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Was Patton killed?
New York Post ^ | December 18, 2010 | ROBERT K. WILCOX

Posted on 12/19/2010 12:17:44 PM PST by ConservativeStatement

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To: Patton@Bastogne

Have I got a present for you:

The General George S. Patton Story Narrated By Ronald Reagan
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvL0tj9ZaoY


151 posted on 12/22/2010 4:00:36 AM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: Patton@Bastogne

Have I got a present for you:

The General George S. Patton Story Narrated By Ronald Reagan
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvL0tj9ZaoY


152 posted on 12/22/2010 4:02:35 PM PST by Riley (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column.)
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To: muawiyah
That's all you need for a huge conspiracy theory about something

Okay, I've got it. Patton knew, via his aide, that Arthur wasn't a natural born citizen and this was the big secret Patton was going to reveal. Fifteen year old George Soros, already planning to use 3 year-old Ann Dunham and an African exchange student to be named later to spawn his chosen candidate for the presidency he would install 60-some years later knew that if the Arthur story became public, he'd never get his man into office and so ordered the hit. Your uncle, obviously, was the triggerman. Karzai knows the whole story and is blackmailing Soros to back his heroin smuggling empire.

153 posted on 12/22/2010 4:23:26 PM PST by Bubba Ho-Tep ("More weight!"--Giles Corey)
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To: LS
One of the gaps in my knowledge of WW II concerns the Russian Air Force.

Yes, the US supplied materiel in abundance to the Russkies: and I'd match the US production capabilities to Russia's in a heartbeat (the US produced some 48 Thousand Sherman tanks and variants, according to the good folks at Avalon Hill).

But I've never heard or read much about the Russian Air Force's capabilities: neither the quality of their *designs*, nor the actual airframes, nor yet again the skill of their pilots.

And I read once that Stalin pulled out of a planned takeover of Iran in '46 or when Truman sent an envoy to threaten Stalin that if he didn't leave, we'd nuke him.

Doesn't square with what you wrote -- can you give me more information?

Full Disclosure: I just bought your "Patriot's History of the United States" and "48 Liberal Lies" for my college-type cub for Christmas. I hope he lets me read them when he's done...

Cheers!

...oh, and Merry Christmas!

154 posted on 12/26/2010 6:51:13 AM PST by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: grey_whiskers
Paul Johnson writes that the British and Americans were supplying Soviet airplane engines as late as 1946. Their designs, mostly from Yakovlev and Tupelov, were good---probably the equal to all but the most state-of-the-art FW 190s at the time, but the Germans just didn't have many by the time they were fighting the Red Air Force on a regular basis.

The number on the Shermans and other tanks was 95,000, of which we gave 11,000 to Russia. I've heard the Iran story, but haven't confirmed it in any sources yet. But it's a big difference for Stalin to go to war over Iran, which he almost certainly couldn't hold and never occupied the way he had eastern Europe, and Germany or Poland. But the point is BOTH knew they couldn't win based on their strengths---his conventional forces couldn't be stopped without our atomic bombs, but we couldn't invade WITH the atomic bombs. Stalemate.

155 posted on 12/26/2010 1:48:13 PM PST by LS ("Castles made of sand, fall in the sea . . . eventually." (Hendrix))
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To: LS
Believe it or not, I saw the Iran story in Time magazine once upon a... you know.

Cheers!

156 posted on 12/26/2010 4:38:57 PM PST by grey_whiskers (The opinions are solely those of the author and are subject to change without notice.)
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To: Cicero
Patton, of course, wanted to take Berlin for the western allies, before the Russians got there, but he was not permitted to do it.

Patton also wanted to cut off the "bulge", effectively surrounding the German troops in the salient. This would have saved countless lives on both sides, and may have ended the war more quickly. (On the down side, it would have saddled the Allies with the logistics of dealing with a lot of prisoners).

I recall he was alleged to have made comments to the effect of 'Let's fight the b@stards now, while we have the stuff over here.', referring to the Russians.

157 posted on 03/20/2014 8:28:47 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Smokin' Joe

And he certainly wouldn’t have gotten into that Market Garden fiasco.


158 posted on 03/20/2014 8:29:20 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: truth_seeker
There are several other critical factors to consider:
1. A vast majority of Americans considered Japan - not Nazi Germany - to be the main enemy.
2. Perhaps in official Washington and among elites the Soviet Union was considered an ally; but for most Americans the alliance with the USSR was a war time union of convenience.
3. Agreed, the American public would never have consented to a continuation of WWII against the Soviet Union, but Americans would never consent to Soviet domination of Eastern Europe.
159 posted on 03/20/2014 8:50:54 AM PDT by quadrant (1o)
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To: quadrant
but Americans would never consent to Soviet domination of Eastern Europe.

I don't think most Americans even cared, there was still a strong isolationist bent, that was only done away with when the Japs attacked.

160 posted on 03/20/2014 8:52:01 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: dfwgator
Far too many Americans were of German, Hungarian, Polish, Czechoslovakian, Italian, or even English descent to tolerate Russians on the Rhine.
161 posted on 03/20/2014 8:54:53 AM PDT by quadrant (1o)
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To: neocon1984
Patton’s military career was pretty much finished at the end of WWII because of his political views and outspoken attitude. There was no need to kill him.

In reality, Patton was a war hero to many, and combined with his political views and outspoken attitude, that would have made him a serious contender in political circles.

He'd have had to watch his language in that day and age, but he'd have had a following. He and MacArthur were serious warriors who would have been (and in MacArthur's case was) a serious thorn in the side of the politicians, and who would not have tolerated well the policies of limited warfare versus kicking a$$ and winning unconditionally.

No, they would not have played well with the UN and the globalists, but Americans likely would have agreed with that. It has taken nearly three generations of programming from elementary school up to get a following for this globalist crap.

162 posted on 03/20/2014 9:11:24 AM PDT by Smokin' Joe (How often God must weep at humans' folly. Stand fast. God knows what He is doing.)
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To: Smokin' Joe
In reality, Patton was a war hero to many

In fact at the time, most Americans supported Patton when he was attacked in the Press for slapping that soldier.

163 posted on 03/20/2014 9:12:45 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Cheetahcat

My guess that anyone that really knows has long left their mortal coil.


164 posted on 03/20/2014 12:23:47 PM PDT by Vermont Lt (If you want to keep your dignity, you can keep it. Period........ Just kidding, you can't keep it.)
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To: quadrant

There are several other critical factors to consider:
“1. A vast majority of Americans considered Japan - not Nazi Germany - to be the main enemy.
2. Perhaps in official Washington and among elites the Soviet Union was considered an ally; but for most Americans the alliance with the USSR was a war time union of convenience.
3. Agreed, the American public would never have consented to a continuation of WWII against the Soviet Union, but Americans would never consent to Soviet domination of Eastern Europe.”

1. I doubt that you can support that. My parents’ generation fought WWII, my grandparents’ WWI, and I grew up with that history to build on, when I served in Germany during the Cold War.

Americans very much believed Germany was our enemy, and the USSR our ally because it was so.

2. Your commentary about “elites” seems to follow the contemporary fad of using that word, but you’ll need to support your written opinion with something to convince me.

3. Americans consented to the Cold War, which meant Soviet domination of Eastern Europe. We didn’t fire a shot. Our forces in Germany were meant ONLY to slow down the Soviet tanks rolling across Poland and Germany, until we could fire the nukes.

The Cold War did NOT start immediately at the end of WWII. It was gradual.

Recall Eisenhower’s warning about the military-industrial complex near the end of his term, which begs the question about what role our businesses-military establishment sought to keep tensions high?


165 posted on 03/20/2014 1:57:20 PM PDT by truth_seeker (Nissan)
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To: truth_seeker
I had ancestors fighting on both sides during the Civil War. One grandfather served in the Spanish-American War and the other in WWI. My parents’ generation fought in WWII; growing up I listened to endless stories from uncles about “the big one.” I served in Vietnam during the hot war.
Several books have been written about the feelings of Americans during WWII. Any good public library will have them.
Generally speaking, Americans knew Germany was the enemy, but the main focus of their animus was Japan; of course, Jewish Americans and Polish Americans had different feelings but they were a minority. The feeling of most Americans toward Germany did not change until the concentration camps were liberated. Please investigate this.
Every one of my parents’ generation that I've talked with - and that's a lot - had no illusions about the USSR and most considered communism a greater threat than Nazism, which they knew was specific to Germany; but communism had world wide ambitions. We were fighting on the same side but we weren't allies.
There were media elites in the 1930’s and 40’s just as there are now. Don't kid yourself.
Americans consented to the Cold War because they realized they had no choice. They realized that a medium sized state such as Japan or Nazi Germany did not have the population or industrial base to dominate the world but an empire such as the USSR did.
We didn't fire a shot. I think we did. I consider the Korean War to be an integral part of the Cold War, as it could not have been started or maintained without Stalin's consent. The war in Vietnam was a offshoot of the Cold War.

Please read all of Eisenhower's speech.

166 posted on 03/20/2014 3:47:48 PM PDT by quadrant (1o)
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To: centurion316

Don’t read much, do you.


167 posted on 04/10/2014 4:56:39 PM PDT by doberville
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To: doberville

I read prolifically. I don’t believe everything that I read, especially conspiracy nonsense completely unsupported by credible evidence.

I am currently reading Command Culture by Jorg Muth. It’s complete nonsense, but sometimes it’s important to read crap in order to better understand the more discerning points of view.


168 posted on 04/10/2014 5:05:38 PM PDT by centurion316
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