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2011 preview: Expect Earth's Twin Planet
New Scientist ^ | 12/21/2010 | New Scientist

Posted on 12/21/2010 3:23:40 PM PST by Dallas59



In 2010, one new exoplanet appeared every four days or so; by the end of the year, the total topped 500. But in September, a truly exceptional find punctuated this steady drumbeat of discovery: the first alien planet that could host life on its surface.

Gliese 581 g, spotted by a team led by Steven Vogt of the University of California, Santa Cruz, inhabits a "Goldilocks" zone around its host star, a band just warm enough to boast liquid water. At 3.1 to 4.3 times the mass of Earth, it is also small enough that it should be made mostly of rock. Although a second team of astronomers failed to find signs of Gliese 581 g in their data, if its existence is confirmed, it will be the most habitable exoplanet yet found.

(Excerpt) Read more at newscientist.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: exoplanet; gliese581g; goldilocks; goldilocksplanet; goldilockszone; planet; science; xplanets

1 posted on 12/21/2010 3:23:43 PM PST by Dallas59
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To: Dallas59
2011 preview: Expect Earth's Twin Planet

OMG! Does that mean there are two Obamas?

2 posted on 12/21/2010 3:30:20 PM PST by moovova (Don't let Obama spoil the word "hope" for you...)
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To: Dallas59

Steven Vogt of the University of California, Santa Cruz, inhabits a “Goldilocks” zone

I bet he does


3 posted on 12/21/2010 3:32:47 PM PST by Jolla
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To: moovova

And...four...MICHELLE’S!


4 posted on 12/21/2010 3:34:04 PM PST by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: Dallas59

If Gliese has a composition similar to earth and is 3.1 to 4.3 times the mass of Earth, the gravity would be pretty enormous. If so, it would be very difficult for humans to exist there. There might be some human-like creatures there who would be much like Superman to us. I also assume that the term “mass” used here means just that.


5 posted on 12/21/2010 3:35:33 PM PST by davisfh (Islam is a mental illness with global social consequences)
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To: davisfh

They may be very small and lightweight...


6 posted on 12/21/2010 3:37:48 PM PST by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: Dallas59
Wouldn't one expect to find the Goldilocks Zone in the constellation Ursa Minor?
7 posted on 12/21/2010 3:38:19 PM PST by mikrofon (Polaris Bears)
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To: Jolla

http://www.johnspeedie.com/healy/wacky.wav


8 posted on 12/21/2010 3:41:37 PM PST by BenLurkin (This post is not a statement of fact. It is merely a personal opinion -- or humor -- or both)
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To: mikrofon
No Green Slave Women...


9 posted on 12/21/2010 3:43:05 PM PST by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: Dallas59
this from wiki: "It is estimated that the average global equilibrium temperature (the temperature in the absence of atmospheric effects) of Gliese 581 g ranges from 209 to 228 K (−64 to −45 °C, or −84 to −49 °F) for Bond albedos (reflectivities) from 0.5 to 0.3 (with the latter being more characteristic of the inner Solar System). Adding an Earth-like greenhouse effect yields an average surface temperature in the range of 236 to 261 K (−37 to −12 °C, or −35 to 10 °F).[1][20] So it's like antarctica with MAYBE some small warm spots warm enough for liquid water here and there.
10 posted on 12/21/2010 3:49:50 PM PST by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: mikrofon

Most earthlike planets known to date:

70 virginis b

giliese 581 d

giliese 581 g


11 posted on 12/21/2010 3:52:41 PM PST by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: davisfh

Depends on the rock density. Surface gravity is a function of the radius of the planet.


12 posted on 12/21/2010 3:54:51 PM PST by BenKenobi (Rush speaks! I hear, I obey)
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To: mamelukesabre
No Green Slave Girls?
13 posted on 12/21/2010 3:54:56 PM PST by Dallas59 (President Robert Gibbs 2009-2013)
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To: Dallas59

It’s the Oort gals shakin we have to worry about.


14 posted on 12/21/2010 4:00:50 PM PST by txhurl (This Is Not America.)
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To: davisfh
Mass/gravity relationships are not quite that simple. If a planet, 4 times the mass of Earth, were the same density as Earth, it would also be larger. This means that someone standing on the surface would be further from the center of mass, partially compensating for the increase in mass.

It has been many, many years since I've done these kinds of calculations, but I believe the difference in surface gravity would be a factor of the cube root of 4 (about 1.6). This would be heavy gravity for a human, but would allow for walking about.

Of course, the other planet might be denser, the temperature might be much higher or lower (even if it is in the "Goldilocks Zone"), and the atmosphere could be very different. The biggest difficulty, however, would be in getting there to take a stroll on it.

15 posted on 12/21/2010 4:31:44 PM PST by 3niner (When Obama succeeds, America fails.)
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To: 3niner
... but I believe the difference in surface gravity would be a factor of the cube root of 4 (about 1.6).

A factor of 1.6 in weight!? That's going to ruin my diet!

16 posted on 12/21/2010 4:45:53 PM PST by 6SJ7 (atlasShruggedInd = TRUE)
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To: Dallas59

That looks more like a rat than a bear.


17 posted on 12/21/2010 5:07:57 PM PST by PAR35
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To: Dallas59
Nibiru???
18 posted on 12/21/2010 5:11:30 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: Dallas59
Nibiru???
19 posted on 12/21/2010 5:11:44 PM PST by Chode (American Hedonist - *DTOM* -ww- NO Pity for the LAZY)
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To: davisfh
There might be some human-like creatures there who would be much like Superman to us. I also assume that the term “mass” used here means just that.

It probably means just the opposite.

20 posted on 12/21/2010 5:29:31 PM PST by Seven plus One
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To: mamelukesabre

WOULD SUV’s help?


21 posted on 12/21/2010 5:37:36 PM PST by barb-tex (What else did you expect from the likes of 0? BTW, What ever happened to Rhodesia?, Oh, yes, Zimbabw)
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To: davisfh

Obama thinks he is superman. Let’s send him there.


22 posted on 12/21/2010 5:43:05 PM PST by freekitty (Give me back my conservative vote; then find me a real conservative to vote for)
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To: Dallas59; KevinDavis; annie laurie; garbageseeker; Knitting A Conundrum; Viking2002; ...
In 2010, one new exoplanet appeared every four days or so; by the end of the year, the total topped 500. But in September, a truly exceptional find punctuated this steady drumbeat of discovery: the first alien planet that could host life on its surface. Gliese 581 g...
Thanks Dallas59! The rate of new discovery will jump as new capabilities become operational, and new techniques are tried.
 
X-Planets
· join · view topics · view or post blog · bookmark · post new topic · subscribe ·
Google news searches: exoplanet · exosolar · extrasolar ·

23 posted on 12/21/2010 5:45:11 PM PST by SunkenCiv (The 2nd Amendment follows right behind the 1st because some people are hard of hearing.)
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To: Kevmo; LuvFreeRepublic; LittleBillyInfidel; LucyT; HighWheeler; ChuckHam; Elderberry; ColdOne; ...



24 posted on 12/21/2010 5:55:19 PM PST by KevinDavis (I have no problem with a black president. But the one we have now is yellow to the core)
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To: Dallas59
2011 preview: Expect Earth's Twin Planet


25 posted on 12/21/2010 6:24:17 PM PST by Vaquero ("an armed society is a polite society" Robert A. Heinlein.)
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To: mikrofon
Wouldn't one expect to find the Goldilocks Zone in the constellation Ursa Minor?

Sure - Ursa Major, Ursa Momma, and Ursa Minor are all in the same area.

26 posted on 12/21/2010 6:55:33 PM PST by Izzy Dunne (Hello, I'm a TAGLINE virus. Please help me spread by copying me into YOUR tag line.)
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To: Izzy Dunne

yo ursa momma!


27 posted on 12/21/2010 7:16:07 PM PST by mamelukesabre (Si Vis Pacem Para Bellum (If you want peace prepare for war))
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To: Dallas59
Gliese 581 g, spotted by a team led by Steven Vogt of the University of California, Santa Cruz, inhabits a "Goldilocks" zone around its host star, a band just warm enough to boast liquid water.

Two words: FLARE STAR.

Anything living there is going to get toasted, because the planet is going to be tidally locked, the warm side facing a star that fires mass ejections and hard radiation all the time.

The cold side is gonna be frozen.

Earth is rare in the galaxy, maybe unique. And I say this after 400+ star systems with planets discovered in our galaxy, NONE anything like ours. Keep looking, though.

28 posted on 12/21/2010 9:17:23 PM PST by backwoods-engineer (Onward to the battle royal!)
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To: backwoods-engineer

One also has to consider that even if we found a planet similar to ours, the likelihood of humans, or beings similar to us being there would be VERY remote. We’d be lucky if the planet even had dinosaur like creatures on it.

Heck... If someone a long time ago, in a galaxy far far away were to just randomly look at the Earth, they probably wouldn’t have found humans HERE. Our planet is 4.5 billion years old, and we’ve been here but only around 200,000 of that, which is virtually ‘no time’ in the grand scheme of things.

It all boggles the mind if you stop and think about it long enough.


29 posted on 12/21/2010 9:50:08 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: Dallas59

Anybody remember the formula they made up for Star Trek to explain why there were so many alternate Earths?


30 posted on 12/22/2010 11:20:40 PM PST by mrreaganaut ("All theory is against freedom of the will; all experience for it." - Samuel Johnson)
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