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Green Follies Escalate in the Face of Failure (CFLs are a dud in the real world)
American Thinker ^ | 01/20/2011 | Ed Lasky

Posted on 01/20/2011 6:53:34 AM PST by SeekAndFind

Those widely heralded compact fluorescent bulbs (CFLs) turn out to be a bit of dud in the real world.

For years, we have seen traditional light bulbs vanishing from shelves of hardware stores and Home Depots across America.  They have been replaced by those screw-shaped things that bespeak the future -- a future of dull lights, money flowing overseas, Americans jobs being terminated, and promised energy savings going up in smoke.

From the Wall Street Journal:

California's utilities are spending $548 million over seven years to subsidize consumer purchases of compact fluorescent lamps. But the benefits are turning out to be less than expected.

One reason is that bulbs have gotten so cheap that Californians buy more than they need and sock them away for future use. Another reason is that the bulbs are burning out faster than expected.

California led the way, as it often does with damaging fads, especially those beloved by environmentalists and green energy schemers.  The Golden State has been wonderful for job creation -- in Arizona and New Mexico, as businesses flee from high energy costs and move to states with sensible energy -- and tax, and regulatory -- policies.

No state has done more to promote compact fluorescent lamps than California. On Jan. 1, the state began phasing out sales of incandescent bulbs, one year ahead of the rest of the nation. A federal law that takes effect in January 2012 requires a 28% improvement in lighting efficiency for conventional bulbs in standard wattages. Compact fluorescent lamps are the logical substitute for traditional incandescent light bulbs, which won't be available in stores after 2014.

California utilities have used ratepayer funds to subsidize sales of more than 100 million of the bulbs since 2006.  Most of them are made in China. It is part of a comprehensive state effort to use energy-efficiency techniques as a substitute for power production. Subsidized bulbs cost an average of $1.30 in California versus $4 for bulbs not carrying utility subsidies.

Anxious to see what ratepayers got for their money, state utility regulators have devoted millions of dollars in the past three years for evaluation reports and field studies. What California has learned, in a nutshell, is that it is hard to accurately predict and tricky to measure energy savings.  It is also difficult to design incentive plans that reward-but don't overly reward-utilities for their promotional efforts.There are additional problems since it seems the state may have over-rewarded utilities with taxpayer money to promote a program that has failed to live up to the green dreams of its proponents.

There are additional problems, since it seems the state may have over-rewarded utilities with taxpayer money to promote a program that has failed to live up to the green dreams of its proponents.

In the real world, these buggers burn out at a fast rate. If I may indulge the reader with my own personal tale: I bought into the dream, mostly because I thought I would save money and energy.  Also, I am lazy, and I got tired of getting up on the ladder or slippery surfaces to reach bulbs that needed to be replaced.  I thought screwing these wonder-bulbs in as substitutes would save me time and some nagging from everyone in the house.  Well...the nagging never stopped, since everyone complains about the quality of the light and how long it takes for these things to power up to their full brightness (a brightness that is a bit unnatural).  The studies in California show that these bulbs do not work well in recessed lighting and in bathrooms.  This is bad news for me, since most of our lights are recessed.

So once again, we see how government elites and green dreamers have pushed through programs -- imposing them on us -- that have proven to be boondoggles and failures.  The landscapes of Europe (and the balance sheets of its governments) are pockmarked with solar and wind power plants that are woefully inefficient at anything other than sucking taxpayers' monies down the drain.  Spain is wobbly in no small measure because of the billions spent on solar power ventures.  Germany's chancellor, Angela Merkel, is considering prolonging the operation of Germany's nuclear power plants because that is the only affordable way to keep Germans supplied with power (the plants were slated to be closed, with their replacements being ultra-expensive solar and wind power plants).

But back to the bulbs and the dimwitted ones who saddled us with these screwy things.  As Investors Business Daily (and all my family members) noted, the quality of light from CFLs is poor:

Despite governments' effort to market them, CFLs are not necessarily better. Tests conducted by the London Telegraph found that using a single lamp to illuminate a room, an 11-watt CFL produced only 58% of the illumination of an equivalent 60-watt incandescent -- even after a 10-minute warm-up that consumers have found necessary for CFLs to reach their full brightness.

Lack of light isn't the only drawback. CFLs apparently are so dangerous, the European Commission has to warn consumers of the environmental hazards they pose. If one breaks, consumers are advised to air out rooms and avoid using vacuum cleaners to prevent exposure to the mercury in the bulbs.

Compounding the problem is that these bulbs are usually made in China.  The old-fashioned kind that we grew up with are being phased out, and the very last American company making them turned off its lights and closed last year -- a victim of environmentalism run amok.  Hundreds of Americans, many in their 50s, were laid off with no place to go (I wrote a requiem on the closing).  The saga of the old-fashioned light bulbs is not just a nostalgic tale of buggy whips and horse-drawn carriages being rendered extinct by progress.  They were killed by government policy.

The new House may change that policy; one of the Republican proponents of CFLs, Congressman Fred Upton, has -- pardon the pun -- seen the light, and from his new post as chairman of the Energy and Commerce Committee, he may do what few politicians ever do: undo the damage they have helped to cause.

China is going gangbusters business selling us all sort of gimcracks and doodads that are supposed to save us megawatts of energy.  In the real world -- outside Washington, D.C., outside the centers of crony capitalism (since General Electric and other politically connected corporations feed off green energy programs) -- billions of taxpayer dollars are being exported to China in return for cool and futuristic-looking curlicues that are giant, toxic wastes of money.  

I think windmills are nice-looking -- at least in Holland, they are.  But they don't suit everyone's tastes.  The Kennedys and other mega-wealthy residents of Cape Cod have been in high dungeon for years over the Cape Wind project to place windmills in a windy area offshore.  The actual eyeprint would be quite small, but why should they endure anything but perfection as they (including Senator John Kerry) take their yachts out for a spin?

The bluebloods have been successful in killing the project.

Mere commoners have also complained about the environmental and health effects of having windmills near their homes or workplaces.  But they did not have their hands on the tillers of power and could not stop these projects from being built near them.  The Not in My Backyard (NIMBY) dynamic failed in the face of utilities, venture capitalists, and government officials plopping these projects around.  These are often in rural areas, and we know that elites, led by Barack Obama, don't have much respect or concern for hayseeds who live outside Washington, New York, Los Angeles, and other bastions of sophisticated civilization.  There are not many voters and very few donors to care about in those neighborhoods.

Government mandates regarding percentages of utility power that must come from renewables worsen the problem since this is just one more means of subsidizing grossly inefficient ways to generate power.  They would never be built without governments finagling the rules and balance sheets to rig the game to keep them alive.  Without these incentives, they would die.  Those vast solar power plantations and windmill farms will be the 21st century's industrial ghost towns.

The federal and state governments have been giving away hundreds of millions of dollars to get American companies to invest in green energy plants here in America.  In reality, all too often, these companies take the money and run...to China.  The products are then made there.  Again, American money (much of it deriving from the "stimulus" program) is flowing to China to save and create jobs over there.

The Chinese are laughing all the way to their banks.  So are the venture capitalists and green promoters who have benefited from their campaign donations to Democrats and the Democratic Party.

Will Barack Obama do his labor allies another solid favor during his meeting with Chinese President Hu Jintao?  Will Obama bring up complaints that China is violating World Trade Organization rules by unfairly subsidizing manufacturers of green energy products at the expense of union laborers here in America?

Why ruin a good party and upset the environmental theologians Barack Obama considers experts and geniuses?

Ed Lasky is news editor of American Thinker.


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Culture/Society; Editorial; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: cfl; environmentalist; green; lightbulb
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1 posted on 01/20/2011 6:53:36 AM PST by SeekAndFind
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To: SeekAndFind; FrPR; enough_idiocy; meyer; Normandy; Whenifhow; TenthAmendmentChampion; Clive; ...
 


Beam me to Planet Gore !

2 posted on 01/20/2011 6:56:14 AM PST by steelyourfaith (ObamaCare Death Panels: a Final Solution to the looming Social Security crisis ?)
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To: SeekAndFind

The government, not even his Zero-ness, can create a market where one doesn’t naturally exist.


3 posted on 01/20/2011 6:56:59 AM PST by Arm_Bears (I'll have what the gentleman on the floor is drinking.)
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To: SeekAndFind
Tests conducted by the London Telegraph found that using a single lamp to illuminate a room, an 11-watt CFL produced only 58% of the illumination of an equivalent 60-watt incandescent

Who ever said a 11-watt CFL is equivalent to a 60-watt incandescent is a liar. They are usually advertised at a 4-to-1 exchange, but from what I've seen a 3-to-1 is more accurate. Thus a 20-watt CFL would replace a 60-watt incandescent, but 11 watts won't come close.

A friend put in a set of 5 6500 Kelvin daylight CFLs in his dining room. They are painfully bright.

4 posted on 01/20/2011 6:58:11 AM PST by KarlInOhio (Washington is finally rid of the Kennedies. Free at last, thank God almighty we are free at last.)
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To: SeekAndFind
"In the real world, these buggers burn out at a fast rate. If I may indulge the reader with my own personal tale: I bought into the dream, mostly because I thought I would save money and energy. Also, I am lazy, and I got tired of getting up on the ladder or slippery surfaces to reach bulbs that needed to be replaced. I thought screwing these wonder-bulbs in as substitutes would save me time and some nagging from everyone in the house. Well...the nagging never stopped, since everyone complains about the quality of the light and how long it takes for these things to power up to their full brightness (a brightness that is a bit unnatural). The studies in California show that these bulbs do not work well in recessed lighting and in bathrooms. This is bad news for me, since most of our lights are recessed."

Wow. What a statement but no facts. We put CFLs in recessed lighting, in the bathroom and in our ceiling fans. Worked fine, lasted long time.

5 posted on 01/20/2011 6:58:31 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: SeekAndFind

The only CFLs I consider acceptable are neodymium bulbs. They produce pleasant light. I no longer use conventional yellow bulbs. They look terrible in a room!


6 posted on 01/20/2011 6:59:39 AM PST by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: SeekAndFind

I think John Galt was wrong. He should have said:

“When you see the lights of CALIFORNIA go out, then you will know we have won.....”


7 posted on 01/20/2011 6:59:46 AM PST by Red Badger (Whenever these vermin call you an 'idiot', you can be sure that you are doing something right.)
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To: SeekAndFind

I use CFL’s where I keep lights on for an extended period of time. They work great and last a long time.


8 posted on 01/20/2011 7:00:53 AM PST by Moonman62 (Half of all Americans are above average. Politicians come from the other half.)
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To: steelyourfaith

My ‘stockpile’ list continues to grow as everyday items will soon be VERBOTEN in what was once America:

Ammo (always!)
Gold & Silver
Cigarettes (for bartering)
Toilet Paper
Garden Seeds
Coffee
Sugar
Salt
Light bulbs
Yeast
Fish Oil
Lard
Toys guns for my future Grandsons
Ketchup
Plastic bags
Paper bags


9 posted on 01/20/2011 7:01:15 AM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'hobbies.' I'm developing a robust post-Apocalyptic skill set.)
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To: SeekAndFind
The United States has been, for the most part, almost totally lit up with fluorescent lights since the end of WWII.

Home lighting is a miniscule part of our power requirements ~ and in any case, EVERY SINGLE BULB has its own switch and is normally in an OFF state. Consequentially it is virtually impossible to gauge what incandescent light usage was and it's equally impossible to determine what benefit any switch to CFLs for home lighting could possibly deliver.

Having said that I cut my monthly power bill $50 by converting totally to CFLs some time back. My LCD TV whacked another $25 per month out of my bill ~ which actually surprised me!

Getting my eldest to move to his own home gave me $18 per month (from the hot water bill) and $33 per month from the reduced water usage!

Oh, happy day!

10 posted on 01/20/2011 7:01:25 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: SeekAndFind

“an 11-watt CFL produced only 58% of the illumination of an equivalent 60-watt incandescent — “

Then 22-watts would give you more than the incandescent and save you over 65% in electricity!

“even after a 10-minute warm-up that consumers have found necessary for CFLs to reach their full brightness.”

Misleading. CFLs reach nominal brightness in just a few seconds.


11 posted on 01/20/2011 7:03:39 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: SeekAndFind

AH ha ha! Went to Lowe’s yesterday and was going to see if they had any 100 watt bulbs. Nope! They had 95 watt bulbs! That’s 1 way around the stupid government ban! ROTFLMAO!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


12 posted on 01/20/2011 7:06:24 AM PST by US_MilitaryRules (Where is our military?)
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To: SeekAndFind

I’m hoping that the spotty reliability is due to the infancy of the product. I’ve had several of these buggers burn out in a matter of weeks. I”ve had several that take at least a minute to warm up to 80%, then slowly it gets to 100% from there.

As a counter example, I have a pole light in front of the house that has burnt through bulbs at a horrific rate. But one of these new bulbs has not lasted over two years and is going strong. That is WAY better than any other bulb I had put in there prior.

I don’t put any of these new bulbs that are less than 75 watt equiv, unless it’s in a hallway, which doesn’t need much light, IMHO.


13 posted on 01/20/2011 7:06:54 AM PST by SengirV
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To: muawiyah
My LCD TV whacked another $25 per month out of my bill ~ which actually surprised me!

LCDs use CCFL backlighting. Present LED TVs are still LCD but with LED backlighting and could knock another $25 off you bill.

14 posted on 01/20/2011 7:07:49 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: SeeSac; All; SeekAndFind

The argument isn’t that CFLs are totally bad, it’s that GOVERNMENT should NOT be FORCING them upon us!

I have CFLs in some spots and regular bulbs in others, depending upon the need. I don’t mind the CFLs in my kitchen ceiling fixture, and I have CFLs under the cabinets.

But - My upstairs hallway is very dark, so that NEEDS a nice, bright regular bulb in it; takes too long for the CFL to come up to brightness before I’m at the top of the stairway.

My reading lamp by the bed and by the couch are regular bulbs. I can’t read well by CFL light. But, if others can, more power to ‘em.

The CHOICE should be up to ME! What next? Deciding which CAR I can and cannot drive?

Oh, wait...they’re already working on that one, the b@stards! :)


15 posted on 01/20/2011 7:08:06 AM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'hobbies.' I'm developing a robust post-Apocalyptic skill set.)
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To: SeeSac

There’s a use for CFL’s, for sure. Especially in my (formerly gas-lit) lamp in the front of my house. They run cooler, so they work better in a room that is smaller and the heat is an issue in the summer. There is no filament, so it works well in areas with vibration. That said, I always prefer having a CHOICE!!! Let the marketplace decide.


16 posted on 01/20/2011 7:08:32 AM PST by jdsteel (I like the way the words "Palin for President" drive progressives absolutely crazy.)
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To: SeeSac
Wow. What a statement but no facts. We put CFLs in recessed lighting, in the bathroom and in our ceiling fans. Worked fine, lasted long time.

CFLs have lasted much longer in our ceiling fan lights than incandescent lights have. The vibration from the fans always killed the filaments early.

17 posted on 01/20/2011 7:10:45 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Moonman62
I use CFL’s where I keep lights on for an extended period of time. They work great and last a long time.

Yes. The ones over my basement stairs/back door entrance are on just about continuously in the winter and a lot of the time during the summer. It helps that I just need it for seeing where I'm going instead of reading or checking the color of anything, so the main complaints about them don't apply.

18 posted on 01/20/2011 7:14:14 AM PST by KarlInOhio (Washington is finally rid of the Kennedies. Free at last, thank God almighty we are free at last.)
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To: muawiyah
The United States has been, for the most part, almost totally lit up with fluorescent lights since the end of WWII.

Ug. Florescent lights good; compact florescent lights bad.

19 posted on 01/20/2011 7:15:25 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
I can’t read well by CFL light.

Works great for computer screens and TVs although newer LED units are great, particularly with zoned backlighting instead of edge lit.

20 posted on 01/20/2011 7:19:00 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: jdsteel
That said, I always prefer having a CHOICE!!

Choice is good; informed choice is better. :)

21 posted on 01/20/2011 7:20:20 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: SeekAndFind
I bought a bunch of these CFBs a few years ago and replaced every light in the house with them. Not only are they ugly, but the light they put off sucks and we didn't save on cent on our electric bills.
22 posted on 01/20/2011 7:21:38 AM PST by youngidiot
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To: SeeSac
I just bought a house, and the former owners used CFLs, almost exclusively.

One burned out in the bathroom. Typically, no big deal.

I took it out and went to replace it when I noticed that the base was all scorched. The bulb had obviously been overheating.

I said "uh-oh, maybe we've got a problem with the fixture". Sure enough, all of the bulbs in the fixture had that same scorching on them.

Being an engineer, and an inquistive type, I checked all of the bulbs in ALL of our bathrooms. Different rates of usage, different circuits, different moisture levels, different types of bulbs, etc. ALL of them had that same scorching on them. And, I can see why, in messing around some, they run really really hot.

We're now on incandescents. No problems at all, and I've been keeping a very close eye on them.

I don't know the manufacturer - there were a few with a visible stamp, but it was unreadable, due to the scorch marks. Maybe they were cheap bulbs, I dunno. But I'm not taking another chance. Period.

23 posted on 01/20/2011 7:22:47 AM PST by wbill
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To: SeeSac

I’m glad you are a believer in these lights. More power to ya.
I certainly am not a fan. My experiences are more in line with the article’s author. I have replced these cfl’s more often that I ever have had to do with incandescent. In simple setting like overhead bedroom lights. I suspect they cannot do the on and off too well.

I certainly cannot see anything approaching “savings” off my power bill and I am old enough to simply bristle at mandates by a bunch of people who are usually amd mostly profoundly WRONG, ie government bureaucrats.

I will definitely be laying in a bigger stock of various incandescents. Given their longer lives, I shouldn’t need much to last the rest of my life.


24 posted on 01/20/2011 7:24:33 AM PST by Adder (Part 1 Accomplished)
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To: SeekAndFind
The Kennedys and other mega-wealthy residents of Cape Cod have been in high dungeon for years...

While I agree that the Kennedys should probably be in a low dungeon, somewhere, I think the word the author is looking for here is "dudgeon".

Freudian slip, perhaps?

25 posted on 01/20/2011 7:25:24 AM PST by OldSmaj (I am an avowed enemy of islam and obama is a damned fool and traitor. Questions?)
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To: SeeSac

It’s that upfront extra $500 for the LEDs ~ that’s the part that has to come down.


26 posted on 01/20/2011 7:28:10 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: Yo-Yo
You can buy two kinds of lights for a fan. A CFL designed for fans. An incandescent beefed up for fans.

There are promises of a reliable LED for fans but you have this problem with current stability near a fan motor.

27 posted on 01/20/2011 7:30:17 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: US_MilitaryRules

95 watt light bulbs!

They are doing this in Russia too - their 100W ban went into effect this month——HA
http://www.themoscowtimes.com/news/article/95w-lamps-evade-ban/429286.html


28 posted on 01/20/2011 7:33:03 AM PST by libertarian27 (Ingsoc: Department of Life, Department of Liberty, Department of Happiness)
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To: SeeSac

I put one in my shower, I purposely bought a GE bulb that comes on as fast as an incandescent and doesn’t have much variance between when you turn it on and a few minutes later.

These things do have a useful niche to fill, I put one in my workout room where I didn’t want any heat coming from my light, it works fine.

Their niche is providing light with no heat and potentially saving a few bucks from less electricity usage, they can last longer than incandescents, but it’s a random crap shoot on how long they last, depending on the circuitry underneath.

Selling them as a “green” technology is misleading though. They’re different, but not green.


29 posted on 01/20/2011 7:33:36 AM PST by Brett66 (Where government advances, and it advances relentlessly , freedom is imperiled -Janice Rogers Brown)
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To: SeekAndFind

The CFLs are fine if your never turn them off. I’ve had a couple of always on bulbs in my basement for about 10 years. The same bulbs in normal usage (ON/OFF several times a day) only last 6 or 8 months.


30 posted on 01/20/2011 7:37:38 AM PST by BuffaloJack (What rights will the Obama's regime take from us today?)
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To: steelyourfaith

The new bulbs don’t work very well outside in the cold. They also don’t last long, and the produce low light levels. Ain’t progress wonderful?


31 posted on 01/20/2011 7:46:22 AM PST by Citizen Tom Paine (An old sailor sends)
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To: SeeSac

Not sure where you are from; I am from the north east. My CFL’s take way more than just a few seconds to warm up; hence, I do not use them in low traveled area’s of the house.


32 posted on 01/20/2011 7:51:00 AM PST by Michael Barnes
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To: SeeSac

The ones in my garage have been there a long time, I think I have replaced one. Don’t think you should be forced to buy them. But nothing wrong with them, leave it up to the consumer.


33 posted on 01/20/2011 7:51:10 AM PST by org.whodat
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To: SeekAndFind

Depending on Solar is going to be interesting when a large volcano goes off like Krakatoa did & blots out the sun for about 2 years.......

Just sayin’.


34 posted on 01/20/2011 7:51:15 AM PST by ridesthemiles
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To: Diana in Wisconsin
"The argument isn’t that CFLs are totally bad, it’s that GOVERNMENT should NOT be FORCING them upon us!"

Indeed. Show me where in the Constitution the FedGov has this authority.

"My reading lamp by the bed and by the couch are regular bulbs. I can’t read well by CFL light. But, if others can, more power to ‘em."

Try some with a different color spectrum. I've got CFL's in my reading lamp, and they work just fine. Look for those that most closely duplicate the spectrum of an incandescent. You can find both bulbs and info online. The "standard" CFL has a bluish tint, which "is" difficult to read by, but (I think the term is) "warm white" is much better.

35 posted on 01/20/2011 7:54:06 AM PST by Wonder Warthog
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To: SeekAndFind

First and foremost, I want to have lifestyle choices and not dictates from the government. Having said that, my experiences with CFLs seem to be better than what some are reporting here. I have been using CFLs thoughout the house for two years now without the loss of a single bulb. I mostly use the 23 watt bulbs to match in brightness the 100 watt incandescents they replaced. The “warm” color bulbs have the highest Lumen efficiency. Since the CFLs run cooler, I may save more from reduced A/C use than directly from the bulbs themselves. I have only two complaints: 1) the warm up time, and 2) the ghastly colors when I take digital photos inside my house without a flash.


36 posted on 01/20/2011 7:55:03 AM PST by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: SeekAndFind

I have places in my home where CFL’s work just fine and other places where I’d rather not have them. Typically basement, garage, places that tend to be cool where the long CFL warmup time is a problem. Should be my choice and not Washington’s.

I think before long improving LED technology may make the CFL’s obsolete anyhow.


37 posted on 01/20/2011 7:57:01 AM PST by Buckeye McFrog
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To: US_MilitaryRules
Went to Lowe’s yesterday and was going to see if they had any 100 watt bulbs

The local KMart has had 8-pks of 100W bulbs on sale recently.

Typically, I don't use 100W bulbs. I still bought a couple of packs to put aside.....you never know, I MIGHT want some, later. They won't go bad.

I've not seen the 95W bulbs yet. I've seen 34W (replace 40s) and 52W (replace 60s), though. Where there's a will, there's a way.

38 posted on 01/20/2011 7:57:32 AM PST by wbill
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To: Yo-Yo

When I bought this house, I opted to put in ceiling fans & not install the A/C.

I have 6 fans, each with 3 bulbs. In the summer, 4 of these fans runs 24/7. In 6 years, I don’t think I have replaced more than 6 bulbs total- & 1/2 of those in my office. I have Hunter fans I bought at Lowe’s for about $70 each & have never noticed any problems with vibration. The biggest electric bill I have had in 6 years was one month in a hot summer when I was filling horse water tanks almost every day. That bill was $125. In the winter, the bill runs about $90.


39 posted on 01/20/2011 7:58:27 AM PST by ridesthemiles
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To: muawiyah
I've used rough service bulbs for ceiling fans, and they never lasted very long, either. So far, simple 60 watt equivalent CFLs have lasted over two years without replacement.

LEDs would not have any current problems. They have internal voltage regulators.

40 posted on 01/20/2011 8:00:28 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Arm_Bears
I'm kind of surprised that the "Women, children, minorities hardest hit" crowd hasn't piled on to this issue, yet.

In seriousness, A CFL for 3 or 4 bucks represents a significant investment....if you don't have 3 or 4 bucks. Especially if you need to replace several of them.

A foolish expenditure, when you can buy incandescents four-for-a-buck at the dollar store.

41 posted on 01/20/2011 8:00:39 AM PST by wbill
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To: ridesthemiles
When we built our house 14 years ago, we put Hunter fans in the three bedrooms as primary ceiling light. Ceiling fan bulbs would last about 6-9 months before one burned out. I've gone over two years with CFLs now without a failure yet.

And I am anal about balancing the fans using the sticky tape backed lead weight kits.

42 posted on 01/20/2011 8:02:52 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Yo-Yo

The back EMF damages them. Again, I’ve got several fans I’m worried about and they all have lights. We are using beefed up bulbs in all of them at the moment, but there are “promises” of LED lights that can stand up ~ but I haven’t seen any at a price I’m willing to pay.


43 posted on 01/20/2011 8:07:25 AM PST by muawiyah
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To: SeeSac
What a statement but no facts. We put CFLs in recessed lighting, in the bathroom and in our ceiling fans. Worked fine, lasted long time.

I don't want the gummint shoving them down my throat, but I do use CFLs.

At our former house, they ran 5 to 7 years in kitchen and dining room fixtures. Regular bulbs only lasted about 3 months in those fixtures.

In our current house, every one of them I have is three years old. No failures.

To me, they only seem to take less than a minute to reach full bright. If you buy the 'warm' colored ones, people don't realize they are CFLs. I've had people tell me they don't like the light from CFLs and then are surprised when they find out that mine are CFLs.

Reminds me of the time I was eating some very tasty soup when I was in the Army. Guy told me it was mushroom. Before that I told people I didn't like mushrooms. Oops.

44 posted on 01/20/2011 8:25:21 AM PST by Right Wing Assault (Our Constitution: the new Inconvenient Truth)
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To: Right Wing Assault
I don't want the gummint shoving them down my throat, but I do use CFLs.

New EnergyStar rated light fixtures will not have screw bases making it impossible to use incandescents. For a new home to be EnergyStar rated, it will have to have those fixtures.

45 posted on 01/20/2011 8:44:40 AM PST by SeeSac
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To: KarlInOhio
A friend put in a set of 5 6500 Kelvin daylight CFLs in his dining room. They are painfully bright.

We have about 3 CFLs in places where we like to have a light on all the time - for example in the basement over the cat box. That's about it. Mrs NHD tried a regular CFL as a reading light but it was too dim compared to the "equivalent wattage" incandescent. She then got a daylight bulb. Talk about hideous. The thing is better at providing a headache than anything else. Bottom line, we have been stocking up on 60, 75 and 100 watt incandescents.

46 posted on 01/20/2011 9:02:47 AM PST by NewHampshireDuo
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To: SengirV

The round vanity lights you use around bathroom mirrors are now CFL’s in disguise. I put a set of these in my daughter’s bathroom, which made the room light up something eerie. Then she started coming down with headaches in the AM. Swapped the bulbs out, and the headaches disappeared.

Kinda wondering how long its going to take some bedwetter to pass a bill calling for a garbage inspector to make sure you aren’t tossing these things in the trash.

The ones under my house went in a matter of weeks after installing them. The one I put outside in the porch light has held up the best of all of them. I figured the quality of light doesn’t matter much out there.

The other issue I have with them is the size of the base. I can’t get them into a lot of fixtures that would have taken an Edison bulb.


47 posted on 01/20/2011 9:13:19 AM PST by RinaseaofDs (Does beheading qualify as 'breaking my back', in the Jeffersonian sense of the expression?)
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To: KarlInOhio

Indoors, I find the 6500K lamps horrendously blue. In the dining room, they probably make the food look like unappetizing crap too.

I don’t know whether we’re just culturally accustomed to low color temperatures indoors and at night, or whether its evolution; but it has to be one of these.

Now, a high CRI (color resolution index) lamp will usually be almost 6500K. That’s fine if you’re in the business of judging color samples, or doing photography; but that’s about it.


48 posted on 01/20/2011 9:51:30 AM PST by Erasmus (Personal goal: Have a bigger carbon footprint than Tony Robbins.)
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To: SengirV
I’m hoping that the spotty reliability is due to the infancy of the product.

1. A CFL has a bunch of electronic components inside it.

2. CFLs are all made in China, from Chinese components.

3. China OEMs and component makers are notorious for cheaping their products to the Nth degree. Their cheapness accounts for much of the component burnout in CFLs.

Importers have well-defined quality standards, but it's really hard to hold such distant suppliers to them. The traditional way for high-quality brands is to set up their own factories in which they can put all the stringent standards in place at the point of origin.

Maybe as Chinese industry matures, you will be able to get quality on a job-shop basis--as long as you know which shops to use.

49 posted on 01/20/2011 10:01:05 AM PST by Erasmus (Personal goal: Have a bigger carbon footprint than Tony Robbins.)
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To: Wonder Warthog

I’ve been liking the ‘Reveal’ bulbs for reading. :)


50 posted on 01/20/2011 2:33:16 PM PST by Diana in Wisconsin (I don't have 'hobbies.' I'm developing a robust post-Apocalyptic skill set.)
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