20 posted on 12/14/2010 6:49:31 PM PST by MarkL (Do I really look like a guy with a plan?)
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To: cripplecreek
LOL! I googled AU to light hour converter and there is one. Who knew?

According to that, V-Ger is about 115 AUs out. According to Wiki, 76 AU is the closest approach of Sedna.

But yes, it's a long way away to the front porch. Ping me, or remember me when it's 2 light years away, and still reporting.

/johnny

21 posted on 12/14/2010 6:56:08 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Texas Fossil
Voyager 1 bravely going where no machine has gone before. And phoning home the details.

Wrong!
It was Voyager II that left our solar system first. Read all about it here.
I was part of ARIA (tail number 329) at 31,000 ft covering the launch and orbit out of Perth, Australia. That was on August 20, 1977. My story is at the bottom of the link about Voyager II.

Thanks for bringing up the memories and remember Voyager II was Number 1!!!

Cheers!

22 posted on 12/14/2010 6:56:28 PM PST by RileyD, nwJ (proud husband, father, and grandfather)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I’m counting down for new horizons.

http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/


23 posted on 12/14/2010 6:59:11 PM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: Nachum

My Dad’s power supplies are powering the Voyager spacecraft! He managed the RTG development program at General Electric. Way to go, Dad! May he RIP.


24 posted on 12/14/2010 7:03:47 PM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Nachum

Just like those Mars Rovers, it looks like we’re getting our moneys worth out of this one.


25 posted on 12/14/2010 7:08:09 PM PST by 2111USMC
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To: muir_redwoods

ouch.


26 posted on 12/14/2010 7:08:44 PM PST by GeronL (#7 top poster at CC, friend to all, nicest guy ever, +96/-14, ignored by 1 sockpuppet.. oh & BANNED)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom
God bless your father. He did good work.

Of course, my big fear is that after I'm dead, someone is still going to be using the software that I wrote. And unlike your dad's contribution, that would be a Bad Thing(tm).

But to have hardware still working after that long under those conditions? That's a posthumous Damn Good Thing(tm).

/johnny

27 posted on 12/14/2010 7:12:52 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: cripplecreek
I believe the new Horizons craft is faster

While it left Earth at a higher velocity than any previous spacecraft, Voyager got a big boost in speed from its encounters with the gas giants, and is thus faster right now (and always will be).

28 posted on 12/14/2010 7:13:54 PM PST by Abin Sur
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To: Nachum
As Michael Kaye would say "SEE ya!"


29 posted on 12/14/2010 7:15:35 PM PST by P.O.E. (Compact Theory)
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To: Abin Sur

I know New Horizons only got a gravitational boost from one planet.


30 posted on 12/14/2010 7:17:16 PM PST by cripplecreek (Remember the River Raisin! (look it up))
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To: Nachum
Vger
31 posted on 12/14/2010 7:26:42 PM PST by Neville72 (uist)
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To: ProtectOurFreedom

WOW!


32 posted on 12/14/2010 7:44:19 PM PST by yield 2 the right ( Space blank until I come up with a nice Tagline.)
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To: Nachum

There’s still no observational evidence of the Oort cloud except for the observed orbits of comets. The Oort cloud is a conjectured source of comets.

I prefer the conjecture of the late Tom van Flandern: comets are the residual debris of colossal asteroid/moon/planetary impacts of some millions of years ago in the outer solar system, returning at last to the scene of their expulsion.


33 posted on 12/14/2010 8:00:03 PM PST by Colinsky
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To: Nachum

Be funny if it reached the edge and then bumped into a wall. That’d get people thinking something was up.


34 posted on 12/14/2010 8:02:58 PM PST by Catholic Canadian
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To: JRandomFreeper; yield 2 the right

Thanks, Guys (Gals?). Dad showed me lots of photos of the development — really incredible stuff. They had to test the RTGs to make sure no plutonium would escape if the rockets failed to make orbit and crashed. They conducted all sorts of real failure tests to attempt to destroy the containers. It was an amazing engineering feat. I sure miss having Dad around to discuss technology. He led some amazing projects, including some really big and important ones he could never tell us kids about! I’ve met military people who know of the project and the only thing they’ll say is the same thing Dad used to say — “You can’t imagine how important this is to national security”


35 posted on 12/14/2010 8:03:58 PM PST by ProtectOurFreedom
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To: Nachum
Voyager II left the solar system first on 23 May 2006. Some details here.
36 posted on 12/14/2010 8:08:16 PM PST by RileyD, nwJ (proud husband, father, and grandfather)
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To: cripplecreek
I know New Horizons only got a gravitational boost from one planet.

Correct, Jupiter (about a 3 1/2 years ago).

37 posted on 12/14/2010 8:33:50 PM PST by Abin Sur
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To: Nachum

>>NASA researchers think Voyager 1 will leave the solar system and enter interstellar space, or the area in between the end of the Sun’s influence and the next star system, in about four years.<<

And will return as either V’ger or Nomad. Let’s hope that Captain Kirk can stop either of them in time. If not, all is lost. Run, the Earth will be destroyed.


38 posted on 12/15/2010 2:32:40 AM PST by NTHockey (Rules of engagement #1: Take no prisoners)
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To: cripplecreek

That’s true but Pluto is a whole lot closer than the next nearest star


39 posted on 12/15/2010 4:15:21 AM PST by muir_redwoods (Obama. Chauncey Gardiner without the homburg.)
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To: muir_redwoods

Only 16 more years and it will be a whole light day away. It will make it a light year in about 17,836 years if my math is correct.


40 posted on 12/15/2010 9:58:00 AM PST by HenpeckedCon (What pi$$es me off the most is that POS commie will get a State Funeral!)
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