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(New Hampshire) Union Leader drops AP for new wire services (Dinosaur Media DeathWatch™)
New Hampshire Union Leader ^ | December 27, 2010 | Staff

Posted on 12/27/2010 5:54:22 AM PST by abb

The New Hampshire Union Leader and Sunday News and UnionLeader.com will make a major change in national and regional news, feature and photo providers as of Jan. 1, when they subscribe to both the Reuters America and the McClatchy-Tribune Information Services and end their membership in the Associated Press.

New Hampshire's only statewide newspapers and largest newspaper website will also continue to feature content from the Scripps Howard News Service and from the Washington-based Politico group.

Union Leader Corp. President and Publisher Joseph McQuaid said the move to Reuters and McClatchy offers editors a wider and deeper choice of content than did the AP, "but at a considerable savings, which we intend to use for more local coverage.''

Reuters America is part of the Thomson Reuters service, known globally for its strong financial content. It was recently launched as a general news service.

McClatchy-Tribune features material from hundreds of providers, including major newspapers such as the Chicago Tribune and Los Angeles Times.

McQuaid said the cost of Associated Press, coupled with its diminished New Hampshire coverage, were factors.

"We were providing more of AP's New Hampshire report than we were receiving,'' he said. "We would prefer that New Hampshire news consumers get that information directly from us.''


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Extended News; News/Current Events; US: New Hampshire
KEYWORDS: associatedpress; circulation; dbm; newspapers
Monday morning good news.
1 posted on 12/27/2010 5:54:28 AM PST by abb
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To: 04-Bravo; 1cewolf; aimhigh; andyandval; Arizona Carolyn; Bahbah; bert; bilhosty; Caipirabob; ...

ping


2 posted on 12/27/2010 5:55:20 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb

Out of the frying pan into the frying pan


3 posted on 12/27/2010 5:58:48 AM PST by bert (K.E. N.P. N.C. D.E. +12 .....( History is a process, not an event ))
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To: abb

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/27/business/media/27movies.html?ref=business
Hollywood Moves Away From Middlebrow

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748703548604576037500522813100.html?mod=WSJ_business_LeftSecondHighlights
As Oprah Network Readies, Team Tries to Keep It Real


4 posted on 12/27/2010 6:02:48 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: bert

I agree. 1/2 dozen = six.


5 posted on 12/27/2010 6:03:33 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb
I think newspapers are only going to survive if they do more local coverage in a fair and independent manner. Some small nod to international events may be covered but mostly it should be local news where the people can determine for themselves whether it is fair or not.

If it's insightful and well written, they will survive, if it is crap they won't.

6 posted on 12/27/2010 6:09:52 AM PST by McGavin999 ("I was there when we had the numbers, but didn't have the principles"-Jim DeMint)
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To: abb
Nacky Loeb bump!
7 posted on 12/27/2010 6:18:39 AM PST by the invisib1e hand ("Three hostile newspapers are more to be feared than 200 swords" - Napoleon Bonapart)
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To: McGavin999

Since I’ve started my local newsblog (I cover city hall, school board, county commission, etc) I’ve come to the conclusion that local weeklies and such can be just as derelict in reporting as the NY Times or LA Times.

What happens is the smaller papers do a lucrative business publishing the “legal news,” such as sheriff’s sales, meeting minutes, delinquent tax notices, etc.

The publishers usually are not too keen on uncovering the brother-in-law deals that always happen in local government. Some of the papers would completely fold if it weren’t for the legal ads.


8 posted on 12/27/2010 6:19:41 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: McGavin999
With the Internet in pretty much every home and as much as a dozen all-news channels on cable TV, the newspaper as we knew it is a relic that is slowly going the way of the telegraph and film-based cameras.

I stopped subscribing to my daily newspapers years ago when I realized they were only re-printing bland AP articles that I was getting off the Drudge report anyhow. Only the Wall Street Journal has anything to offer and now I get that online.

There is however a dearth of "local" news and if newspapers want to survive, they need to put some reporters back out on the street and focus on local news.

For example, my town paper (printed once a week) has a police blotter/fire log section. When I have occasion to see that paper, I go right to those logs but they always leave you wanting more information. For example, the police blotter will say "Report of deer attack on Steadman Street" or "Youths vandalizing cemetery" and leave it at that. Well, people want to know a little more than just that. Even "Cat up a Tree" might have a good backstory to it.

If the town paper put a couple reporters that focused on police activity alone, you'd have some pretty hard-hitting local stories to report and everybody in town would want to buy a copy or pay to see it online - because after all, we are all a bunch of nosy neighbors!

Then you have our local town politicians pretty much doing whatever they want because the local paper doesn't have the resources to cover them and the big-city papers don't care.

For newspapers, local news is where it's at but nobody is filling the void.

9 posted on 12/27/2010 6:24:52 AM PST by SamAdams76
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To: bert

Little Joey mcquaid, the publisher at the UL is running the paper in to the ground. Dropping the AP is a good idea but using Reuters! Reuters has some of the most anti-American, leftist reporting, as bad as the NYT.

The UL is losing money so badly, they actually stopped delivery of their Saturday edition anywhere outside of Manchester and a few surrounding suburbs and they combined delivery routes with the Nauseous Telecrap aka Nashua Telegram.

Invoking the Loeb legacy and name for anything associated with today’s version of the UL is an abomination.


10 posted on 12/27/2010 6:25:58 AM PST by NHResident
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To: abb
Good morning....you should post a link to your newsblog..I'd be interested in taking a peek.

Re the story about the Union-Leader dumping the AP..I thought the AP was OWNED by its subscribers..so does the UL now SELL its stock in the AP, and more importantly , to WHO?

11 posted on 12/27/2010 6:36:17 AM PST by ken5050 (I don't need sex.....the government screws me every day..)
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To: abb

AP is a shameless propaganda organization.


12 posted on 12/27/2010 6:43:02 AM PST by Tribune7 (The Democrat Party is not a political organization but a religious cult.)
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To: SamAdams76; abb
You are right, if the would cover local news like they used to in "the old days" they could make quite a lucrative living. The other thing that would be necessary is not always taking the other side. How about taking the side of most of your readers? Or, better yet, how about not taking a side at all?

Journalism was ruined when they started having courses in journalism in college.

13 posted on 12/27/2010 6:44:43 AM PST by McGavin999 ("I was there when we had the numbers, but didn't have the principles"-Jim DeMint)
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To: ken5050

http://lincolnparishnewsonline.wordpress.com/


14 posted on 12/27/2010 7:10:12 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb; bert; SamAdams76; conservatism_IS_compassion; All

“Out of the frying pan into the frying pan”

“For example, my town paper (printed once a week) has a police blotter/fire log section. When I have occasion to see that paper, I go right to those logs but they always leave you wanting more information. For example, the police blotter will say “Report of deer attack on Steadman Street” or “Youths vandalizing cemetery” and leave it at that. Well, people want to know a little more than just that. Even “Cat up a Tree” might have a good backstory to it.”

Thanks for the post/ping; BUMP; BUMP; Ping. Interesting thread. Thanks to all posters.


15 posted on 12/27/2010 7:12:28 AM PST by PGalt
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To: McGavin999
People like to see their kids on the front page. They like the police blotter, weddings, funerals, obits, and advertisements. Public notice of legal matters is useful. These things may survive in digital form.

OTOH existential self parody in the form of larger than life fear based promotions (eg anthropogenic global warming, water shortages, homophobia, underpaid public servants ...) seems doomed.
16 posted on 12/27/2010 7:20:25 AM PST by Milhous (Lev 19:18 Love your neighbor as yourself.)
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To: Milhous

Yep, along with the sob stories about the “poor illegal” family. You are right, the football playoffs, St Patrick’s day parade, 4th of July events-always a place for that stuff.


17 posted on 12/27/2010 7:27:58 AM PST by McGavin999 ("I was there when we had the numbers, but didn't have the principles"-Jim DeMint)
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To: abb

http://www.timescolonist.com/travel/Good+days+journalism+weren+always+good/4026475/story.html
Good old days of journalism weren’t always so good

http://newsafternewspapers.blogspot.com/
Predictions 2011: More digital convergence, AP Clearinghouse, more trailblazing from John Paton’s JRC

http://newspaperdeathwatch.com/
Timesspotting


18 posted on 12/27/2010 7:28:11 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb

I’ve been thinking for a while that just about anyone could set up a news wire service that would be a heck of a lot better than AP, with just a password protected website.

Not only could it include subscribers such as interested old media, but a lot of new media as well. It would work by blending facets of other, commercial and non-commercial websites. The articles within would be semi-copyrighted, only for commercial use by members, and non-commercial use by the public.

So no Righthaven b.s.

It would work by having an upload/download ratio for stories. If you want to republish someone else’s news, you have to contribute some of your own news, *that other people want*. If you just post lame stories that nobody wants, you are less able to download other people’s stuff.

Add to that the popularity of stories also boosting the contributors upload ratio, and *editorial reviews* and *criticisms* of articles, as well as feedback and requests for follow-ups.

Technically, all this stuff exists, and could be blended into a site. And amusingly, since only say 1,000 users, worldwide, would use the site, it wouldn’t have even medium demand put on bandwidth.

Members could still pay for stories, if they had nothing to upload, but only modest fees, split between the website and the original article source.

Once set up, the site could solicit contributions from around the world that its members might want to republish. Status on the site is strictly based on popularity of what you upload, and the quality of your content.

Even freelance writers and photographers can contribute, as long as they maintain a good ratio. It would look very good on a resume to be published by some big names.


19 posted on 12/27/2010 7:32:37 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

Sort of like FRee Republic? We already do a lot of that here.


20 posted on 12/27/2010 7:36:38 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb

http://tdn.com/news/opinion/article_fb222614-111e-11e0-a392-001cc4c03286.html
FCC’s ‘net neutrality’ rules are a lump of coal

http://www.csmonitor.com/Business/Latest-News-Wires/2010/1227/Comcast-dilemma-Buy-NBC-but-allow-rivals-access
Comcast dilemma: Buy NBC, but allow rivals access?

http://www.dispatch.com/live/content/editorials/stories/2010/12/24/protect-the-internet-disband-the-fcc.html?sid=101
Protect the Internet; disband the FCC


21 posted on 12/27/2010 7:50:44 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb
"Protect the Internet; disband the FCC"

Yet another fear based promotion. The FCC can only further embarrass itself with its ignorant, self serving, epically flawed interstate highway metaphor.
22 posted on 12/27/2010 8:37:21 AM PST by Milhous (Lev 19:18 Love your neighbor as yourself.)
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To: abb

Every time a newspaper bails out of AP an angel gets its wings.


23 posted on 12/27/2010 8:49:26 AM PST by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Made from the right stuff!)
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To: McGavin999

“I think newspapers are only going to survive if they do more local coverage in a fair and independent manner. Some small nod to international events may be covered but mostly it should be local news where the people can determine for themselves whether it is fair or not. If it’s insightful and well written, they will survive, if it is crap they won’t.”

You’re right. That is the only chance that local newspapers have to survive. Cover local news in depth and do it well. Unfortunately, I don’t think many will do that. They’re run by folks who are essentially clueless, who still don’t understand that the Internet has already killed them unless they radially change, and that there is no going back to the way things were.

I know for sure that this applies to my own local rag because I’ve talked repeatedly with the owner/publishers about these issues, and they claim to believe that the pennies they get from their super-terrible website will somehow magically makeup for the thousands they lose each month on printed ad and subscription revenues.


24 posted on 12/27/2010 8:57:06 AM PST by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Made from the right stuff!)
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To: catnipman
They’re run by folks who are essentially clueless, who still don’t understand that the Internet has already killed them unless they radially change, and that there is no going back to the way things were.

I know for sure that this applies to my own local rag because I’ve talked repeatedly with the owner/publishers about these issues...

And when you dare make suggestions, I'll bet they talk down to you like they're doing you a favor by taking your call.

25 posted on 12/27/2010 9:29:13 AM PST by abb ("What ISN'T in the news is often more important than what IS." Ed Biersmith, 1942 -)
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To: abb

Yes, as a matter of fact, some parts of FR would be useful in a system like that.

Other than the stuff already mentioned, I love the “linkdump” format, which ironically enough is used by Tampa Bay Online for the AP Wire, which drums them up a lot of business.

http://ap.tbo.com/breaking/national/


26 posted on 12/27/2010 11:52:59 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy
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To: abb

“And when you dare make suggestions, I’ll bet they talk down to you like they’re doing you a favor by taking your call.”

Yeah, pretty much. A little condescending, with a bit of tone like, “I’m the professional newspaperman, and what exactly do you know about anything?” Though not quite that bad because the owner/publisher knows me, plus you can hear the bewilderment in his voice as he tries to keep a stiff upper lip. I kind of hated to burst his bubble, especially when he was all excited about the growing readership of their awful website. I gently pointed out that readership and revenue on a website were two different things.

I feel sorry for them actually, though they were mortal enemies when I served on city council, and I’ll will miss the local rag because it still is the only source of local news, even though it has become disgustingly chock-a-block with some of the worst AP propaganda. It’s also anti-gun and mindlessly pro-global-warming, neither of which I understand, since this is a relatively conservative part of Colorado. Talking with the top editor a bit about global warming, taxation, and finance one time, I found him appallingly ignorant about all three subjects, as well as most every other subject for that matter.


27 posted on 12/27/2010 1:16:03 PM PST by catnipman (Cat Nipman: Made from the right stuff!)
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