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Robert E. Lee: Remembering An American Legend
Huntington News ^ | January 19, 2011 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.

Posted on 01/19/2011 4:46:39 PM PST by BigReb555

The Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans will sponsor their 24th Annual Robert E. Lee birthday celebration on Saturday, January 22, 2011, in the Legislative Chambers of Georgia’s Old Capitol in Milledgeville, Georgia that will begin with a parade to the Old Capitol at 10:45 AM.

(Excerpt) Read more at huntingtonnews.net ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; US: Georgia; US: Virginia
KEYWORDS: collegepresident; confederate; dixie; robertelee; scv; union
America has always loved her heroes like: Baseball Legend-Babe Ruth, Golf Great-Ben Hogan, Movie Actor-John Wayne and…..

Wednesday, January 19, 2011, is the 204th birthday of General Robert E. Lee.

Young people will get a school holiday in remembrance of Dr. Martin Luther King whose birthday is January 15th. But, will anyone tell them that January 19th is also the birthday of Robert E. Lee?

Booker T. Washington, America’s great Black-American Educator wrote in 1910, quote “The first white people in America, certainly the first in the South to exhibit their interest in the reaching of the Negro and saving his soul through the medium of the Sunday-school were Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson.” unquote

During Robert E. Lee’s 100th birthday in 1907, Charles Francis Adams, Jr., a former Union Army Commander and grandson of United States President John Quincy Adams, spoke in tribute to Robert E. Lee at Washington and Lee College’s Lee Chapel in Lexington, Virginia. His speech was printed in both Northern and Southern newspapers and is said to had lifted Lee to a renewed respect among the American people.

Robert E. Lee-Stonewall Jackson Day events are planned for Saturday, January 15, 2011, in Lexington, Virginia that includes a Memorial at Lee Chapel featuring Guest Speaker Kenny J. Rowlette with topic: Opposites In Command—The Legendary Partnership of Lee and Jackson. For additional information go to: http://leejacksonday.webs.com/

And the Georgia Division Sons of Confederate Veterans will sponsor their 24th Annual Robert E. Lee birthday celebration on Saturday, January 22, 2011, in the Legislative Chambers of Georgia’s Old Capitol in Milledgeville, Georgia that will begin with a parade to the Old Capitol at 10:45 AM.

Many more events are planned for Robert E. Lee…. who was born at “Stratford” in Westmoreland County, Virginia, on January 19, 1807. The winter was cold and fireplaces were little help for Robert's mother, Ann Hill (Carter) Lee.

Ann Lee named her son "Robert Edward" after her two brothers.

Robert E. Lee undoubtedly acquired his love of country from those who had lived during the American Revolution. His father, "Light Horse" Harry, was a hero of the revolution and served as Governor of Virginia and as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. Members of his family also signed the Declaration of Independence.

Lee was educated in the schools of Alexandria, Virginia. In 1825, he received an appointment to West Point Military Academy. He graduated in 1829, second in his class and without a single demerit.

Robert E. Lee wed Mary Anna Randolph Custis in June 1831, two years after his graduation from West Point. Robert and Mary had grown up together. Mary was the daughter of George Washington Parke Custis, the grandson of Martha Washington and the adopted son of George Washington.

Mary was an only child; therefore, she inherited Arlington House, across the Potomac from Washington, where she and Robert raised seven children.

In 1836, Lee was appointed to first lieutenant. In 1838, with the rank of captain, Lee fought valiantly in the War with Mexico and was wounded at the Battle of Chapultepec.

He was appointed superintendent of West Point in 1852 and is considered one of the best superintendents in that institution's history.

General Winfield Scott offered Robert E. Lee command of the Union Army in 1861, but he refused. He said, “I cannot raise my hand against my birthplace, my home, my children.”

Lee served as adviser to Confederate President Jefferson Davis, and then commanded the legendary Army of Northern Virginia.

After four terrible years of death and destruction, General Robert E. Lee met General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox, Virginia, and ended their battles.

In the fall of 1865, Lee was offered and accepted the presidency of troubled Washington College in Lexington, Virginia. The school was renamed Washington and Lee in his honor.

Robert E. Lee died at 9:30 on the morning of October 12, 1870, at Washington-Lee College.

He is buried in a chapel on the school grounds with his family and near his favorite horse, Traveller.

President Theodore Roosevelt described General Robert E. Lee as "the very greatest of all the great captains that the English-speaking peoples have brought forth."

1 posted on 01/19/2011 4:46:42 PM PST by BigReb555
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To: BigReb555
Image Source,Photobucket Uploader Firefox Extension
2 posted on 01/19/2011 4:47:34 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: gorush
That is George Washington Curtis Lee on the left, his dad seated in the middle and Walter Taylor on the right. These photos were taken days after his surrender.

Image Source

3 posted on 01/19/2011 4:52:36 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: BigReb555

A day to honor a great American and an honorable Christian Gentleman. May God always bless his memory...


4 posted on 01/19/2011 4:54:17 PM PST by patriot preacher
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To: patriot preacher

What a leader and fighter for States rights. We love him so. Here is a real hero.


5 posted on 01/19/2011 5:01:00 PM PST by Benchim
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To: BigReb555
In response to this article on General Lee, a friend who knows far more about the military than I wrote this comment. I found it interesting and thought that others might as well. General Lee was a gentleman and there have been very few who measured up to the standards he set for himself.
Some may not know this, but in photos Lee can be seen wearing the three stars of a Confederate States Army colonel, not a general, and he rarely wore any other rank insignia. In the CSA, the insignia of rank of general was three stars inside a wreath. There’s always been speculation as to why he did this — his inherent modesty, his recognition that colonel was the highest rank he earned from a legitimate government, his desire to wait until the Confederacy won the war and could legitimately confer higher rank, his recognition that three stars was the insignia of rank of a lieutenant general in the U.S. Army…. I’ve always thought modesty and honoring his previous rank were the reasons.

6 posted on 01/19/2011 5:06:41 PM PST by DanMiller (Dan Miller)
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To: BigReb555
It was pleasing to see schools throughout the southern states closed Monday in
recognition of Robert E. Lee Day, giving students the day off to honor a great man.


7 posted on 01/19/2011 5:11:53 PM PST by Iron Munro (When a society loses its memory, it descends inevitably into dementia - Mark Steyn)
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To: BigReb555

Arkansas’ Mayor of Marshall Jim Smithson proudly flew the Confederate Flag over City Hall this past weekend in honor of General Lee. When I called to thank him today I was told that I was the only positive feedback that he recieved. I was told they had numerous complaints from angry folks. I only wish I could do more to help than make a pitiful phone call.


8 posted on 01/19/2011 5:51:16 PM PST by spitter
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To: BigReb555
Lee should have been hanged. It was all the worse that he was a man of fine character and acted conscientiously. It's always the good men who do the most harm in the world. -- Henry Adams

Lee's reputation certainly was a triumph of good manners. If Lee had been cruder or ruder with less of the aura of saintly forbearance about him, he'd have been judged much more harshly by posterity. As it is, he's judged more on his presumed character than on the decisions he made and their effects. And the halo around Lee also influences how his subordinates, like Stonewall Jackson, are viewed.

9 posted on 01/19/2011 5:51:56 PM PST by x
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To: x
If Lee had been cruder or ruder with less of the aura of saintly forbearance about him

Like the "drunk" U.S. Grant? Or "madman" Sherman?

10 posted on 01/19/2011 6:18:31 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: x

“Stonewall Jackson would have a man shot at the drop of a hat....and he’d drop the hat himself!”

-Private Sam Watkins, Co. H 1st Tennessee.


11 posted on 01/19/2011 6:28:59 PM PST by Emperor Palpatine (I'm shocked! Shocked to find out that gambling is going on in here!)
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To: DanMiller

I have seen pictures of other Confederate generals with just three stars on their collars.


12 posted on 01/19/2011 6:40:58 PM PST by carton253
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To: x

He was much like George Washington. His character a deliberate outcome of the code he praticed. Not surprising considering his pedigree.


13 posted on 01/19/2011 6:47:50 PM PST by mrsmith
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To: BigReb555

So how many times are you planning on posting this same story?


14 posted on 01/19/2011 9:59:06 PM PST by rockrr ("I said that I was scared of you!" - pokie the pretend cowboy)
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To: gorush
I believe Taylor requested not to have to go to the signing at Appomattox, he cried and cried and begged not to have to go. Although he is in the lithograph taken/drawn at the event (actually that pose is the same exact pose beside Lees son in this photo).
15 posted on 01/20/2011 11:31:37 AM PST by Jolla
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To: Jolla

Interesting, thanks.


16 posted on 01/20/2011 1:37:00 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: Texas Fossil
"Like the "drunk" U.S. Grant? Or "madman" Sherman?"

Actually, neither of those assertions is sufficiently provable. Grant allegations have been blown way out of both proportion and context. Sherman loved, and had family, in the South. He was an accomplished General who was understandably hated by his victims. A more honestly curious historical search might alter your preconceptions.

Speaking of context, this is the opinion of a life-long, history loving, getting long-in-the-tooth, yankee southern sympathizer.

17 posted on 01/20/2011 1:50:59 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: gorush
who was understandably hated by his victims.

Also a history student, but I do not study CW history. It is too painful. Some of my ancestors came to TX during Reconstruction, they were literally burned out of AL then. My great-grandfather (age 7) and his mother came here without the father. His father was a wanted man, Carpetbaggers would have killed him had they found him. Those were corrupt, brutal and bitter times.

The history books are written by the victors. There were a lot of problems with the South but also with the North. Unwritten history is probably best left alone, but also remembered.

Don't missunderstand me, I have been a Republican my entire life. Was Republican County Chairman in a county in NM for a time. My ancestors would have approved, it is not a label thing.

18 posted on 01/20/2011 6:35:15 PM PST by Texas Fossil (Government, even in its best state is but a necessary evil; in its worst state an intolerable one.)
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To: mrsmith
He was much like George Washington. His character a deliberate outcome of the code he praticed. Not surprising considering his pedigree.

We don't know what Washington or Lee's own Federalist father "Light Horse Harry" Lee would have thought of Robert's turning his back on his oath and joining the Confederate forces.

We do have the example of Winfield Scott, George Thomas and Lee's cousin Samuel Phillips Lee, Virginians who honorably served the Union, though.

19 posted on 01/21/2011 1:29:31 PM PST by x
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To: x

Nor do we know what Lighthorse would have thought of a union which would do something so horrendous to Virginia.

Of course Harry died before Robert was old enough to have adult discourse on politics. Perhaps that would have made a difference though IIRC Harry had been disappointed in many later Federalist policies (tariffs come to mind) and with the hindsight of age all men see intemperance in their past- so he may not have defended the union as strongly as his history suggests.

Yet I feel sure, though he lived a thousand years, he would have always been appalled at any criticism of General Washington!


20 posted on 01/21/2011 3:46:57 PM PST by mrsmith
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To: gorush
Sherman was an accomplished General

As long as General Thomas was around to do the real thinking and most of the real fighting, Sherman looked just OK. Time after time, he stripped Thomas' command of his best troops to go on wild goose chases, while Thomas rolled up impressive victories, without which The March to the Sea and even Vicksburg ... could not have happened. IMHO, Sherman was a bit of a grandstanding opportunist, whose political connections are more of an explanation of his career than his actual fighting record.

Grant, in his memoirs, paid full ... if late ... tribute to Thomas. Sherman, in his memoirs, wasn't so gracious, offering Thomas only half-hearted apologies and excuses.

21 posted on 01/25/2011 2:41:19 PM PST by Kenny Bunk (Wanted: 1 Governor, 1 AG, to keep Obama off 1 state ballot in 2012.)
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To: Kenny Bunk

Interesting, Thanks. The book on Sherman I read didn’t, apparently, give Thomas his due. I shall happily look into the man. The miles I log through work provide me with the time to consume four audio books a month and History is my main flavor.


22 posted on 01/25/2011 2:50:15 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: gorush
Master of War:
The Life of General George H. Thomas

Author: Benson Bobrick

Try this one.

23 posted on 01/25/2011 2:57:58 PM PST by Kenny Bunk (Wanted: 1 Governor, 1 AG, to keep Obama off 1 state ballot in 2012.)
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To: Kenny Bunk

Thanks again, I just downloaded the book.


24 posted on 01/25/2011 3:28:25 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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To: Kenny Bunk

I’m 3/4’ through the book and enjoying it immensely...thanks for the suggestion.


25 posted on 02/09/2011 2:14:24 PM PST by gorush (History repeats itself because human nature is static)
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